Faculty Position in Indigenous Community Studies

Open Rank faculty position in Indigenous Community Studies University of
Wisconsin-Madison The Department of Civil Society and Community Studies
(School of Human Ecology) and the American Indian Studies Program (College
of Letters and Science) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison invite
applications for a tenure-track faculty position, open to all ranks in
Indigenous Community Studies.

Position Summary:
This position is for a joint appointment with 50% in the Department of Civil
Society and Community Studies (tenure home) and 50% in the American Indian
Studies Program. We seek a candidate with expertise in community-engaged
scholarship, indigenous methodologies/evaluation, community leadership,
civil society or nonprofits and with tribal expertise. The area of research
is open and may include community/tribal health, environmental health,
community/tribal nutrition, indigenous knowledge systems, traditional
ecological knowledge, community/tribal education, social justice,
incarceration, etc. The candidate’s research should focus on Indigenous
peoples and issues within North America with a particular focus on Wisconsin
communities. The position requires scholarship, teaching, and service in a
department and a program serving undergraduate and graduate students. Other
desirable attributes include strong research methods, oral and written
communication skills and the ability to interact with an interdisciplinary
and collaborative intellectual community. Native American and minority
candidates are encouraged to apply.
Degree and area of specialization:
Holds a doctoral degree in a discipline relevant to the units and position
e.g. psychology, human development and family studies, social work, American
Indian studies, anthropology, education or related disciplines. Employment
contingent upon completion of degree.

The successful candidate will:
– Build community-academic partnerships with tribal/urban Indian communities
especially in Wisconsin.
– Maintain a coherent and productive program of research excellence.
– Seek and secure funding to support research partnerships.
– Teach graduate and undergraduate courses (2:2 load) and contribute to
program development.
– Supervise student research and provide high quality academic mentoring.
– Participate in shared governance and other departmental and university
service activities as appropriate for career stage.

Application link:
http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/496371/asst-assoc-or-full-professor-of-
indigenous-community-studies

What is “Democratizing Evaluation?” Dr. Bowman answers

130722 - uwmadDr. Bowman will participate in the “Democratizing Evaluation” panel at the CommNS Fall Event, this Thursday, Oct. 20th, 1:30-2:30 pm. The event will be in room 1199 (the Wisconsin Idea room) in Nancy Nicholas Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Dr. Bowman will answer these questions:

  • What does “democratizing evaluation” mean to you? 
  • What needs to happen for your vision of “democratizing evaluation” to be realized?

After this initial sharing, we will open up the discussion with additional questions posed to attendees and the panel for interactive, generative conversation.

*Download the PDF of the event flyer

Sign Up Today for the UW Institute for Urban Education Conference August 11th!

iue-logo

This conference highlights partnerships between school, university, and culturally diverse communities as a means to support classroom practices, improve student outcomes and engage families. In addition, they always highlight culturally responsive pedagogy as a necessary practice for cooperating teachers and other educators working with children who are culturally, linguistically and economically diverse.

To learn more click here: https://uwm.edu/education/community/partnerships/institute-urban-edu/professional-dev-opportunities/

What will LEAD do Next?

Enjoy viewing past projects by LEAD. Stay tuned to see what LEAD does next!

Projects

Advanced Fellowships in Women’s Health HUB Site-VA
Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
Biology Scholars Program
Fair Play
Language, Understanding, Cognition, Intelligence and Data Science (LUCID)
Mentor Training
Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation
Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI)


Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative, 2011-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluators: Sara Kraemer

Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative (AEI) is a University of Wisconsin-Madison program whose aim is to close the opportunity gap in undergraduate courses through changes in course instructor practice and pedagogy. Course instructors attend an eight week immersion to learn about key opportunity gap and diversity issues at U.S. college campuses broadly and UW-Madison campuses specifically, followed by developing and implementing research-based course interventions. In our formative evaluation study, Sara Kraemer has been a member of the AEI team, administering instructor-based surveys and working one-on-one with faculty to evaluate their student data and develop target areas of support. AEI has partnered with the UW-Madison’s HOPE Lab to provide summative impact analysis on student achievement and faculty knowledge and attitudes about opportunity gaps and diversity at UW-Madison.


Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL), 2014-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluator: Sara Kraemer

The Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL) facilitates innovative teaching and student-centered active learning by providing instructional support and resources in unique technology-enhanced learning spaces on the UW-Madison campus.

Sara Kraemer conducted a mixed-methods evaluation study of a Math 112, an introductory mathematics course that fulfills mathematics requirements for undergraduate students. The study evaluated the impact of the WisCEL on student engagement, student achievement, and perceptions about the efficacy of the WisCEL learning experience in Math 112. Formative evaluation included a student survey, a focus group with TAs, and observations of Math 112 classes to asses student engagement. Summative evaluation included a statistical analysis of student achievement scores (i.e., end of course grades, drop rates) of Math 112 courses before they were taught in WisCEL compared to Math 112 coursers after they were taught in WisCEL. Summative results revealed that the WisCEL classroom had a positive impact on student achievement scores (as a whole and across demographic groups) – students were more likely to receive higher grades and have lower rates of drop out in the WisCEL classroom than in the non-WisCEL classroom. The findings were triangulated with the survey and focus groups results to assess how the classroom instruction interacts with the features of the WisCEL space.

WisCEL program managers are using the evaluation findings for program improvement, a proof-of-concept to campus stakeholders, validation of the program’s efficacy, and assessment of transferability of evaluation methods to other WisCEL courses.


Crossroads Project: Intersecting Workshops, Learning Communities, and Research in Biology to Promote Student Success in STEM, NSF-IUSE Program (PI: Loretta Brancaccio-Taras), 2015-2018

Evaluator: Sara Kraemer
Project Site: Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York

The Crossroads Project at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is designed to strengthen the skills, retention, and graduation rates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. The project targets biology majors, and is specifically designed to support introductory biology students in success in the course, as well as progression through the biology or other STEM majors through three major efforts. The three major efforts are: (1) Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, (2) Community of Biology Learners sessions, and (3) Campus as Research Lab. The workshops and sessions are aimed to enhance student learning through development of study skills in STEM and biology and create cohesion and community through structured group-engagement outside of the classroom. The Campus as Research Lab provides an opportunity for students to work like scientists with KCC faculty, by engaging in the scientific inquiry process and conducting basic experiments.

The evaluation study of the Crossroads Project is a mixed-methods design that includes both formative and summative analysis. For the Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, the summative analysis is comprised of statistical analysis of end of course grades for biology students and the formative analysis is an end of course survey to assess student perceptions of the impact of their experience on their academic success. For the Community of Biology Learners, a formative evaluation content analysis of student answers to assignments as well as a written instructor’s log of teaching practices. For the Campus as Research Lab, the evaluation component is a qualitative content analysis of student writing course assignments and an end of course student survey.

collaboration

collaboration


Download the LEAD Flyer! Get to Know The LEAD Center: Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination

LEAD flyerDownload PDF!

Download the LEAD Flyer! Get to Know The LEAD Center: Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination

Meet the LEAD Staff!

Staff

Christine Maidl Pribbenow, Ph.D.

Christine Maidl Pribbenow, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at UW-Madison. As a professional evaluator, she uses mixed methodology to assess student and faculty learning, and to evaluate educational programming for various postsecondary institutions and organizations. She has been the Evaluation Director on a variety of programs to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in STEMM, including women and different racial/ethnic populations. As the Director of LEAD, she works with potential partners to develop evaluation plans and after funding, oversees professional evaluators who who conduct the evaluation.


Sara Kraemer

Sara Kraemer, Ph.D., is a Researcher and works on a variety of evaluation projects and programs in higher education, including the Achievement Gap Project, the Delta Program, and most recently the Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL). She also works in K-12 content areas including teacher and principal evaluation systems, measurement of teacher quality, and data-based decision making. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from UW-Madison.

 


Nicole Bowman-Farrell

Nicole Bowman-Farrell (Mohican/Munsee), Ph.D. is a Researcher & Evaluator in the LEAD Center. Culturally and contextually responsive educational research, evaluation, and policy studies are central to the work Nicole has carried out over nearly two decades.  By working “with” people and not “on” them Nicole is known as a responsive and effective multi-jurisdictional and government systems subject matter expert.  She has been a leader on educational and government initiatives where Tribal and non-Tribal agencies partner to improve outcomes, capacities, and competencies for more effective, responsive, and impactful programming.  As an evaluator, trainer, and technical assistance provider Dr. Bowman has increased the skills, competencies, and capacities for many university, non-profit, and for profit academic organizations working with Indigenous and other marginalized populations.  In May 2015 Nicole graduated with her PhD from the Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis Department at the University of WI-Madison.  Her multi-jurisdictional educational policy study was the first in the country to examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools.   Dr. Bowman currently is an active elected leader, international annual conference trainer, and/or an appointed advisory member for several work groups under the American Evaluation Association, the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment, and the Eastern Evaluation Research Society


Kate McCleary

Kate McCleary, Ph.D., is an Associate Researcher with the LEAD Center.  Evaluation and assessment has been central to the work Kate has carried out in international education over the past decade.  She uses evaluative practices in examining undergraduate intercultural learning and cultural adjustment, and establishing and reviewing international, university-partnerships within higher education settings.  She was a member of a longitudinal, team-based, evaluation of a girls and marginalized children/youth empowerment program carried out in eight countries through the Minnesota International Development Education Consortium. Kate appreciates the utilization of mixed-methodology in evaluation studies, and has taught qualitative research methods at the undergraduate level.  She values the insight and understanding that her work provides to institutions and organizations with which she partners. Kate holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Educational Policy & Administration with a focus in Comparative International Development Education.

 


Christine Fabian

Christine Fabian, M.S., is an Assistant Researcher focusing on evaluation research for grants and programs related to higher education. Her evaluation experience involves community education programs, NSF funded scholarships, undergraduate research experiences, first-year student engagement activities, and women in STEM. Since beginning work at the LEAD Center, Christine has continued to develop her skills in mixed-methods research, data collection and analysis, survey design, and qualitative data analysis software. She has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Sociology and Rural Studies from South Dakota State University.

 


Mary Mezera, B.S., who has been with WCER for three years and is the Administrative Coordinator for the center. She also assists WCER PIs Sadhana Puntambekar, Marty Nystrand and Sandy Rutherford. She has an associate’s degree from UW˗Rock County in applied arts and science and a bachelor’s degree from Edgewood College in criminal justice.

Why Bowler Schools are Unique

Dr. Nicole Bowman answers why Bowler Schools are unique. One reason is the low turnover rates of the principal and superintendent. Average turnover is 3.2-3.5 years. At Bowler schools these positions have been filled for 7+ years by the same individuals.

Be sure to watch the entire playlist from Dr. Nicole Bowman’s PhD oral dissertation for more information.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldcCVGMPEYE

LEAD Projects

LEAD-center-logoProjects

Advanced Fellowships in Women’s Health HUB Site-VA
Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
Biology Scholars Program
Fair Play
Mentor Training
Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation
Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI)


Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative, 2011-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluators: Sara Kraemer

Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative (AEI) is a University of Wisconsin-Madison program whose aim is to close the opportunity gap in undergraduate courses through changes in course instructor practice and pedagogy. Course instructors attend an eight week immersion to learn about key opportunity gap and diversity issues at U.S. college campuses broadly and UW-Madison campuses specifically, followed by developing and implementing research-based course interventions. In our formative evaluation study, Sara Kraemer has been a member of the AEI team, administering instructor-based surveys and working one-on-one with faculty to evaluate their student data and develop target areas of support. AEI has partnered with the UW-Madison’s HOPE Lab to provide summative impact analysis on student achievement and faculty knowledge and attitudes about opportunity gaps and diversity at UW-Madison.


Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL), 2014-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluator: Sara Kraemer

The Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL) facilitates innovative teaching and student-centered active learning by providing instructional support and resources in unique technology-enhanced learning spaces on the UW-Madison campus.

Sara Kraemer conducted a mixed-methods evaluation study of a Math 112, an introductory mathematics course that fulfills mathematics requirements for undergraduate students. The study evaluated the impact of the WisCEL on student engagement, student achievement, and perceptions about the efficacy of the WisCEL learning experience in Math 112. Formative evaluation included a student survey, a focus group with TAs, and observations of Math 112 classes to asses student engagement. Summative evaluation included a statistical analysis of student achievement scores (i.e., end of course grades, drop rates) of Math 112 courses before they were taught in WisCEL compared to Math 112 coursers after they were taught in WisCEL. Summative results revealed that the WisCEL classroom had a positive impact on student achievement scores (as a whole and across demographic groups) – students were more likely to receive higher grades and have lower rates of drop out in the WisCEL classroom than in the non-WisCEL classroom. The findings were triangulated with the survey and focus groups results to assess how the classroom instruction interacts with the features of the WisCEL space.

WisCEL program managers are using the evaluation findings for program improvement, a proof-of-concept to campus stakeholders, validation of the program’s efficacy, and assessment of transferability of evaluation methods to other WisCEL courses.


Crossroads Project: Intersecting Workshops, Learning Communities, and Research in Biology to Promote Student Success in STEM, NSF-IUSE Program (PI: Loretta Brancaccio-Taras), 2015-2018

Evaluator: Sara Kraemer
Project Site: Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York

The Crossroads Project at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is designed to strengthen the skills, retention, and graduation rates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. The project targets biology majors, and is specifically designed to support introductory biology students in success in the course, as well as progression through the biology or other STEM majors through three major efforts. The three major efforts are: (1) Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, (2) Community of Biology Learners sessions, and (3) Campus as Research Lab. The workshops and sessions are aimed to enhance student learning through development of study skills in STEM and biology and create cohesion and community through structured group-engagement outside of the classroom. The Campus as Research Lab provides an opportunity for students to work like scientists with KCC faculty, by engaging in the scientific inquiry process and conducting basic experiments.

The evaluation study of the Crossroads Project is a mixed-methods design that includes both formative and summative analysis. For the Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, the summative analysis is comprised of statistical analysis of end of course grades for biology students and the formative analysis is an end of course survey to assess student perceptions of the impact of their experience on their academic success. For the Community of Biology Learners, a formative evaluation content analysis of student answers to assignments as well as a written instructor’s log of teaching practices. For the Campus as Research Lab, the evaluation component is a qualitative content analysis of student writing course assignments and an end of course student survey.

* Information from http://lead.wceruw.org/projects.html

Get to Know LEAD

LEAD-center-logoThe LEAD Center is comprised of professional staff who conduct program evaluation within and about higher education both locally and nationally.

LEAD, by design…
We work collaboratively with faculty and staff who are Principal Investigators (PIs) and are in need of consultation or services to propose or conduct evaluation of a grant. We build logic models and design evaluation plans that are aligned with a project’s specific aims and objectives to improve learning in postsecondary institutions.

LEAD, in the right direction…
When funded, we provide you with formative evaluation to ensure that you are meeting your goals and to help you improve the implementation of your project.

LEAD, with evidence…
We collect and analyze data to assess the efficacy of your program and to provide you and your funding agency with the results from your evaluation and a summative report.

LEAD, with integrity…
We provide an objective view of your project’s implementation, and ensure the ethical treatment of human subjects, confidentiality of your data, and the highest standards of practice in evaluation.

LEAD, so others will follow…
We help you to disseminate evaluation findings and if applicable, publish them broadly so that others can learn from you.

LEAD, the way…
We evaluate locally funded projects, as well as those funded by the federal government and private foundations or trusts.

Learn more at http://lead.wceruw.org/index.html

Dr. Bowman Appointed to University of Wisconsin Madison Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination (LEAD) Center

IMG_1229Dr. Nicole Bowman has been appointed to University of Wisconsin Madison Learning through Evaluation,  Adaptation, and Dissemination (LEAD) Center.

LEAD website

View LEAD Staff

LEAD Mission

To advance the quality of teaching and learning by evaluating the effectiveness and impact of educational innovations, policies, and practices within higher education. Rigorous, theory-driven methods and interdisciplinary collaborations anchor our approach to evaluation, leading to the translation of findings and evidence-based strategies in service to student learning.

The LEAD Center is housed within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at the School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison.