1st Annual Seminole Tribe of Florida Renewable Energy & Sustainability Conference

1st Annual Seminole Tribe of Florida Renewable Energy &

Sustainability Conference

Join Us February 7 – 9, 2018

·    Hear about innovative new projects

·    Network with tribal professionals


Tribal Officials, Tribal Housing Departments, Utility Staff, Tribal Code Officials, and Construction Staff

Limited to 80 seats.

Registration will open January 1st, 2018

Hosted at:

Native Learning Center

6363 Taft Street

Hollywood, FL 33024


Click to download the flyer

New Resources Available for Grantseekers

New Resources Available for Fundraisers & Grantseekers

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) is delighted to share new resources for grantseekers in order to help your organization in its sustainability efforts. You will find these resources on our website under the Grantseeker Resources section. This webpage includes webinars and other materials providing general tips regarding applying for and researching various funding opportunities, along with information on evaluation and First Nations’ own grantmaking process. It includes resources helpful to both nonprofits and tribal government programs.

In particular, today we are pleased to offer two new pre-recorded (on-demand) webinars that will be helpful to you and your communities as you create new initiatives and develop current programs to fulfill your missions. Please feel free to share this information with others. These webinars were developed based on feedback from grantees and applicants. Note: You’ll just need to add your email address and name to view either of these free webinars.

These webinars were made possible with the generous support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Catalyzing Community Giving Initiative, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Native Arts Initiative: A Project of First Nations Development Institute.

You can also find these and other various webinars on the First Nations Knowledge webinar page at www.firstnations.org/fnk, and then click on any of the links to “Previous Webinars.”


Faculty Position in Indigenous Community Studies

Open Rank faculty position in Indigenous Community Studies University of
Wisconsin-Madison The Department of Civil Society and Community Studies
(School of Human Ecology) and the American Indian Studies Program (College
of Letters and Science) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison invite
applications for a tenure-track faculty position, open to all ranks in
Indigenous Community Studies.

Position Summary:
This position is for a joint appointment with 50% in the Department of Civil
Society and Community Studies (tenure home) and 50% in the American Indian
Studies Program. We seek a candidate with expertise in community-engaged
scholarship, indigenous methodologies/evaluation, community leadership,
civil society or nonprofits and with tribal expertise. The area of research
is open and may include community/tribal health, environmental health,
community/tribal nutrition, indigenous knowledge systems, traditional
ecological knowledge, community/tribal education, social justice,
incarceration, etc. The candidate’s research should focus on Indigenous
peoples and issues within North America with a particular focus on Wisconsin
communities. The position requires scholarship, teaching, and service in a
department and a program serving undergraduate and graduate students. Other
desirable attributes include strong research methods, oral and written
communication skills and the ability to interact with an interdisciplinary
and collaborative intellectual community. Native American and minority
candidates are encouraged to apply.
Degree and area of specialization:
Holds a doctoral degree in a discipline relevant to the units and position
e.g. psychology, human development and family studies, social work, American
Indian studies, anthropology, education or related disciplines. Employment
contingent upon completion of degree.

The successful candidate will:
– Build community-academic partnerships with tribal/urban Indian communities
especially in Wisconsin.
– Maintain a coherent and productive program of research excellence.
– Seek and secure funding to support research partnerships.
– Teach graduate and undergraduate courses (2:2 load) and contribute to
program development.
– Supervise student research and provide high quality academic mentoring.
– Participate in shared governance and other departmental and university
service activities as appropriate for career stage.

Application link:

OCIE Conference Workshop Proposal

OCIE has begun taking proposals for workshops and poster presentations for the 38th Annual Oklahoma Council for Indian Education Conference, which will be held December 4 & 5 in Durant. Please share this with anyone you think may be interested. For the first time, OCIE is offering a poster presentation session and would love to have a great turnout. This is a wonderful opportunity for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as well educators to present their ideas and projects!

The Call to Conference information is in the works and should be available in the next couple of weeks. We will have it on our website when it becomes available: http://oklahoma-ocie.org/index.html

American Indian and Alaska Native Behavioral Health Webinar Series

Join us for a special webinar hosted by the American Indian and Alaska Native NPA Caucus

Project Venture, an evidence-based intervention, combines traditional native wisdom with positive youth development, social emotional learning, outdoor adventure, and service learning to create a unique approach that has been successful for more than 25 years. Beginning with a camp in Oklahoma during 1982, Project Venture has evolved into a model program recognized by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) that has been implemented in 25 states, 8 Canadian provinces, and Hungary. The National Indian Youth Leadership Project founded Project Venture and provides training, coaching, mentoring, curriculum development, and grant-writing assistance to program participants. The webinar will highlight the project’s core elements and guiding principles of this unique, internationally recognized native youth program and assist participants with exploring their readiness to implement it.

TOPIC: Project Venture – Positive Youth Development for American Indian and             Alaska Native Youth

DATE: September 20, 2017

TIME: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time



Dr. Francine Gachupin, Member, American Indian and Alaska Native NPA Caucus


McClellan Hall, Founder and Executive Director of the National Indian Youth Leadership Project

Register Here*: http://tinyurl.com/ProjectVentureRegistration

View the abstract and bio here: http://bit.ly/2x8JEen

The American Indian and Alaska Native National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities (NPA) Caucus provides a forum for members to increase dialogue across the country and to coordinate and enhance tribal, state and local efforts to address health disparities and the social determinants of health for AI/ANs.

Visit the AI/AN NPA Caucus website for more information: http://aian.npa-rhec.org/.

*If the registration link does not work, please copy the entire link and paste it into your web browser. For webinar-specific questions, contact the moderator: csantos@explorepsa.com.

Honoring Nations Award nominations now open!

Know of any innovative tribal governance programs?


Join Honoring Nations as we kick off our 2018 Honoring Nations Awards cycle.  Dedicated to recognizing excellence in self-governance, these awards showcase the very best of Indian Country.

Honoring Nations is looking for nominations in the following categories:

  • Cultural Affairs
  • Economic and Community Development
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Intergovernmental Relations
  • Education
  • Government Performance
  • Health and Social Services
  • Justice

Nominate yourself– or a program you know of– by filling out the following form: bit.ly/HN2018Nominate. For more information, email hpaied@hks.harvard.edu.


NIHB Funding Opportunity for Public Health Accreditation

Applications Due September 1, 2017
The National Indian Health Board (NIHB) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are pleased to announce a new funding cycle for the Tribal Accreditation Support Initiative (Tribal ASI).
WHAT IS TRIBAL ASI? Tribal ASI is a funding and technical assistance program offered by NIHB to eligible Tribal entities to accomplish objectives toward meeting the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) Standards and Measures in order to achieve public health accreditation.

Tribes have identified the following benefits to public health accreditation efforts:
  • Credibility
  • Improved Quality of Services
  • Improved Health of the Community
  • Staff Pride
  • Improved State and Local Relations
  • Population Health Protection Assurances
  • Sovereignty
WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR TRIBAL ASI? Official health entities of federally recognized Tribal governments, Tribal organization, or inter-Tribal consortiums, as defined in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, as amended.
HOW MUCH FUNDING IS AVAILABLE? Up to $10,500 is available to each awardee.
BEGINNER COHORT NEW THIS YEAR! There will be a separate funding category for Tribal entities new to public health accreditation who wish to explore, in-depth, the potential of achieving public health accreditation with the option of taking the first steps on a path toward achieving such accreditation.  The Beginner Cohort will receive training, form a team, conduct a self-assessment and devise a plan for moving forward.
WHAT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (TA) FOR PUBLIC HEALTH ACCREDITATION IS PROVIDED?NIHB conducts monthly one-on-one TA for awardees, national webinars, training opportunities at NIHB national conferences, a monthly Tribal Accreditation Learning Community (TALC), and networking with other Tribal, national and regional resources.
HOW CAN FUNDS BE SPENT? Acceptable uses: Staff wages, Supplies, Equipment, Training, Travel, Printing, Media, Meeting Expenses, Incentives, Consultants
WHAT TYPE OF PROJECTS WILL THE ASI AWARD FUND? Some of the projects that have been funded in the past by ASI funds include developing and implementing:
Community Health Assessments ● Community Health Improvement Plans ● Workforce Development Plans ● Performance Management Systems ● Quality Improvement Plans ● Departmental Strategic Plans ● Documentation Review/Mock Site Visits ● Self-Assessments ●  Stakeholder and Community Engagement Activities
Work toward any of the PHAB domains will be considered as well as other activities related to public health accreditation readiness. See the PHAB Standards and Measures v1.5 for domain descriptions.www.phaboard.org
The request for applications (RFA) can be downloaded, completed as a Word document, then turned into a PDF for submission. Completed applications are due to NIHB via email by Friday, September 1, 2017, by11:59pm Eastern Time.   

Are You Currently Receiving or Interested in an AmericCorps or Tribal AmeriCorps grant?

If so, Serve Wisconsin is offering a 2-day workshop for you all to receive expert assistance and ample work time on your next AmeriCorps or Tribal AmeriCorps grant! This very special opportunity will be held in Madison, WI and conducted in partnership with WEC: Wisconsin Center for Education Research.

Dr. Good, the WEC team, and Serve Wisconsin will spend two days helping you to develop the best

  • Theory of Change
  • Logic Model
  • Program Design
  • Performance Measures
  • Data Systems
  • Evidence
  • Evaluation

This workshop will not only provide information on each of these key grant components, but also offer plenty of work time to receive 1:1 and small group support!

To make this event the best it can be, please submit your burning AmeriCorps grant questions in advance on this form!

RSVP today, but no later than August 1, 2017!




Webinar: Youth Empowerment Part 1 – Indigenous Food and Healing

Youth Empowerment Part 1: Indigenous Food and Healing

Webinar Date:

Wednesday, June 21, 2017


11 a.m. Alaska
12 p.m. Pacific
12 p.m. Arizona
1 p.m. Mountain
2 p.m. Central
3 p.m. Eastern

About the Webinar

Join the SAMHSA Tribal Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Center, the Center for Native American Youth, and members of their 2017 Champions for Change class for a three-part webinar series on youth empowerment in Indian Country.

In Part 1 we will welcome Mariah Gladstone, who will discuss her work as founder of Indigikitchen, an online cooking show dedicated to the diets of indigenous communities. She will also discuss the growing understanding of food sovereignty and its connection to wellness in tribal communities.

10 resources to accurately provide Indigenous people’s history from Tribal College Journal

Indigenous Peoples’ History: An Annotated Bibliography

Teaching American Indian history, or history in general, has transformed dramatically over the past 20 years. Much of this is due to technological advancements such as PowerPoint, online resources, and web platforms such as Blackboard. But in large part it is also due to our changing perspectives on the past. The one truism to remember when teaching history is that all history is revisionism.

Our present-day realities shape the way we think about the past and interpret historical trends and figures. All too often, wide-eyed freshmen (and many others) cling to the notion that somehow history is a social science. Many institutions place the field in the social sciences department, right alongside psychology, sociology, and anthropology. It’s true that history is based on a set of facts and events that are unchangeable. For example, Christopher Columbus’ three ships—the Niña, Pinta, and Santa Maria—landed on an island in what is today the Bahamas in the year 1,492 of the Gregorian calendar. But our interpretation of those facts changes dramatically from generation to generation. Years ago, many people learned that Columbus “discovered” America and that the world changed for the better because of it, a belief held so strongly that the United States has a federal holiday commemorating the man. Today, I would venture to guess that very few college-level instructors teach this interpretation of Columbus and his voyage. While all may not portray him as a man driven by greed who committed countless atrocities, most at least complicate the narrative and point out that there is more than one story about Columbus.

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