Dr. Bowman to present, “Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation”

Dr. Nicole Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman

Dr. Bowman to present, “Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation” at National Indian Education Association 2016 Convention & Trade Show.

Convention website

Convention agenda

Convention registration

NIEA 2016 Session, Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation

  • Presenter:
    • Nicole R. Bowman (Mohican/Munsee, Research/Evaluation – Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, President – Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC)

 Friday, October 7, 2016 | 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm PST | Room: Nevada 7

Convention agenda

 From the session abstract: “An overview of the Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation (CRIE) model that can be used in tribal or public education and other contexts will be shared. CRIE is a straight forward framework to give participants strategies for inclusion of culture, language, community context, and sovereignty when evaluating policies, programs, or grant projects. Expect an interactive and caring session with many free resources to help you get started on or expand your existing evaluation work.”

Dr. Bowman was Keynote for Jazzin’ at the Shedd!

john-g-shedd-aquarium-91On September 14th, Dr. Nicole Bowman was the Keynote for Jazzin’ at the Shedd!
NICOLE BOWMAN ON CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE INDIGENOUS EVALUATION + JAZZIN’ AT THE SHEDD

About the Event

The Chicagoland Evaluation Association is pleased to present Nicole Bowman, Chair of the AEA Topical Interest Group “Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation” and President/Owner of Bowman Performance Consulting. She will be presenting on Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: Beyond Culture and Language to Nation and Relation Building. We’re also very excited to have the Shedd Evaluation team present our their ongoing projects as well!

Add this to your Reading List!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

Pick up this Evaluation Book with a Chapter by Dr. Bowman!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

Evaluation Book Reviewed by Teachers College Record

new book picA review of Dr. Stafford’s book with a chapter by Dr. Bowman, Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice, was published in the prestigious Teachers College Record.

Teachers College Record, Date Published: June 22, 2016
http://www.tcrecord.org ID Number: 21288, Date Accessed: 7/1/2016 9:06:14 AM

http://www.tcrecord.org/Content.asp?ContentID=21288

Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice

reviewed by Dhani Shah — June 22, 2016

Title: Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice
Author(s): Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson & Henry Frierson
Publisher: Information Age Publishing, Charlotte
ISBN: 1623969352, Pages: 404, Year: 2014
Search for book at Amazon.com

Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson’s edited book, Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice, advocates that cultural, racial, and ethnic diversity is one of the most salient features of contemporary society. Hence, they believe it is the right time for Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE), “evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity that are actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their academic performance goals” (p. xiii). The focus of CRE is studying the context, history, and culture of an evaluated program and its participants and includes Indigenous communities in decision making throughout the evaluation. Thus, CRE is a theoretical, conceptual, and inherently political evaluation model that brings culture to the forefront in evaluation theory and practice. CRE emphasizes evaluation practice, which aims to achieve social justice and “address human bias through inclusion, relationships, and an orientation to context” (p. 180). Generally, human bias is based on our values, relationships, decisions, context, and culture and it can undermine the validity of evaluation processes. CRE keeps in mind the cultural beliefs, practices, norms, and values of any specific culture in which an evaluation is being implemented.

This book is an extension of introductory work on CRE. Back in 2005, the same three editors (Hood, Hopson, and Frierson) published a book titled, The Role of Culture and Cultural Context: A Mandate for Inclusion, the Discovery of Truth, and Understanding in Evaluative Theory and Practice (2005). In the initial version of this book the authors had “reflected the rapidly emerging and frequently contentious discourse on this topic (Culturally Responsive Evaluation) during the early years of this new millennium” (Hood, Hopson, & Frierson, 2015, p. xi).

Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture is organized into five distinct sections including: a) “CRE Theoretical and Historical Legacies and Extensions,” b) “Evaluators’ Journeys of Introspection and Self-Exploration,” c) “Applications of CRE in Global and Indigenous School Contexts,” d) “Claiming New Territories of CRE: Culturally Specific Methods, Approaches, and Ecologies,” and e) “Epilogue.” In total, 50 experienced contributors have authored 17 chapters within these five book sections. This review treats this text holistically.

The initial chapters are devoted to setting the background for the CRE model which comprises understanding program context, engaging stakeholders, identifying the purpose(s) of evaluation, framing evaluation questions, designing an evaluation, selecting instruments, and collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data. Extending this discussion, the book deliberates the need for a systems approach to CRE practices and suggests using a system evaluation protocol (SEP) framework. System evaluation “refers to the assessment of functions, products, outcomes, and impacts of a system (set of programs, activities, or interventions)” (Trochim et al., 2012, p. 1).

After setting the stage for CRE, the book discusses the concept of validity in CRE; describing that historically validity is defined by dominant groups and has remained a powerful tool for establishing their legitimization. However, as per the Indigenous Evaluation Framework (IEF), validity does not necessarily have the same meaning across different cultural contexts. The authors in Chapter Three argue that although culture-free assessment has long been abandoned, “meaningful inclusion of culture in validation has not consistently followed” (p. 51).

The book includes a thorough discussion about different CRE methods, strategies, and frameworks by giving several examples of evaluation studies in different Indigenous cultural communities across the world. The book dedicates five chapters to CRE practices for MāoriIndigenous communities in Antearoa, New Zealand. The chapter authors also reflect on how a replication of these practices can be conducted for Indigenous communities in the U.S. and elsewhere. These chapters state that engagement and relationship-building rituals have a prime importance in Māori culture and are “grounded in relational trust and acceptance” (p. 95). Therefore, developmental evaluation practice, which is based on the respect of local cultures, their voices, and acknowledgement of cultural strengths, is a favored approach for the evaluation of Māori projects.

Furthermore, the book depicts the Kaupapa Māori (Māori way) paradigm. “Kaupapa Māori evaluation is an assertion of the right of Māori to conduct culturally responsive evaluations that are by, with and for Māori (p. 296). Likewise, Kaupapa Māori relates to a worldview that the Māori people bring to evaluation; it is prescribed in their cultural terms and supports Māori development, societal transformation, and decolonization. Māori evaluators typically have different axiological, ontological, and epistemological foundations than western-oriented evaluators.

In Chapter Ten, authors O’Hara, McNamara, and Harrison share that CRE also has implications for educational assessment methods. Their discussion starts with a study aimed at investigating educational assessment in a multicultural Irish society. The traditional evaluation practices in Irish schools are based on an inflexible model that is exclusive of CRE practices. Irish teachers consider the traditional assessment neither culturally responsive nor sensitive. They share that they are trained as teachers to push students through a public end-of-schooling examination that is predominantly Irish and relates to Irish culture. Every child is assessed on the same model even if he or she comes from a different culture. Therefore, the assessment is not based on the principles of multiculturalism and the Irish system would not serve ethnic minorities in the country very well.

This book is a very serious effort at advocating for the importance, understanding, and application of CRE. Different case studies, descriptions of several projects and programs in several Indigenous communities of New Zealand, the U.S. and other global contexts explain that CRE is one vehicle by which to conduct culture- and context-friendly evaluation practices. The book contains notes and a glossary at the end of several chapters to help the reader understand the context but it does not contain any corresponding exercises.

Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context is written using technical and theoretical language and may pose challenges for some readers. Nevertheless, the book is a great in-depth resource for researchers, evaluators, practitioners, students, and teachers who are engaged in anthropological and ethnographic teaching, research, and evaluation. It systematically advocates the case for CRE, its framework, importance, relevance, and applicability in a culturally diverse world.

Reference

Hood, S., Hopson, R., & Frierson, H. (2005). The role of culture and cultural context: A mandate for inclusion, the discovery of truth, and understanding in evaluative theory and practice. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Trochim, W., Urban, J. B., Hargraves, M., Hebbard, C., Buckley, J., Archibald, T., Johnson, M.,

& Burgermaster, M. (2012). The guide to the systems evaluation protocol. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Digital Print Services.

Dr. Bowman Spotlighted on Wisconsin Center for Education Research Newsletter!

uw newsletter circle bowmanDr. Bowman was spotlighted on Wisconsin Center for Education Research’s newsletter. She was congratulated for her appointment to LEAD Center.

About WCER

The Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s highly ranked public School of Education is one of the first and most productive education research centers in the world. It has assisted scholars and practitioners develop, submit, conduct and share grant-funded education research for more than 50 years.

WCER’s mission is to improve educational outcomes for diverse student populations, impact education practice positively and foster collaborations among academic disciplines and practitioners.

WCER is an incubator for advances in education policy and practice. It provides services and resources for UW–Madison researchers, graduate students and their collaborators, as well as educators, fundersand communities locally and around the world.

*Learn more at http://www.wcer.wisc.edu/

About LEAD

At The LEAD Center, We advance the quality of teaching and learning by evaluating the effectiveness and impact of educational innovations, policies, and practices within higher education. Rigorous, theory-driven methods and interdisciplinary collaborations anchor our approach to evaluation, leading to the adaptation and dissemination of evidence-based strategies in service to student learning.

*Learn more at http://lead.wceruw.org/

Sign up for Dr. Bowman’s E-Fundraising Webinar!

dani and nickyE-Fundraising: A Guide to Research & Fundraising Methods Online

Nicole R. Bowman, Ph.D. & Dani Ebert

Tuesday June 14th, 2016 | 1:00 pm -2:00 pm CDT |

Webinar website

Training Description:

In the now technology-centered world we live in, online fundraising is becoming more and more popular as a resource to raise funds. Fundraising online through e-mails, social media, or by other technology and internet-based strategies allows you to reach a broader audience and is more cost effective vs. traditional fundraising methods. In this webinar, participants will learn the differences between traditional and online fundraising and how online fundraising can benefit you and your organization. Participants will be provided with tools and resources to find and acquire funds using the internet through a fundraising methods handout and a template to help prioritize your organization’s fundraising needs.

Training Objectives:
A general overview of online fundraising followed by tips and tutorials on researching for e-fundraising methods to find what works best for you and your organization.  Objectives:

  1. Participants will understand what online fundraising is, the many methods for online fundraising, and the benefits of using the internet and technology to support fundraising efforts.
  2. Participants will be able to use online research strategies to find different methods of e-fundraising.
  3. Participants will be aware of and make better decisions about what types of e-fundraising will be the most feasible and effective for them and their organizations.

Tomorrow! Dr. Bowman with Dr. Beverly Anderson Parsons (InSites) “Addressing Structural Racism through Systems-Oriented Evaluation”

Dr. Parsons

Dr. Parsons

CREA 2016 Symposium Session, Addressing Structural Racism through Systems-Oriented Evaluation, Patricia Jessup (Jessup & Associates), chair. What Evaluators Need to Know About Structural Racism, Nicole R. Bowman (Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC) & Beverly Anderson Parsons (InSites), presenters.

April 21, 2016 | 10:00 am – 11:30 am | Room: Chicago

Conference program

From the symposium abstract: “The session includes a description of four evaluation designs that are being incorporated into the evaluation guidebook. The designs highlight critical points in the complex and often unpredictable processes of changing the basic paradigms on which our social systems are built in regard to race. The designs are grounded within communities but reach inward and outward from that pivotal point with attention to honoring all voices. Investment design, implementation, and evaluation all work together to increase racial equity that generates significant practical returns in the form of improved social and economic outcomes for vulnerable populations.”

2016 Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) International Conference

April 20-22, 2016 | Chicago, IL

Conference website

Conference schedule

From the website: CREA 3rd International Conference The Next Generation of Theory and Practice: Rethinking Equity through Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment will demonstrate the kinds of interventions in education, health care, criminal justice, and social services that are being undertaken to address inequities. What has been attempted? What are the results? What works for whom, why, and in what circumstances? This year’s theme includes, broadening participation in STEM and beyond; capacity building in global and local communities and neighborhoods; development of equitable measures, methods and metrics; policies and practices of influence and consequence; and examples of effective models of collaborations and networks.”

“Promising Practices in Tribally Driven Participatory Research” Presented by Dr. Bowman

IMG_1229Dr. Nicole Bowman-Farrell will present “Promising Practices in Tribally Driven Participatory Research: An Effective Model for Tribal and Non-Tribal Research Partnerships”, at the 3rd International Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) conference that will be held April 20-22, 2016 at the Chicago Palmer House Hilton hotel.

Session Details:
Session Title: Paper 5b: Perspectives In Evaluation Training, Thinking And Practice
Date and Time: 22/Apr/2016, 9:00am – 10:30am

Registration and more info:

http://education.illinois.edu/CREA/conference

 

See Dr. Bowman and Dr. Cram at a CREA CRIE PreConference Workshop

dr cram dr bowmanDr. Nicole Bowman and Dr. Fiona Cram will be presenting at CREA’s 3rd International Conference “The Next Generation of Theory and Practice: Rethinking Equity through Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment”

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation (CRIE): Indigenous Knowledge, Frameworks, & Case Studies to Inform/Transform Evaluation Practice

The workshop will provide real-world application of Indigenous Evaluation models, strategies, and tools using examples of collaborative models for working with Indigenous organizations and communities.

*Sign up today!

*CREA Conference Website