Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEMBER 1, 2017

CONTACT:

Brian Jackson

President

Wisconsin Indian Education Association

Office: (715) 588-3800

Email: brian.jackson@ldfschool.org

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November

Organization issues open Call-to-Action to strengthen relations, address disparities faced by American Indians and ending the use of race based mascots.

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is proud to celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November. On August 3, 1990, President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. The Bill reads in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities.” Every year since, the Office of the President has issued a proclamation supporting the month as such. The landmark Bill honors America’s indigenous people.

In keeping with the essence of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association honors the unique culture, history and perseverance of the 11 federally recognized tribal nations within the state, as well as all Native nations across both North and South America.

WIEA President Brian Jackson says the organization is calling on tribal, state and local governments, public and private schools, tribal education programs and departments and civic groups alike to implement curriculum that strengthen educational offerings about Indigenous peoples in Wisconsin.

“For hundreds of years, American Indian history has been obscured, altered and in many instances erased from existence,” said Jackson. “It has long been a mission of WIEA to educate our non-Indian neighbors to the valuable contributions of Native Americans over the course of American history — many of which have allowed this country to attain a level of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by so many,” added Jackson.

As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is issuing a call to action to address three main areas in closing the cultural divide while increasing the socioeconomic, educational and political position of Wisconsin’s tribal nations:

  • An open challenge to local governments, schools, civic organizations and individuals to learn more about the historical and contemporary connections of your local community to neighboring tribes and tribal communities in general.
  • Request that school districts employing race-based mascots develop an exit strategy away from the use of American Indian or other race based imagery within one (1) year. This request is especially critical if a school within the district you reside or a school within your school’s athletic conference currently uses a race based mascot.
  • Contact your legislator(s) to request a repeal of the 2013 Wisconsin Act 115, which makes it nearly impossible for those who object to race-based mascots and sports team names to bring about change at their school district.

Over the nearly 25-year history of WIEA, the group has remained a catalyst in the effort to incorporate historically accurate Native American curriculum into Wisconsin public schools. The effort gained support when former Governor Jim Doyle (D) signed into law Wisconsin Act 31, which requires public schools to offer historically accurate instruction on American Indian tribes in the state. Act 31 was born as a result of the ugly and sometimes violent protests of the late 80s and early 90s organized by non-Indian groups opposed to Chippewa Treaty Rights. Ultimately, District Judge Barbara Crabb ruled in favor of tribal spearers who sought a permanent injunction prohibiting non-Indian protesters from interfering with their court affirmed Treaty Rights, finding the protests to be racially motivated.

In addition to the call-to-action initiatives, WIEA will participate in a National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots, which is scheduled for Friday, November 17, 2017. Tribes, communities, universities and groups across the country plan to hold local and national events. From documentaries and movie showings, to book readings and workshops, and cultural events, the National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots brings to the forefront the social issues caused by Indian and other race based mascots.

“We’re encouraging everyone to participate in American Indian Heritage Month along with the November 17th National Day-of-Action on Raced Based Mascots,” said Jackson. “We all have a responsibility to add to the quality of life in our respective communities. When we act in the spirit of cooperation and unity, we create the framework for a positive future for people of all races and cultures in Wisconsin and beyond.”

Jackson says that WIEA, along with the Indian Mascot and Logo Task Force, offer a host of educational resources that provide historically accurate, authentic information on Wisconsin’s Native nations. “Much of the general public’s views and misconceptions of American Indians is due to the lack of meaningful information,” said Jackson. “WIEA is open to partnering to provide materials, training, resources and information to any group or organization interesting in broadening their knowledge base on American Indians – that also includes widening their network and fostering positive relationships,” Jackson added.

The American Indian Heritage or Native American Heritage Month designation aims to provide a platform for Native people in the United States to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance and ways and concepts of life. This gives Native people and their allies the opportunity to express to their community, city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and cooperation in their local area.

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For additional resources visit any one of the following websites:

www.indianmascots.com

www.wiea.org

www.wisconsinact31.org

www.dpi.wi.gov/amind/state-statues

About the Wisconsin Indian Education Association

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian Educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council (GLITC) Education sub-committee.

The GLITC Education Committee began in the early 1970’s but was disbanded around 1983 because of a lack of funds.

A group of concerned Indian Educators began meeting in 1984 and after a series of meetings during that year, developed By-laws and a mission statement.

The group was formally organized in 1985 as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

The Association has seven regions throughout the State. Each region elects/appoints two representatives as WIEA Board members for a two-year term.

Each Region’s Board members are responsible for hosting a meeting in their region throughout the year to share and gather information for the Board to either act upon or disseminate to all other WIEA members.

The Board meets every month except December. Meetings are held in the various regions throughout the state in an effort to get input from the general membership regarding their issues and concerns.

Dr. Jolene Bowman Named President of NIEA

Dr. Jolene Bowman, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Vice President and WIEA Board Member to be sworn-in as NIEA President
Swearing in to take place on Saturday, October 7th at 48th Annual National Indian Education Association Convention & Trade Show in Orlando, FL

ORLANDO, FL – After waiting nearly a year to take her seat as the board president of the National Indian Education Association, Dr. Jolene Bowman will officially take the reigns this afternoon when she is sworn-in at the organization’s 48th Annual Convention & Trade Show at the Caribe Royal Orlando Hotel and Convention Center.

Dr. Bowman brings with her a strong presence and solid understanding of the issues facing American Indian students and communities. Hailing from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin, where she serves as the tribe’s governing board Vice President, Bowman has long been a proponent of widening the educational opportunities of American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

“I plan to use my new position to advocate for Indian education and Native students by getting in the know about the particular subject or issue students may be experiencing,” said Bowman. “I not only want to work through those challenges but also celebrate the accomplishments of our people.”

Bowman was elected president at last year’s NIEA convention held in Reno, NV. and has spent the last year building momentum for her new post through her work as both secretary for the organization and board member of the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

WIEA president Brian Jackson says he’s excited to see the impact Bowman will have on Indian education in Wisconsin and across the nation.

“I’m confident Dr. Bowman will continue NIEA’s efforts to increase educational opportunities for Native students everywhere,” said Jackson. “Women are the backbone of our Native communities. She has a strong sense of identity and has demonstrated her ability to lead through her previous successes working in tribal communities,” added Jackson, who traveled to Orlando in support of Bowman and Wisconsin Indian education.

One of Bowman’s first orders of business as NIEA president will be to address the growing funding needs of Indian education at the federal level.

“NIEA is the only organization that is exclusively working on behalf of native students to ensure that our trust responsibility is being upheld,” said Bowman, referring to the federal government’s treaty and trust responsibility to American Indian tribes.

“In the current context, Indian education was under attack in the last (federal) budget and NIEA will continue to work diligently to ensure our Native schools and Native student populations are funded,” Bowman added.

Bowman will serve a one (1) year term as board president, which will run concurrent to her other obligations in Wisconsin.

The 48th annual NIEA Convention & Tradeshow runs October 4 – 7, 2017, in Orlando, FL.

Let’s be Healthy in Minocqua!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!

WIEA is in May!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!

Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup – Coming to Minocqua on May 11, 2017!

Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup

Systems Changing to Do What is Best for Our Children

May 11, 2017

The Pointe Hotel & Suites | Minocqua

Purpose

This early childhood tribal networking event will provide opportunities for facilitators, presenters, and participants to share information, resources, best practices, and model programs.

As part of this workgroup, participants will:

  • participate in future planning to promote awareness of early childhood care and education for children and families in our communities
  • develop cross sector early childhood collaborations within each tribal community
  • promote broader collaborative work among all of the tribal communities and between the tribal communities and the state departments

Participant Outcomes

As an expansion of the Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup meetings, participants and others will:

  • hear motivational stories about early childhood collaborations within/between communities
  • be provided with resources from state agencies

Schedule, Fees, and Registration There are no fees associated with attending this training, but pre-registration is REQUIRED. Please visit http://www.MyQuickReg.com to register.

Tentative Schedule

• 8:00 am – 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast (provided)

• 8:30 am – 12:00 pm Morning Workshop: Motivational Partnership Stories and Resource Sharing

• 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Lunch (provided)

• 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Afternoon Workshop: Topical Presentations and Future Planning

MARK YOUR CALENDARS!! The next Early Childhood Tribal Workshop is tentatively scheduled for August 2017. For more information about this training or future trainings, visit http://www.thenetworkwi.com/upcomingevents.

Register for Let’s Be Healthy Together!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!

Register Now for the 31st Annual WIEA Conference Mino-Ayaa ‘Idiiwin: Let’s Be Healthy Together

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Register Now!

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Make sure to set aside this important date on your calendar! The 2016 conference set attendance records and drew people from across the country. The 2017 conference promises to be just as big and just as exciting as last year’s. Some of Indian Country’s biggest names will once again partner with WIEA to bring the latest news, information and opportunities in American Indian and Alaskan Native education directly to you! Click here to view the tentative 2017 Conference Agenda.

Tentatively scheduled events include the The Network’s Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup Training Session on May 11 in Minocqua at The Pointe Hotel; the Lac du Flambeau Wiijii’idiiwin (We Are Doing This Together) – Health and Wellness Expo at Lake of the Torches in Lac du Flambeau; awards banquet and concert by Swedish singing sensation Sofia Jannok at Lake of the Torches in Lac du Flambeau; and WIEA Conference Pow-wow at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua.

The 2017 WIEA Conference will feature Ahinwake Rose, Executive Director, National Indian Education Association; Dr. Ricky White, Superintendent, Circle of Life Academy, White Earth, MN; Mr. Justin Kii Huenemann, President & CEO, Notah Begay III Foundation and member of the Navajo Nation; and Dr. Jim Bouche, Principal/District Administrator, Lakeland Union High School, Minocqua, WI.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to experience all that’s great in American Indian education!

Who should attend? Almost anyone with an interest in Native American education is encouraged to participate, including teachers, students, administrators, parents, grandparents, legislators and tribal leaders.

Is there a cost? Yes, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is a non-profit organization, with the annual conference being the main fundraising source for the organization’s annual operating budget. The cost varies depending on age and participation.

What will I gain by attending? You will gain an invaluable look into what’s happening in Native education. This, along with networking opprotunities, workshops, presentations, and keynote addresses provides an experience you won’t soon forget! And that’s not including the youth paint run/walk, pow-wow at Lakeland Union High School, annual awards banquet and special concert by Swedish singing sensation Sofia Jannok!

Registration Open for WIEA 2017 Conference!

2017 Conference Registration is Now Open!
The Wisconsin Indian Education Association is pleased to announce that registration for the 2017 conference has officially opened along with the launch of our new website!
This year’s conference titled, Mino-Ayaa ‘Idiiwin: “Let’s Be Healthy Together”, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua.
The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.
The 2017 WIEA Conference will feature keynote addresses by Ahinwake Rose, Executive Director, National Indian Education Association; Dr. Ricky White, Superintendent, Circle of Life Academy, White Earth, MN;  Mr. Justin Kii Huenemann, President & CEO, Notah Begay III Foundation; and Dr. Jim Bouche, Principal/District Administrator, Lakeland Union High School, Minocqua, WI.
Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to experience all that’s great in American Indian education!

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association’s July Newsletter Now Available Online!

WIEA

Topics within the July newsletter include:

  • Message from the President
  • University of Wisconsin’s Tribal Technology Institute Outreach Brings Opportunity to Rural Students
  • St. Croix Youth Film Interns Travel to Lac du Flambeau
  • Community Pulls Together to Help Bad River Flood Victims
  • American Indian Science Scholar Program (AISSP)
  • 20th Annual Wisconsin American Indian Studies Program
  • Native American Contractors Association
  • 48th Algonquian Conference (2016)
  • Early Learning Career Pathways Initiative: Credentialing in the Early Care and Education Field
  • 3rd Annual Act 31 Celebration: 27 Years of  Wisconsin Act 31

View full newsletter here:  http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1122500056706&ca=afe66100-498f-40d6-bb51-d46f0c1004cd

Save the Date for The Act 31 Celebration August 18th in Lac Courte Oreilles!

Act 31

Wisconsin Act 31 or American Indian Studies, refers to the requirement that all public school districts in the state provide instruction in the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of Wisconsin’s American Indian nations and tribal communities.  Join the Wisconsin Indian Education Association in celebrating triumphs, challenges and the promise of a better tomorrow, one inclusive of American Indians and of all people!

For more information on Wisconsin Act 31 visit: www.wiea.org or www.indianmascots.com.