Search Results for: research

Vice President of Research and Evaluation role at IFF

Responsibilities:

The Vice President for Research and Evaluation will be responsible for the following:

Grow research consulting business

  • Innovate in response to marketplace: develop research consulting products that inform and guide social impact investments into social service sectors and comprehensive community development.
  • Prepare and manage annual budget for research department. Manage projects and staff time to meet established utilization rate and financial sustainability goals.
  • Develop client outreach strategy to maintain pipeline of contracted and grant supported research projects. Grow research network through meetings, presentations and marketing. Coordinate with regional staff, EDs and SVPs/VPs in selling research products.
  • Coordinate with Resource Development Department to identify funders and raise philanthropic dollars for research projects.
  • Evaluate internal tools for potential commercialization and work to bring those tools to market.

Oversee research team and portfolio

  • Maintain IFF research brand: ensure all studies and research products maintain IFF’s high standard of rigor, integrity and intellectual independence, while being pragmatic and actionable with practical recommendations based in best practice.
  • Develop project proposals and budgets. Negotiate contracts. Manage grants and funder relationships. Collaborate in funder report preparation, as necessary.
  • Support, inspire and guide staff in the implementation of research projects.

Nurture data culture at IFF

  • Supervise cross-departmental data management and data analysis team. Ensure high levels of data integrity, accessibility and integration.
  • Collaborate with IFF staff on the development of internal dashboards to track financial and non-financial data to drive and continuously reassess IFF transformative strategies.
  • Connect IFF data and external data to provide strategic insight into markets, sectors and impact.

Design and oversee program evaluation and impact measurement strategy

  • Design metrics to measure IFF social impact in consultation with the Executive Management Team.
  • Design methodologies, policies and procedures to capture lessons learned, build institutional knowledge and inform broader initiative. Work with other lines of business to implement.
  • Collaborate with other departments to design and implement program evaluation of major IFF initiatives.

Strengthen IFF’s position as a thought leader in key markets and sectors

  • Prepare and deliver public presentations to disseminate research findings for research projects.
  • Produce white papers to communicate insights gleaned from IFF initiatives for internal audience.
  • Identify opportunities to showcase insights relevant to external audience, and facilitate dissemination or publication of publish findings.
  • Collaborate with Corporate Communications and Public Affairs (CCPA) to develop public communication plans for research studies, public-facing tools and relevant lessons learned.

*View the complete listing here.

The latest news from the NCAI Policy Research Center!

*The following is a newsletter from NCAI.

Greetings to our partners! We hope this brief newsletter finds you in a good way. At the Policy Research Center, we are eager to drive data to policy. We hope to serve as a resource to tribal leaders and communities – connecting our partners with the most cutting-edge research and providing a forum for decision-making. To learn more about our ongoing work:
Tribal Leader/Scholar Forum presentations are now LIVE!
Miss the Tribal Leader/Scholar Forum in Uncasville, CT? Not a problem! You can download agendas and PDFs of the presentations on our website. Click the link below to be directed to our online archive!
We need your input!

We have a new team at the Policy Research Center and we would love your input on how we can best fulfill our mission! Please take 3 minutes to complete our evaluation!

Link to PRC Input Form

Download our latest Research Update!
Each quarter, we release a Research Update to keep our partners informed of our work and the latest trends in research.
In this issue, we review our newest publications, including a one-pager on how tribal communities can respond to the growing opioid epidemic. We also highlight the latest research on food security, college retention, infant breastfeeding, etc. among tribal peoples and communities.

Last but not least, we share new data resources, upcoming scholar forums, and funding opportunities!

Download our Research Update

Time to enact Tribal Research Laws & Protocols!
The Policy Research advises tribes to review their current research laws, or consider the development of new ones, in light of recent revisions to two major federal research policies, the Common Rule and NIH single IRB policy. This is an opportunity to advance sovereignty over research on tribal lands and with tribal citizens.
We developed a resource to clarify what these research policy revisions mean for your community:
NCAI Policy Research Center
1516 P Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
www.ncai.org/prc

Save the Date | April 16-18, 2018 | Population Health Research Summit

Discovery Research PreK-12 Program Solicitation

National Science Foundation

Directorate for Education & Human Resources
Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter’s local time):

November 14, 2017

November 14, 2018

Synopsis of Program:

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal’s main objectives and research questions. The program supports five types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, and (5) Conferences and Syntheses. All five types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands.

Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

Evaluation/Research position at LEAD Center

Looking for an evaluation/researcher position with the Community of Practice?
The LEAD Center is recruiting (in partnership with Gear Learning) to fill this position.

http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/495223/games-and-learning-researcher
GAMES AND LEARNING RESEARCHER at UW–Madison<http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/495223/games-and-learning-researcher>
jobs.hr.wisc.edu

BPC Partners with Northwest Area Foundation & Rainbow Research on National Workforce Development Project

Shawano, WI May 19, 2017 Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) has been hired to work as an evaluation and technical assistance subject matter expert to work on a new workforce development initiative funded by the Northwest Area Foundation (NWAF).  The NWAF “Reservation-based Work Opportunity Initiative” is part of the “Work Opportunity” portfolio of NWAF to provide funding and support to Native-led grantees for the focus areas of:

  1. Promising career pathway programs that link training to available jobs.
  2. Capacity building efforts to increase the effectiveness of workforce organizations and their leaders.
  3. “Building the field” activities that lead to a larger and more networked field of stakeholders invested in reservation-based workforce efforts.

BPC’s partnership with Rainbow Research (RR) will support the efforts of the grantees who will work to increase workforce development skills and capacities of their organizations; strengthening systemic supports with non-Tribal workforce partners; and increasing the participation, knowledge, and skills of Tribal workforce participants.   This will result in a Native-led grantee portfolio that documents Tribal workforce development best practices, best strategies for program effectiveness, and a greater understanding and capacity of local Tribal and non-Tribal workforce system partners to increase reservation-based work opportunities.

BPC will work with RR as an Indigenous evaluation and multi-jurisdictional workforce education systems subject matter expert.  BPC will provide support to needs assessments, grantee training and technical assistance, curriculum development and implementation, and design of a culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation study.  BPC will also provide technical feedback to grantees on their evaluation and data collection instruments and support the capacity, knowledge, and skill building of RR and NWAF to strongly support the efforts of Native-led grantees from Reservation or urban workforce contexts. Bowman Performance Consulting has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance.  Their living mission and motto is “working WITH people and not ON them.” If you would like more information about this project, please contact BPC at 715-526-9240 or by email sarah@bpcwi.com.

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New HHS Research Brief: Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently released a new research brief entitled Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness.

About the Brief

Using data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study, the brief examines the well-being of young children 20 months after staying in emergency homeless shelters with their families. It draws comparisons between children who experienced homelessness and national norms for children of the same age. The brief also examines housing instability, child care instability, and enrollment in center-based care and Head Start, and associations between housing and child care stability and child well-being.

Summary of Findings

The brief finds that twenty months after staying in an emergency shelter with their families, young children scored worse in pre-reading skills and had higher rates of overall behavior problems and early development delays compared to national norms for children their age. However, they displayed only small disadvantages in pre-math skills, and for some types of behavioral challenges their rates were similar to national norms. Unstable housing arrangements remained common during the 20 months following a stay in emergency shelter, with children who had more stable recent living situations and more stable child care arrangements displaying fewer behavior problems 20 months after a shelter stay than those who did not. In addition, enrollment in early education and center-based care was lower for families who had experienced housing instability in the past six months compared to those who had been stably re-housed. However, housing instability did not appear to be associated with lower enrollment in Head Start programs. Moreover, children ages three and four who were enrolled in Head Start or other early education and center-based care displayed stronger pre-math and pre-reading skills than those who were only in parental care.

Download the Brief

Well-being of Young Children after Experiencing Homelessness, along with two other research briefs that are part of the same series, are available for downloading athttps://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre/research/project/homeless-families-research-briefs.

Research Grant Opportunity: William T Grant Foundation

The William T Grant Foundation funds research that increases understanding in the following areas: 1) programs, policies and practices that reduce inequality in youth outcomes, and 2) strategies to improve the use of research evidence in ways that benefit youth. Research grants about reducing inequality typically range between $100,000 and $600,000 and cover two to three years of support. Research grants about improving the use of research initiative will range between $100,000 and $1,000,000 and cover two to four years of support.

We realize this funding opportunity is not for evaluation; however, many Network members also conduct research. The Research Grants Application Guide is attached to this message.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Research project advances the Foundation’s interests in understanding programs, policies, and practices that reduce inequality or improving the use of research evidence.
  • Research project has compelling relevance for programs, policies, and practices affecting youth ages 5-25 in the U.S.
  • Funds primarily support research activities, not intervention or service costs.
  • Applicant is employed at a tax-exempt organization

The online application for a research grant is now open. The next deadline for submitting letters of inquiry in 2017 is May 3, 2017 at 3:00 pm EST. More information about this opportunity can be found via this link (http://wtgrantfoundation.org/grants/research-grants).

Friday Funny! Research?

Research? You mean like Google?

BPC provides research services. Find out more!

Video: Collaborations with Native American Nations: Community Based Participatory Research

Please watch and share Team Roswell’s journey and approach to community based research efforts in Native American communities.

The piece helps create awareness, education, and notes the importance of Employee Assistance Programs as a means of prevention and intervention.

Special thanks to Roswell Park’s Office of Cancer Health Disparities Research, RPCI’s Health Behavior and Health Communications Resource Team, and our community media partner, Western Door Productions (Gary Sundown). An additional thanks to academic champion and actor Dr. Evan Adams for sharing insights to workplace health (a.k.a. “Thomas-Builds-the-Fire”; Smoke Signals)