Webinar! Indigenous Evaluation 101: Designing Evaluations that Are Culturally Responsive & Scientifically Rigorous

webinar imageIndigenous Evaluation 101:  Designing Evaluations that Are Culturally Responsive & Scientifically Rigorous Three Part Webinar

Webinar website

  • Part 1-Evaluation 101 and Importance for Tribal Planning & Infrastructure

Monday June 20th, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

  • Part 2-Evaluation Designs for Tribal Communities

Tuesday June 21st, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

  • Part 3-Protecting Tribal Data, Knowledge & Other Types of Property

Wednesday June 22nd, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

Training Description:

Do you want to show the impact your project /programming is having?  Is meeting the technical evaluation reporting requirements while still including of culture within evaluation a challenge?  If so, this three-part webinar series is for you! Addressing scientific “rigor” of evaluation for “evidence-based” reports and including culturally-responsive evaluation IS possible!  This NEW three-part evaluation series training will give you the foundation that you need to become more comfortable with project or program evaluation.  Session 1 will give an overview of evaluation basics, commonly used evaluation designs by funders, and describes the important role of data collection and evaluation to the Tribal planning process and measuring long-term strategic impacts.  Session 2 expands on basic evaluation designs and offers innovative Indigenous and culturally and contextually responsive evaluation designs that can be used in Indigenous communities on the Reservation, in urban areas, or in rural contexts.  Session 3 concludes by discussion of evaluation ethics, protections, and strategies for keeping data, intellectual and cultural property with the Tribal Government or organization as they keep in control of their information and build research/evaluation partnerships with non-Tribal agencies and funding sources.  Many resources and concrete examples will be provided to deepen the meaning and applicability of each workshop’s content.

Training Objectives:

  • Part 1-Evaluation 101 and Importance for Tribal Planning & Infrastructure

Monday June 20th, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT | 1.5 hours

Evaluation 101 and Importance for Tribal Planning & Infrastructure

General overview on evaluation terms and commonly used evaluation designs by funding agencies (non-Tribal) is covered.  Connecting the important of data collection and evaluation to the tribal planning and measuring long term strategic impacts is also included.

  • Part 2-Evaluation Designs for Tribal Communities

Tuesday June 21st, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT | 1.5 hours

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation Designs

Information and tips to develop culturally responsive evaluation designs that can be used for Indigenous populations in the Reservation, rural, or urban context will be shared.  CR Indigenous evaluation expands on basic evaluation designs used by non-Tribal funding agencies and gives participants strategies that will meet the community’s cultural requirements as well as the funder’s technical or scientific requirements.

  • Part 3-Protecting Tribal Data, Knowledge & Other Types of Property

Wednesday June 22nd, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT | 1.5 hours

Protecting Tribal Data, Knowledge, & Intellectual or Cultural Property

Identify and document best practices to help organizations protect their Tribal data, knowledge, intellectual and/or cultural property. Then learn how to obtain positive change and leverage resources with said data. Information on how to assist Tribal Governments or organizations in maintaining control of their information by learning about; Indigenous evaluation ethics, protections, strategies for keeping data, addressing intellectual and cultural property rights.  Strategies for finding and building research/evaluation partnerships with non-Tribal agencies and funding sources will also be shared.

Objectives (overall):

  1. Participants will understand basic evaluations, designs, and purposes.
  2. Participants will understand the role of data collection and evaluation on Tribal planning and measuring long term strategic impacts.
  3. Participants will understand what an Indigenous and culturally responsive evaluation design is and how to use culture within a larger basic evaluation design to meet community and funder’s needs for evaluation.
  4. Participants will be aware and have examples and resources for Tribal protection of data, including: cultural and intellectual property protections, sample Tribal IRB policies, and example data sharing agreements so Tribal participants can effectively negotiate with non-Tribal research or evaluation partners and non-Tribal funding agencies.