Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEMBER 1, 2017

CONTACT:

Brian Jackson

President

Wisconsin Indian Education Association

Office: (715) 588-3800

Email: brian.jackson@ldfschool.org

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November

Organization issues open Call-to-Action to strengthen relations, address disparities faced by American Indians and ending the use of race based mascots.

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is proud to celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November. On August 3, 1990, President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. The Bill reads in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities.” Every year since, the Office of the President has issued a proclamation supporting the month as such. The landmark Bill honors America’s indigenous people.

In keeping with the essence of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association honors the unique culture, history and perseverance of the 11 federally recognized tribal nations within the state, as well as all Native nations across both North and South America.

WIEA President Brian Jackson says the organization is calling on tribal, state and local governments, public and private schools, tribal education programs and departments and civic groups alike to implement curriculum that strengthen educational offerings about Indigenous peoples in Wisconsin.

“For hundreds of years, American Indian history has been obscured, altered and in many instances erased from existence,” said Jackson. “It has long been a mission of WIEA to educate our non-Indian neighbors to the valuable contributions of Native Americans over the course of American history — many of which have allowed this country to attain a level of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by so many,” added Jackson.

As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is issuing a call to action to address three main areas in closing the cultural divide while increasing the socioeconomic, educational and political position of Wisconsin’s tribal nations:

  • An open challenge to local governments, schools, civic organizations and individuals to learn more about the historical and contemporary connections of your local community to neighboring tribes and tribal communities in general.
  • Request that school districts employing race-based mascots develop an exit strategy away from the use of American Indian or other race based imagery within one (1) year. This request is especially critical if a school within the district you reside or a school within your school’s athletic conference currently uses a race based mascot.
  • Contact your legislator(s) to request a repeal of the 2013 Wisconsin Act 115, which makes it nearly impossible for those who object to race-based mascots and sports team names to bring about change at their school district.

Over the nearly 25-year history of WIEA, the group has remained a catalyst in the effort to incorporate historically accurate Native American curriculum into Wisconsin public schools. The effort gained support when former Governor Jim Doyle (D) signed into law Wisconsin Act 31, which requires public schools to offer historically accurate instruction on American Indian tribes in the state. Act 31 was born as a result of the ugly and sometimes violent protests of the late 80s and early 90s organized by non-Indian groups opposed to Chippewa Treaty Rights. Ultimately, District Judge Barbara Crabb ruled in favor of tribal spearers who sought a permanent injunction prohibiting non-Indian protesters from interfering with their court affirmed Treaty Rights, finding the protests to be racially motivated.

In addition to the call-to-action initiatives, WIEA will participate in a National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots, which is scheduled for Friday, November 17, 2017. Tribes, communities, universities and groups across the country plan to hold local and national events. From documentaries and movie showings, to book readings and workshops, and cultural events, the National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots brings to the forefront the social issues caused by Indian and other race based mascots.

“We’re encouraging everyone to participate in American Indian Heritage Month along with the November 17th National Day-of-Action on Raced Based Mascots,” said Jackson. “We all have a responsibility to add to the quality of life in our respective communities. When we act in the spirit of cooperation and unity, we create the framework for a positive future for people of all races and cultures in Wisconsin and beyond.”

Jackson says that WIEA, along with the Indian Mascot and Logo Task Force, offer a host of educational resources that provide historically accurate, authentic information on Wisconsin’s Native nations. “Much of the general public’s views and misconceptions of American Indians is due to the lack of meaningful information,” said Jackson. “WIEA is open to partnering to provide materials, training, resources and information to any group or organization interesting in broadening their knowledge base on American Indians – that also includes widening their network and fostering positive relationships,” Jackson added.

The American Indian Heritage or Native American Heritage Month designation aims to provide a platform for Native people in the United States to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance and ways and concepts of life. This gives Native people and their allies the opportunity to express to their community, city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and cooperation in their local area.

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For additional resources visit any one of the following websites:

www.indianmascots.com

www.wiea.org

www.wisconsinact31.org

www.dpi.wi.gov/amind/state-statues

About the Wisconsin Indian Education Association

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian Educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council (GLITC) Education sub-committee.

The GLITC Education Committee began in the early 1970’s but was disbanded around 1983 because of a lack of funds.

A group of concerned Indian Educators began meeting in 1984 and after a series of meetings during that year, developed By-laws and a mission statement.

The group was formally organized in 1985 as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

The Association has seven regions throughout the State. Each region elects/appoints two representatives as WIEA Board members for a two-year term.

Each Region’s Board members are responsible for hosting a meeting in their region throughout the year to share and gather information for the Board to either act upon or disseminate to all other WIEA members.

The Board meets every month except December. Meetings are held in the various regions throughout the state in an effort to get input from the general membership regarding their issues and concerns.

Congrats Wisconsin Indian Education Association 2017 Award Recipients

Wisconsin Indian Education Association Announces 2017 Award Recipients

Awardees to be honored Saturday, May 13 in Lac du Flambeau, WI.
LAC DU FLAMBEAU, WI – The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is pleased to announce the annual award recipients for 2017-2018. The awards highlight individuals who have made a lasting impact on the educational opportunities of American Indians and Alaskan Natives living in Wisconsin.
This year the awards span five categories with honors going to 14 individuals. Those categories include: Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year; Outstanding Indian Elder of the Year; Indian Educator of the Year; Ronald N. Satz – Friend of Indian Education; and Indian Parent(s) of the Year.
This year’s awardees are:
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year Pre-K 3rd Grade: Grason Ozaawaanakwaad Jackson, Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Indians
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year 4th – 7th Grade: Corbin Welch, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year 8th – 10th Grade: Eve Hawpetoss, Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin/Forest County Potawatomi
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year 11th – 12th Grade: Saychia Wayka, Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year 11th – 12th Grade: Autry Johnson, Forest County Potawatomi
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year 11th – 12th Grade:
    Jon Poupart, Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
  • Outstanding American Indian Student of the Year 11th – 12th Grade: Emily Skenandore, Oneida Nation of Wisconsin
  • Under Graduate Student of the Year: Alexis Harris, Forest County Potawatomi
  • Graduate Student of the Year: Timothy Fish, Muskogee Nation of Oklahoma
  • Outstanding Indian Educator of the Year: Thomas Boelter, Forest County Potawatomi
  • Outstanding Indian Parents of the Year: James and Jennifer Crawford, Forest County Potawatomi
  • Friend of Indian Education of the Year: Samantha Smith
  • Outstanding Indian Elder of the Year: Mildred “Tinker” Schuman, Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians
  • Outstanding Indian Elder of the Year: Gary Kmiecik, Hunkpapa, Cheyenne River Sioux
“The individuals selected are each in their own way, champions of Indian education,” said Wisconsin Indian Education Association president Brian Jackson. “It is through their diligence and commitment to education that we celebrate Indian achievement at all levels of the educational process,” added Jackson.
Award winners will be honored at an awards banquet on Saturday, May 13, 2017, at Lake of the Torches Resort Casino Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau. The
awards banquet will be held in association with the 31st annual Wisconsin Indian Education Association conference titled, “Mino-Ayaa ‘Idiiwin: Let’s Be Healthy Together“, May 12-13, 2017. The conference is set to take place at The Waters of Minocqua with related events at Lakeland Union High School, Lac du Flambeau Public School and Lake of the Torches Resort Casino Convention Center.
The conference is the only statewide conference that specifically addresses issues in Native American education at all educational levels from early childhood programs to graduate and professional schools.
“On behalf of the conference selection committee, we congratulate this year’s field of winners,” said 2017 conference committee chair Susan Crazy Thunder, who also serves on the WIEA board of directors. “This is a competitive nomination process and we truly appreciate everyone who took the time to participate in this year’s awards process. Thank you for your commitment to building a better tomorrow for Indian education in Wisconsin and beyond.”

WIEA is in May!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!

Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup – Coming to Minocqua on May 11, 2017!

Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup

Systems Changing to Do What is Best for Our Children

May 11, 2017

The Pointe Hotel & Suites | Minocqua

Purpose

This early childhood tribal networking event will provide opportunities for facilitators, presenters, and participants to share information, resources, best practices, and model programs.

As part of this workgroup, participants will:

  • participate in future planning to promote awareness of early childhood care and education for children and families in our communities
  • develop cross sector early childhood collaborations within each tribal community
  • promote broader collaborative work among all of the tribal communities and between the tribal communities and the state departments

Participant Outcomes

As an expansion of the Early Childhood Tribal Workgroup meetings, participants and others will:

  • hear motivational stories about early childhood collaborations within/between communities
  • be provided with resources from state agencies

Schedule, Fees, and Registration There are no fees associated with attending this training, but pre-registration is REQUIRED. Please visit http://www.MyQuickReg.com to register.

Tentative Schedule

• 8:00 am – 8:30 am Registration and Continental Breakfast (provided)

• 8:30 am – 12:00 pm Morning Workshop: Motivational Partnership Stories and Resource Sharing

• 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Lunch (provided)

• 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm Afternoon Workshop: Topical Presentations and Future Planning

MARK YOUR CALENDARS!! The next Early Childhood Tribal Workshop is tentatively scheduled for August 2017. For more information about this training or future trainings, visit http://www.thenetworkwi.com/upcomingevents.

Register for Let’s Be Healthy Together!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!

Registration Open for WIEA 2017 Conference!

2017 Conference Registration is Now Open!
The Wisconsin Indian Education Association is pleased to announce that registration for the 2017 conference has officially opened along with the launch of our new website!
This year’s conference titled, Mino-Ayaa ‘Idiiwin: “Let’s Be Healthy Together”, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua.
The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.
The 2017 WIEA Conference will feature keynote addresses by Ahinwake Rose, Executive Director, National Indian Education Association; Dr. Ricky White, Superintendent, Circle of Life Academy, White Earth, MN;  Mr. Justin Kii Huenemann, President & CEO, Notah Begay III Foundation; and Dr. Jim Bouche, Principal/District Administrator, Lakeland Union High School, Minocqua, WI.
Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to experience all that’s great in American Indian education!

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association’s July Newsletter Now Available Online!

WIEA

Topics within the July newsletter include:

  • Message from the President
  • University of Wisconsin’s Tribal Technology Institute Outreach Brings Opportunity to Rural Students
  • St. Croix Youth Film Interns Travel to Lac du Flambeau
  • Community Pulls Together to Help Bad River Flood Victims
  • American Indian Science Scholar Program (AISSP)
  • 20th Annual Wisconsin American Indian Studies Program
  • Native American Contractors Association
  • 48th Algonquian Conference (2016)
  • Early Learning Career Pathways Initiative: Credentialing in the Early Care and Education Field
  • 3rd Annual Act 31 Celebration: 27 Years of  Wisconsin Act 31

View full newsletter here:  http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1122500056706&ca=afe66100-498f-40d6-bb51-d46f0c1004cd

Take a Look at the April-May News From Wisconsin Indian Education Association

wiea

Highlights from this issue include:

  • WIEA Annual Conference 
  • State Presidential Scholars Show Diverse Achievements, Skills
  • WIEA’s Munson Earns Graduate Recognition of Excellence Award
  • Wisconsin Seal of Biliteracy Now Implemented
  • Robotics Grants Established
  • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction
  • Inclusion Institute Presents 23rd Annual State-Wide Institute on Best Practices in Inclusive Education – 2016
  • Farm to School National Conference
  • 20th Annual American Indian Studies Summer Institute
  • We Are Healers Sets Out to Inspire, Educate
  • Generation Indigenous Youth Gatherings 2016
  • STEM Academy Offers Programs for Wisconsin Middle Schools

View full newsletter here: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1122500056706&ca=ab9ecbbc-680e-451e-8f74-b055898bbc06

Check Out Nicky Bowman’s Panel at WIEA on Indigenous Resiliency Stories tomorrow!

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Tomorrow at WIEA, Nicole Bowman along with panelists Geraldine Sanapaw, Monique Tyndall, Adrienne Thunder, and Nicole Fish will present “We Are NOT an Asterisk! Indigenous Resiliency Stories: Evidence-Based Strategies/Supports for Success in Higher Ed”.

Panelists will share their stories of resiliency and success in navigating, persisting, and graduating from academia. Blending family, cultural, and western strategies these panelists will provide what worked best for them and lessons learned. Audience discussion will help participants consider how these strategies and supports can be applied to their context(s). Panelists represent graduating from online graduate programs, public universities, private universities, and partial residency programs.

The panel starts at 11:15am in the Koshkonong room at the WIEA conference. See you there!

Don’t Miss Nicole Bowman & Monique Tyndall’s Presentation at WIEA on Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation Practices!

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BPC’s very own Nicole Bowman and Monique Tyndall are presenting a session titled “Self-Determined Evaluation Pedagogy: Strategies & Modeling Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation Practices” tomorrow at 10:00am CST at the Wisconsin Indian Education Association conference in Madison, WI. You don’t want to miss this session!