New Teacher Recruitment Resource Now Live!

NIEA Announces Launch of Teacher Recruitment Website
The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) is excited to announce the launch of a new resource to support Native serving schools recruit great teachers. In partnership with The New Teacher Project (TNTP), a national education non-profit organization, we have launched teach.niea.org– a teacher recruitment website specifically designed to support Native schools recruit and hire great teachers.
Education connects our past and our future-protecting the uniqueness of our cultural identity. Numerous states across the country are experiencing shortages- Native serving schools in rural areas are often the most negatively impacted. Native teachers only make up only 0.5%of teachers nationwide and our students suffer as a result. This new resource will help Native schools equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to thrive in the classroom and beyond.
Native schools are looking for Native teachers with:
  • Commitment: Culturally-responsive teachers who embed culture into curriculum and instruction–preparing students to graduate ready for college, career, and community success.
  • Adaptability: Teachers with a nuanced understanding of the challenges Native students face, sensitive to the unique cultures of individual tribes and students, comfortable with productive struggle, and responsive to cultural differences while upholding the belief that all children can learn.
  • Instructional Expertise: Teachers who know their subjects inside and out; who understand the importance of instructional planning, using a challenging curriculum to empower students to learn; and who never stop learning and improving themselves.
  • Respect for Sovereignty, Identity, and Self-Determination: Teachers focused on shaping future leaders, honoring tribal languages and traditions, and protecting cultural identity.
  • Qualifications in High-Demand Areas: Teachers with middle and high school, SPED, STEM, and language and culture certification.
Please take a few minutes today and share this opportunity with educators you know. Thank you for helping us protect our most precious resource-our youth, those who will carry on our culture, language, and traditions.
About The National Indian Education Association (NIEA)
NIEA is the Nation’s most inclusive advocacy organization advancing comprehensive culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Formed by Native educators in 1969 to encourage a national discourse on education, NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles- to convene educators to explore ways to improve schools and the educational systems serving Native children; to promote the maintenance and continued development of language and cultural programs; and to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and decision makers. For more information visit www.niea.org.
Donate to NIEA

Whether you’re an educator, a student, or invested in increasing educational opportunities for Native students, NIEA members help advocate for better policies. Your  contribution will help us continue to be effective advocates, train educators that work with Native students, and close the achievement gap.  To donate, please click HERE.

Webinar: “USDA Farm-to-School Grants”

FREE WEBINAR!

USDA Farm-to-School Grant-Application Process: Engaging Tribal Communities & Producers
Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Noon Pacific / 1 p.m. Mountain / 2 p.m. Central / 3 p.m. Eastern

Coming up in the free First Nations Knowledge webinar series is USDA Farm-to-School Grant-Application Process: Engaging Tribal Communities & Producers. This webinar will provide an overview of the FY 2018 Farm-to-School Grant Request for Applications. Learn about the goal of this funding opportunity, eligibility requirements, the application process, and how to set your team up for grant-application success! This webinar is tailored to applicants interested in crafting proposals that will serve Native communities.

Policy Analysis: Native Students and Their White Peers

Many see education as the key to future opportunity and success for children of all backgrounds. However, deeply entrenched inequities can obstruct future opportunities and successes for many American Indian and Alaska Native students (hereafter referred to as Native students). These inequities are apparent in the substantial achievement gap that exists between Native students and their white peers. On national reading and mathematics exams, Native students perform two to three grade levels below their white peers. Additionally, Native students face myriad difficulties outside of the classroom, including high levels of poverty and challenges with both physical and mental wellness.

Despite these problems, opportunities exist for action that could positively impact educational outcomes for Native students. This report provides an overview of the major education issues the Native student population faces and the current policies that exist to address those issues at the federal and state levels.

View State and Federal Policy: Native American youth by ECS online as PDF

Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.

 

View entire report online (PDF)

Fond du Lac Publishes Thunderbird Review Anthology

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College (FDLTCC) has published the fifth edition of its literary anthology, the Thunderbird Review. The 100-page book features writing and art from FDLTCC students as well as residents of northeastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin communities.

*Read more here.

Resource: Food Atlas

USDA Food Access Research Atlas | view map

The Food Access Research Atlas presents a spatial overview of food access indicators for low-income and other census tracts using different measures of supermarket accessibility. Census-tract level data on food access can be downloaded or viewed in an interactive map.

USDA Food Environment Atlas | view map

Food environment factors—such as store/restaurant proximity, food prices, food and nutrition assistance programs, and community characteristics—interact to influence food choices and diet quality. Research has been documenting the complexity of these interactions, but more research is needed to identify causal relationships and effective policy interventions.

*Info from http://crcaih.org/news-and-events/554-resource-food-atlas

Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Department’s Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) announced the Data Retrieval Tool

To protect sensitive taxpayer data, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and the Department’s Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) announced the Data Retrieval Tool on FAFSA.gov and StudentLoans.gov will remain unavailable until additional security protections can be implemented.  Since the online tool was disabled in early March, the IRS has been working closely with FSA to safely return the tool to service.  While the IRS and FSA are working to resolve issues as quickly as possible, students and families should plan for the tool to be offline until the start of the next Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) season in the fall (statement).

Identity thieves may have used personal information obtained outside the tax system to access the FAFSA form in an attempt to secure tax information through the Data Retrieval Tool.

While the tool is unavailable, the IRS and FSA remind applicants that online applications are available and operable.  The income information needed to complete the FAFSA and apply for income-driven repayment (IDR) plans may be found on a previously filed tax return.  Students and parents completing a 2016-17 and 2017-18 FAFSA should manually enter 2015 (not 2016) tax information.  Borrowers applying for an IDR plan should submit alternative documentation of income to their loan servicers after they submit an online application.  Borrowers may submit a paper copy of their tax return, copies of pay stubs, or other acceptable forms of documentation explained during the application process.

Resource: Visual Database

This {FREE} email course is perfect for you if you’ve been wanting to give your presentations a visual transformation but don’t really have a lot of visuals or don’t really know where to start.

Learn more at https://www.echorivera.com/blog/visual-database!

Little Priest Tribal College soliciting Requests for Proposals for its Grant Writing Services

Little_Priest_Tribal_College_1011524LITTLE PRIEST TRIBAL COLLEGE 
REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
Grant Writing Services

Little Priest Tribal College (affiliated with the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska) is soliciting Requests for Proposals for its Grant Writing Services for FY 2016.
Little Priest Tribal College will receive Request for Proposals, mailed, emailed or hand delivered, until 5:00 pm on February 4, 2016 at the Little Priest Tribal College Business Office (Attention: Finance Director, PO Box 270, 601 East College Drive, Winnebago, NE 68701. tatanka.petite@littlepriest.edu)
All qualified proposals meeting the terms and conditions will be evaluated and approval made by Little Priest Tribal College to constitute the most responsive bid for the grant writing services requested.

To receive a copy of the scope of work, please contact Tatanka Petite at (402) 878-3322 or email: tatanka.petite@littlepriest.edu
Little Priest Tribal College reserves the right to accept or reject any or all proposals and the right to waive any informalities or irregularities.

Randy Hella 
20 Canosia Rd 
P.O. Box 192 
Esko, MN 55733 
Cell 218-343-1916 
Email: rhella@interserv.com

NAPE Accepting Nominations for National Summit for Educational Equity

nape

*This information is from http://www.napequity.org/

NAPE AWARDS

Awards on table 300x148 NAPE Awards

2015 Awards on Display

NAPE and the NAPE Education Foundation are currently accepting nominations for its 2016 annual awards, to be presented at the National Summit for Educational Equity in April 2016. Nominations are due January 8, 2016.

SUBMIT NOMINATION!

Awarded by NAPE and NAPE Education Foundation

Awarded by NAPE

Read About the 2015 Award Winners!

About NAPE

The National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity (NAPE) is a consortium of state and local agencies, corporations, and national organizations. Through its four lines of business—professional development, technical assistance, research and evaluation, and advocacy—NAPE strives to achieve its mission of building educators’ capacity to implement effective solutions for increasing student access, educational equity, and workforce diversity.