NIH Informational/Consultation Session on Tribal Interests in Research Involving Human Participants

Please see below for an announcement of NIH’s Informational/Consultation Session on Tribal Interest in Research Involving Human Participants. This will be held on Thursday, February 23rd.

NIH will host an informational/consultation session on Thursday, February 23, 2017 from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Eastern Time on tribal interests in research involving human participants.

NIH staff will briefly review the NIH’s role in advancing research and in assuring the protection of individuals and populations participating in NIH-funded research. Staff will then address any questions and seek the perspectives of participating tribal members. Participating tribal members will then be asked to provide information and perspectives on the integration of tradition and culture in research design and conduct and partnering with tribes in those research activities.

This informational/consultation session will be held via web conference with a toll-free conference line available. Tribal leaders and participants may obtain the login information and agenda from the NIH Tribal Health Research Office website: https://dpcpsi.nih.gov/thro. Please see attached for the Dear Tribal Leader Letter.

Building Relationships with Tribes

The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) provides unique opportunities for states, districts, and tribes to work together to strengthen education for Native students throughout the country. The National Indian Education Association (NIEA), a powerful national educational organization, presents a clear path and framework for consultancy between tribes and school districts as well as state educational departments as mandated by law. To initiate the critical work together, NIEA is poised to support state and local agencies as they navigate the long and sometimes tragic relationship between this country and Native communities to increase opportunities for successful consultation and engagement with them. Developed in partnership with tribes, tribal education advocates, and membership of the NIEA, this resource is meant to provide states and districts the high level strategies necessary to build trusting, reciprocal, and long-lasting relationships with the Native communities in their respective regions.

Read it all here!

Registration Open for WIEA 2017 Conference!

2017 Conference Registration is Now Open!
The Wisconsin Indian Education Association is pleased to announce that registration for the 2017 conference has officially opened along with the launch of our new website!
This year’s conference titled, Mino-Ayaa ‘Idiiwin: “Let’s Be Healthy Together”, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua.
The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.
The 2017 WIEA Conference will feature keynote addresses by Ahinwake Rose, Executive Director, National Indian Education Association; Dr. Ricky White, Superintendent, Circle of Life Academy, White Earth, MN;  Mr. Justin Kii Huenemann, President & CEO, Notah Begay III Foundation; and Dr. Jim Bouche, Principal/District Administrator, Lakeland Union High School, Minocqua, WI.
Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to experience all that’s great in American Indian education!

Wisconsin Funding Opportunity Announcement

corporation-for-national-and-community-service-cncsThe Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) is announcing the availability of a Notice of Funding Availability in the state of Wisconsin for the Senior Corps Foster Grandparent Program (FGP).  The competition is open to eligible applicants such as public agencies, including Indian tribes, and non-profit private organizations, both secular and faith-based.  

The Foster Grandparent Program engages adults age 55 and over to provide experienced tutors and mentors to children and youth with special and exceptional needs who will benefit from the one-on-one attention that an FGP volunteer can provide. 

In support of this competition, three in-person technical assistance events are planned. 

Thursday, October 27
12:30 – 3:30 pm
United Way of Marathon County
705 S. 24th Ave
Wausau, WI 54401 

Friday, October 28
8:00 – 11:00 am
Festival Food Store
1355 Oneida Street
Appleton, WI 54914 

Friday, October 28
1:00 – 4:00 pm
Greater Milwaukee Foundation
101 W. Pleasant Street Suite 219
Milwaukee, WI 53202

Please RSVP to the CNCS Wisconsin State Office at WI@cns.gov to ensure adequate space and materials preparation.

Applications are due by Wednesday, December 9, 2016.  

Visit www.nationalservice.gov/SeniorCorps_Replacement_Grants to access the full Notice of Funding, additional technical assistance information, and other resources on this funding opportunity.

Webinar! Indigenous Evaluation 101: Designing Evaluations that Are Culturally Responsive & Scientifically Rigorous

webinar imageIndigenous Evaluation 101:  Designing Evaluations that Are Culturally Responsive & Scientifically Rigorous Three Part Webinar

Webinar website

  • Part 1-Evaluation 101 and Importance for Tribal Planning & Infrastructure

Monday June 20th, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

  • Part 2-Evaluation Designs for Tribal Communities

Tuesday June 21st, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

  • Part 3-Protecting Tribal Data, Knowledge & Other Types of Property

Wednesday June 22nd, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

Training Description:

Do you want to show the impact your project /programming is having?  Is meeting the technical evaluation reporting requirements while still including of culture within evaluation a challenge?  If so, this three-part webinar series is for you! Addressing scientific “rigor” of evaluation for “evidence-based” reports and including culturally-responsive evaluation IS possible!  This NEW three-part evaluation series training will give you the foundation that you need to become more comfortable with project or program evaluation.  Session 1 will give an overview of evaluation basics, commonly used evaluation designs by funders, and describes the important role of data collection and evaluation to the Tribal planning process and measuring long-term strategic impacts.  Session 2 expands on basic evaluation designs and offers innovative Indigenous and culturally and contextually responsive evaluation designs that can be used in Indigenous communities on the Reservation, in urban areas, or in rural contexts.  Session 3 concludes by discussion of evaluation ethics, protections, and strategies for keeping data, intellectual and cultural property with the Tribal Government or organization as they keep in control of their information and build research/evaluation partnerships with non-Tribal agencies and funding sources.  Many resources and concrete examples will be provided to deepen the meaning and applicability of each workshop’s content.

Training Objectives:

  • Part 1-Evaluation 101 and Importance for Tribal Planning & Infrastructure

Monday June 20th, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT | 1.5 hours

Evaluation 101 and Importance for Tribal Planning & Infrastructure

General overview on evaluation terms and commonly used evaluation designs by funding agencies (non-Tribal) is covered.  Connecting the important of data collection and evaluation to the tribal planning and measuring long term strategic impacts is also included.

  • Part 2-Evaluation Designs for Tribal Communities

Tuesday June 21st, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT | 1.5 hours

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation Designs

Information and tips to develop culturally responsive evaluation designs that can be used for Indigenous populations in the Reservation, rural, or urban context will be shared.  CR Indigenous evaluation expands on basic evaluation designs used by non-Tribal funding agencies and gives participants strategies that will meet the community’s cultural requirements as well as the funder’s technical or scientific requirements.

  • Part 3-Protecting Tribal Data, Knowledge & Other Types of Property

Wednesday June 22nd, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT | 1.5 hours

Protecting Tribal Data, Knowledge, & Intellectual or Cultural Property

Identify and document best practices to help organizations protect their Tribal data, knowledge, intellectual and/or cultural property. Then learn how to obtain positive change and leverage resources with said data. Information on how to assist Tribal Governments or organizations in maintaining control of their information by learning about; Indigenous evaluation ethics, protections, strategies for keeping data, addressing intellectual and cultural property rights.  Strategies for finding and building research/evaluation partnerships with non-Tribal agencies and funding sources will also be shared.

Objectives (overall):

  1. Participants will understand basic evaluations, designs, and purposes.
  2. Participants will understand the role of data collection and evaluation on Tribal planning and measuring long term strategic impacts.
  3. Participants will understand what an Indigenous and culturally responsive evaluation design is and how to use culture within a larger basic evaluation design to meet community and funder’s needs for evaluation.
  4. Participants will be aware and have examples and resources for Tribal protection of data, including: cultural and intellectual property protections, sample Tribal IRB policies, and example data sharing agreements so Tribal participants can effectively negotiate with non-Tribal research or evaluation partners and non-Tribal funding agencies.