5th Annual CRCAIH Summit archived presentations NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE

Did you miss the Summit this year?

Is there a presentation you’d like to hear again?

Now you can!

We are pleased to announce that the presentation videos and slides from the 2017 Summit are now archived on our website! Click on the button below to see archived presentations from our incredible lineup of speakers!

2017 Archive

You can also find archived presentations from the preconference workshops.

Workshops

Knowing Our Neighbors: Wisconsin American Indian Nations and Tribal Communities

February 21, 2017

Holiday Inn Stevens Point – Convention Center

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Event Description
Understanding the Wisconsin American Indian educational experience and perspectives has profound implications for both district policies and instructional methodology when transforming systems to educate all students. Through counter-narratives shared by American Indians, learn about the rights, responsibilities, and misinformation surrounding Native people and education.

Apply the Courageous Conversations protocols to examine, recognize and appropriately address the American Indian students’ struggles and emotions connected with educational assimilation; and understand the concepts of “invisible identity” and “walking in two worlds.”

NEW Spring eCourse Offering: Wisconsin American Indian Studies

About the eCourse
The eCourse for Wisconsin American Indian Studies provides an overview to American Indian history, culture, and tribal sovereignty in the state of Wisconsin. This eCourse is designed to introduce both historical and contemporary issues regarding tribal nations and communities within Wisconsin.
Topics dealt with during the course include: early history, the history, the social organization and contemporary condition of Wisconsin’s American Indian people, communities, and nations. Tribal nations and communities highlighted throughout the eCourse include the Chippewa or Ojibwe, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Potawatomi, Oneida, Stockbridge-Munsee Mohican, Brothertown, and Urban Indians.
For further information about the eCourse requirements, grading, schedule of readings, and homework, please visit the Wisconsin American Indian Studies eCourse web page.

Register Today! Addressing the American Indian Student Achievement Gap in Wisconsin Workshop!

 

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Register today the American Indian Student Achievement Gap in Wisconsin Workshop presented by The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network. There will be 4 offerings of this workshop throughout Wisconsin. The 1st offering is November 1st at Lake of the Torches Resort in Lac du Flambeau.

As a result of participating in this training, attendees will:

  • Have an increased understanding of American Indian student achievement in Wisconsin and the use of data to improve results for students
  • Be provided with an experience that integrates CCSS math standards with CRT and provide a lens for making schools more constructive places for Native children
  • Have increased knowledge of culturally relevant teaching strategies that have positive learning impact for all students
  • Receive useful and helpful resources for “continuing the work”

Register here: http://login.myquickreg.com/register/event/event.cfm?eventid=16375

CREA Partners with Evaluation 2016 in Atlanta

BPC is very pleased to announce CREA’s second partnership with AEA to provide another outstanding  thread of pre-conference workshops pertinent to culturally responsive evaluation. Dr. Bowman will be a part of CREA’s team of presenters. Please take a look and we hope to see you there.

CREA Education Comes to Atlanta through Evaluation 2016

The Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) has partnered with the American Evaluation Association (AEA) to offer a unique thread of professional development training options as part of the pre- and post-conference professional development workshops during Evaluation 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. CREA has created six workshop opportunities that focus on evaluation theory, methods, and practice grounded in culturally responsive evaluation.

CREA Professional Development Workshops

Contemporary Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Latino Communities
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 | 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Presenters: Leah Christina Neubauer and Lisa Aponte-Soto

This workshop will focus on contemporary culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) practice with Latino communities. Latinos are the fastest growing population in the United States, accounting for 16.3 percent of the total population (2010 census). CRE with multinational, racial, and ethnic Latino communities demands highly skilled evaluators who can employ evaluation approaches which align and support diverse perspectives in all evaluation phases. The session will begin with a brief history of social justice oriented evaluation theories, CRE, and Latino Critical Race Theory (LatCrit). This paradigmatic framing will provide a foundation to discuss the nine-step CRE process in action with Latino communities. Facilitators will highlight synthesized literature and draw on their own indigenous praxis-oriented perspectives. Participants should come prepared to ‘dig deep’ and share their experiences with Latino-focused evaluation planning and practice.

Foundations of Culturally Responsive Evaluation
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Rodney K. Hopson and Karen E. Kirkhart

This workshop addresses theoretical foundations of Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE) and the strategies that operationalize it in evaluation practice. Following opening introductions, presenters set the context with a brief history of how the evaluation profession is coming to a clearer appreciation of the centrality of culture. Against this backdrop, the history of CRE’s development is highlighted and key theoretical elements are identified. The workshop then transitions from theory to practice in three segments. The first segment pairs analysis of evaluation contexts with reflections on one’s own cultural location as an evaluator. This prepares participants to consider methods that are culturally congruent with their contexts of practice, noting potential strengths and limitations of each. CRE values the return of benefit to the community, and the third segment examines both methods and issues in communicating findings. Presenters pair examples from the literature with participants’ own examples to connect workshop content with participants’ contexts, interests, and concerns. The closing segment returns to Big Picture issues such as the fundamental grounding of CRE in social justice and how this poses important metaevaluation questions that connect to both ethics and validity.

Original Instructions: Utilizing Indigenous Knowledge, Frameworks, & Case Studies to Inform & Transform Evaluation Practice
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Fiona Cram and Nicole R. Bowman

This workshop focuses on the culturally responsive evaluation of services and programs provided for and/or designed by Indigenous peoples. The workshop is structured to answer three key questions in Indigenous Evaluation (IE): 1.) Who should undertake IE? 2.) What do evaluators need to understand about Indigenous contexts? How should IE be done?

Cultural Responsiveness and Mixed Methods Research
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Presenters: Jori Hall

This engaging half-day workshop presents an introduction to mixed methods research, focusing on cultural responsiveness. Participants will explore key principles of cultural responsiveness and consider how these principles can be applied to mixed methods research. Topics covered related to mixed methods research include the benefits and challenges of mixed methods; when to use mixed methods; paradigmatic issues; research design conceptualization; and data integration. By attending the workshop, participants will be better able to apply cultural responsive understandings to the crafting of their own mixed methods project.

Culturally Relevant Evaluation and Research from a Quantitative Perspective
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Toks Fashola

This workshop will address culturally relevant and evaluative research from a quantitative perspective. The workshop seeks to engage the workshop participants in the process of creating a culturally relevant topic, and exploring quantitative ways to address this topic. The process will involve creating culturally relevant and quantitatively sound methods to create constructs, surveys, data dictionaries, and to administer enter, and interpret data. The outcome(s) will help to create and produce data that are not only rigorous and robust, but also data that can address topics of social justice, culturally relevant evaluation, and theories of change. The workshop will use some examples of projects that currently exist, and projects that are in progress. Workshop participants will be encouraged and guided to become informed consumers of quantitative research.

Utilization of a Racial Equity Lens to help Guide Strategic Engagement and Evaluation
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Paul Elam, Willard Walker, and LaShaune Johnson

This workshop focuses on the practical use of a racial equity lens when conducting evaluation. The framework argues that culture and race are important considerations when conducting an evaluation because we believe that there are both critical and substantive nuances that are often missed, ignored, and/or misinterpreted when an evaluator is not aware of the culture of those being evaluated. Participants will be provided with a Template for Analyzing Programs through a Culturally Responsive and Racial Equity Lens, designed to focus deliberately on an evaluation process that takes race, culture, equity, and community context into consideration.

Register for Evaluation 2016 and learn more about the CREA workshops by visiting the Evaluation 2016 website.

Dr. Reinhardt and Dr. Bowman to present at NIEA!

Check out Dr. Bowman’s session to take place Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at NIEA, Pre-Convention!

Utilizing a Tri-Lateral Model Approach to Revitalize Tribal Education Systems

Dr. Nicole Bowman, Bowman Performance Consulting and Dr. Martin Reinhardt, Northern Michigan University

Description:  Western approaches to tribal and public education policy and programming results in gaps in services, poor resource allocation, inappropriate programming, and chronic education system failure, resulting in unmet American Indian (AI) education needs. This pre-convention workshop introduces a tri-lateral educational model that tribal governments can use to build their own model for Indian education. Using data and lessons learned from previous tri-lateral studies, participants will consider key components of a tri-lateral model, an overview of studies with key findings, and discussion/work time to process how the tri-lateral model may help them study their own educational ordinances, policies, and practices to build capacities and systems of support for Indian education in their own community.   Building stronger tribal/public government systems of support for achieving the vision of developing a true tri-lateral (tribal, federal, state) responsibility to improve the educational success of American Indian students is possible.  Attend this pre-convention workshop and be prepared to learn from one another and share ideas, resources, and practical strategies for a better tomorrow.

Time: 9 – 4:30pm (7.5 hours)
Room: Carson 4

*Register Now! https://niea.site-ym.com/Login.aspx?optional=1&store=1&returl=%2fstore%2fRenewMembership.aspx

Dr. Reinhardt’s Tri-Lateral Model to be Discussed Pre-Convention at NIEA!

Dr. Marty Reinhardt

Dr. Marty Reinhardt

Check out Dr. Reinhardt and Dr. Bowman’s session to take place Wednesday, October 5, 2016 at NIEA, Pre-Convention!

Utilizing a Tri-Lateral Model Approach to Revitalize Tribal Education Systems

Dr. Nicole Bowman, Bowman Performance Consulting and Dr. Martin Reinhardt, Northern Michigan University

Description:  Western approaches to tribal and public education policy and programming results in gaps in services, poor resource allocation, inappropriate programming, and chronic education system failure, resulting in unmet American Indian (AI) education needs. This pre-convention workshop introduces a tri-lateral educational model that tribal governments can use to build their own model for Indian education. Using data and lessons learned from previous tri-lateral studies, participants will consider key components of a tri-lateral model, an overview of studies with key findings, and discussion/work time to process how the tri-lateral model may help them study their own educational ordinances, policies, and practices to build capacities and systems of support for Indian education in their own community.   Building stronger tribal/public government systems of support for achieving the vision of developing a true tri-lateral (tribal, federal, state) responsibility to improve the educational success of American Indian students is possible.  Attend this pre-convention workshop and be prepared to learn from one another and share ideas, resources, and practical strategies for a better tomorrow.

Time: 9 – 4:30pm (7.5 hours)
Room: Carson 4

*Register Now! https://niea.site-ym.com/Login.aspx?optional=1&store=1&returl=%2fstore%2fRenewMembership.aspx

National Indian Education Association Pre Convention Tribal Ed Presentation Announced!

Dr. Marty Reinhardt

Dr. Marty Reinhardt

NIEA announces Pre-Convention Meetings and Focus Forums! Check out Dr. Bowman’s session to take place Wednesday, October 5, 2016.

Utilizing a Tri-Lateral Model Approach to Revitalize Tribal Education Systems

Dr. Nicole Bowman, Bowman Performance Consulting and Dr. Martin Reinhardt, Northern Michigan University

Description:  Western approaches to tribal and public education policy and programming results in gaps in services, poor resource allocation, inappropriate programming, and chronic education system failure, resulting in unmet American Indian (AI) education needs. This pre-convention workshop introduces a tri-lateral educational model that tribal governments can use to build their own model for Indian education. Using data and lessons learned from previous tri-lateral studies, participants will consider key components of a tri-lateral model, an overview of studies with key findings, and discussion/work time to process how the tri-lateral model may help them study their own educational ordinances, policies, and practices to build capacities and systems of support for Indian education in their own community.   Building stronger tribal/public government systems of support for achieving the vision of developing a true tri-lateral (tribal, federal, state) responsibility to improve the educational success of American Indian students is possible.  Attend this pre-convention workshop and be prepared to learn from one another and share ideas, resources, and practical strategies for a better tomorrow.

Time: 9 – 4:30pm (7.5 hours)
Room: Carson 4

*Register Now! https://niea.site-ym.com/Login.aspx?optional=1&store=1&returl=%2fstore%2fRenewMembership.aspx

Don’t Miss Dr. Bowman on CREA’s 2016 Panel Presentation Tomorrow!

crealogoCREA 2016 Panel Presentation, Being Culturally Responsive: Discerning When, Where, and How Cultural Familiarity Counts. Melvin Hall (Northern Arizona University), chair. Nicole R. Bowman (Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC), Wanda Casillas (Deloitte Consulting), Fiona Cram (Centre for Social Impact, New Zealand), Rodney Hopson (George Mason University), & Hazel Symonette (University of Wisconsin-Madison), presenters.

April 22, 2016 | 10:45am – 12:15pm | Room: Salon 2
Conference program

From the paper abstract: “As part of the last CREA Conference, a panel of culturally responsive evaluators explored the personal traits and experiences that helped to shape their worldview and dispositions toward evaluation. As a follow up to that session, an expanded panel will again explore interactions between the personal, professional, and community commitments that influence how an evaluator does their work. We begin the discussion with examining the dynamics when an evaluator works in a community they know well, and then extend the analysis to the situation where they work in similar but distant communities. When working in your community of origin, in what understandings can you place confidence during an attempt to be culturally responsive? How far from a familiar home base, can or should the evaluator feel confident of their ability to be responsive? When preparing to enter a familiar but distant space, what cautions might we suggest?”

Tomorrow! Dr. Bowman with Dr. Beverly Anderson Parsons (InSites) “Addressing Structural Racism through Systems-Oriented Evaluation”

Dr. Parsons

Dr. Parsons

CREA 2016 Symposium Session, Addressing Structural Racism through Systems-Oriented Evaluation, Patricia Jessup (Jessup & Associates), chair. What Evaluators Need to Know About Structural Racism, Nicole R. Bowman (Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC) & Beverly Anderson Parsons (InSites), presenters.

April 21, 2016 | 10:00 am – 11:30 am | Room: Chicago

Conference program

From the symposium abstract: “The session includes a description of four evaluation designs that are being incorporated into the evaluation guidebook. The designs highlight critical points in the complex and often unpredictable processes of changing the basic paradigms on which our social systems are built in regard to race. The designs are grounded within communities but reach inward and outward from that pivotal point with attention to honoring all voices. Investment design, implementation, and evaluation all work together to increase racial equity that generates significant practical returns in the form of improved social and economic outcomes for vulnerable populations.”

2016 Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) International Conference

April 20-22, 2016 | Chicago, IL

Conference website

Conference schedule

From the website: CREA 3rd International Conference The Next Generation of Theory and Practice: Rethinking Equity through Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment will demonstrate the kinds of interventions in education, health care, criminal justice, and social services that are being undertaken to address inequities. What has been attempted? What are the results? What works for whom, why, and in what circumstances? This year’s theme includes, broadening participation in STEM and beyond; capacity building in global and local communities and neighborhoods; development of equitable measures, methods and metrics; policies and practices of influence and consequence; and examples of effective models of collaborations and networks.”