NIH STEP-UP 11th & 12th Grade High School Portal Open

 

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK)

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

2017 American Indian/Alaska Native High School
NIH/NIDDK STEP-UP Cohort
The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held in Washington, D.C.
  • Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or permanent legal resident of U.S.- affiliated territory
  • High school junior or senior (at the time of application)
  • Must meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Part of an underrepresented racial or ethnic group (American Indian/Alaska Native).
    • Disadvantage as defined by annual family income
    • First generation in family to attend college
    • Diagnosed with a disability limiting one or more major life activities

Principal Investigator: Dr. Carolee Dodge-Francis
Emailcarolee.dodge-francis@unlv.edu
American Indian Research & Education Center (AIREC)

Apply at: http://stepup.niddk.nih.gov/Register.aspx
(If you are a new participant register as a new user and don’t forget to store your email/username and passcode, you will need later if you are a returning, second year use last years’ information)
Apply October 15, 2017 through February 15, 2018
Apply Now

 

Native Students Travel Scholarships

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is accepting applications from American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) students in the science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) fields to attend the Annual Conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) being held in Philadelphia, PA from October 21-24, 2017. NIJ is seeking to sponsor five (5) undergraduate or graduate students. These students will have the opportunity to interact with criminal justice scientists and practitioners and attend panel discussions on the most urgent issues facing communities and innovative, evidence-based solutions.

As NIJ is committed to uniting STEM research and criminal justice, and advancing diverse perspectives about persistent crime problems across a broad range of demographics and disciplines, we look forward to implementing this new program. Applications are due June 30, 2017. Please share this information with anyone who might be interested in applying.

For more information on this opportunity go to:

For more information on NIJ’s research portfolios go to:

 

First Cohort of Native Students to Graduate From UW Madison College Pipeline Program

Tacked to the wall of his bedroom on the Oneida Indian Reservation is evidence of how hard Michael Williams worked as a high school student — an acceptance letter to Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

But the real prize, the acceptance letter to UW–Madison, his dream school, travels with him in his backpack, always within reach.

Growing up, Williams, 18, says he watched too many young people flounder in their attempts to leave the reservation and find opportunities elsewhere. He was determined not to be one of them.

“I’ve always wanted to further my education,” he says. “The more I know, the better I feel personally. And I think college is the step to a successful job and a secure future.”

Williams participated in an extensive college pipeline program sponsored by UW–Madison for students from tribal communities. It is a new component of a long-running UW diversity initiative called the Information Technology Academy. The first cohort of 10 Native students, including Williams, is graduating from the program this spring and will be in Madison June 3 for a ceremony marking the occasion.

“The program changed my life,” says Williams, who plans to begin classes at UW–Madison this fall.

He had always hoped to attend college, he says, but UW had not been on his radar prior to the program. During a trip to Madison, he was captivated by the urban environment and found everything on the campus “new and exotic.” He could picture himself among the student body.

“I especially like the idea of walking to class every day and running into friends and new strangers,” says Williams, who has always traveled to school by bus or car. “It’ll be an experience I’ve never had before.”

The initiative is one of the most direct ways university administrators are trying to increase enrollment of American Indian students, currently estimated at just under 1 percent of 43,336 students.

A little background: The Academic Technology Department of the UW’s Division of Information Technology created the Information Technology Academy (ITA) 17 years ago. There are now three programs under its umbrella. All work to increase the number of students of color at UW–Madison and in the field of information technology — two areas where historically they’ve been underrepresented.

ITA Madison, the original program, began in 2000 and works with students from Madison public schools. Three years ago, the tribal component was added to more explicitly recruit American Indian students. It is called ITA’s Tribal Technology Institute and serves two communities: the Oneida Nation near Green Bay and the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin.

View entire article here

NIEA Statement on the White House Budget Blueprint

Washington, D.C.– The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) issues the following analysis regarding the White House’s Budget Blueprint, “America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again,” released today:

Today’s budget outline proposes a significant cut to funding for domestic discretionary programs by $54 billion for Fiscal Year 2018 (FY 18), including a 13% reduction in the Department of Education (ED) budget, while increasing spending on the military by the same amount. While important educational programs would see substantial reductions, the Department of Defense would see a 10% increase.

The proposed cuts concern NIEA: these programs positively impact Native students. When these cuts are negotiated by Congress, we are concerned that Native education programs are at risk of being reduced.

The 13% cut to the ED would lead to a $9 billion overall cut in funding for FY 2018. The Blueprint provides a look at the programs that may face the steepest cuts, important notes on the Blueprint are below:

  • The following Native education programs are not specifically identified for cuts: the Indian Education Formula Grants (Formerly Title VII and now Title VI), the Alaska Native Educational Equity Support and Assistance Act, and the Native Hawaiian Education Act.
  • $9 billion in cuts to the ED come from programs that are not specifically designed to serve Native students but do impact their education, particularly Native students who attend public schools. Teacher professional development programs see a $2.4 billion reduction, after-school programs see a $1.2 billion cut, and programs that offer higher education assistance for students are reduced by $4.6 billion. These reductions will limit opportunities for Native students if enacted into law.
  • Funding for public and private school choice would increase by $1.4 billion. NIEA has serious concerns about the $250 million in funding for a private school choice program and $1 billion in funding for portability, which risks undermining schools with high concentrations of low-income students. NIEA membership has voiced concerns with programs that support private school choice as recently as this past October, NIEA will be monitoring this proposal closely to ensure the needs of Native students are represented.
  • One part of the Impact Aid Program, Support Payments for Federal Property, was eliminated. This funding of the Program, $66 million FY 16, does not encompass the part of Impact Aid that most directly serve Native communities: the Indian Lands Program is not identified to be cut in this Blueprint. NIEA is nonetheless concerned, Impact Aid in its entirety remains a critical program for Native students and we continue to strongly support fully funding the Program.
  • Head Start is not mentioned at all in this budget outline. NIEA is monitoring funding for this program closely based on concerns voiced over the last few months.

NIEA remains hopeful that the administration will continue to avoid cuts to Native programs in the final FY 2018 Budget which is set to come out in late April or May. We will continue to work with our allies on both sides of the aisle in support of programs that support Native students.

The Department of Interior would also see a $1.5 billion reduction, a 12% cut to their budget, but the Bureau of Indian Education is not slated for reductions. Interior recommitted itself to Indian Country:

  • Tribal sovereignty and the Nation’s trust responsibilities to American Indian and Alaska Natives were identified as priorities for the Department of the Interior. Ensuring self-determination and providing support to tribal governments were acknowledged as responsibilities of the Department.

For a full copy of the entire budget outline, please click here.

To see NIEA’s FY 18 Budget Priorities, please click here.

TAKE ACTION and GET INVOLVED

Native education advocates are encouraged to contact their representatives or senator to express support for full funding of Native education programs.

To take action now, call the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121 and ask to speak with your Representative. They will ask you for your zip code and then connect you. When they do, you may use the following talking points as a guide:

  • I live in _____ and support Native students and Native education. Please tell the Representative that I strongly support full funding for the  [Indian Education Formula Funding, or the Alaska Native Educational Equity Support and Assistance Act, or the Native Hawaiian Education Act]. In my school this critical funding helps serve Native students and it’s important that the program gets the funding we need.
  • I also oppose the President’s proposal to fund private schools through the federal budget. Native students need good public schools, not vouchers which will enable taxpayer money to support private schools. Please tell the Representative to oppose funding for private school choice, also known as vouchers.

Teachers Who Help Us Grow

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Quote from Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, “For teachers, as for students, the most effective evaluation comes from someone who sits beside us and helps us grow.”

ASCD Mission

ASCD is a global community dedicated to excellence in learning, teaching, and leading.

ASCD’s innovative solutions promote the success of each child.

The Education Trust Native Students Fact Sheet

*Click to view the Native Student Fact Sheet PDF

Bowman Performance Consulting

Fact sheet by The Education Trust. Visit http://www.edtrust.org/.

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