2017 AIRA Meeting Call for Papers and Posters

The 2017 AIRA Meeting will take place FridaySaturday, and Sunday, October 20 – 21, 2017, with

Pre-Conference Workshops on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

 

The call for papers and posters is now open! Please see http://www.americanindigenousresearchassociation.org/annual-meeting/ for details. Abstracts are due to Lori Lambert (22leaningtree@gmail.com) no later than August 30.

Midwest Comprehensive Center American Indian Education Newsletter: May 2017

view complete newsletter here

NEWS AND OPINIONS

State

Michigan: Michigan endorses its first K–12 Foreign Language-Native teacher in Anishinaabemowin, the native language of the Ojibwe people. Michigan Radio

Minnesota: Minnesota parents call for more K–12 teacher training on American Indian education. Education Week

New Mexico: American Indian students’ academic performance remains well below the national average for Native youth in New Mexico. Albuquerque Journal

Oklahoma: Tribal officials and Oklahoma educators met in Tulsa for a first-of-its-kind gathering to foster collaboration and develop strategies that strengthen education for the state’s American Indian students. Oklahoma State Department of Education

 

National and International

The Montana Office of Public Instruction developed a list of 10 ways to engage students and make rural schools more welcoming for Native children. Indian Country Today

Proposed federal school choice legislation may have negative impacts on American Indian students. Indian Country Today

Research Grant Opportunity: William T Grant Foundation

The William T Grant Foundation funds research that increases understanding in the following areas: 1) programs, policies and practices that reduce inequality in youth outcomes, and 2) strategies to improve the use of research evidence in ways that benefit youth. Research grants about reducing inequality typically range between $100,000 and $600,000 and cover two to three years of support. Research grants about improving the use of research initiative will range between $100,000 and $1,000,000 and cover two to four years of support.

We realize this funding opportunity is not for evaluation; however, many Network members also conduct research. The Research Grants Application Guide is attached to this message.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Research project advances the Foundation’s interests in understanding programs, policies, and practices that reduce inequality or improving the use of research evidence.
  • Research project has compelling relevance for programs, policies, and practices affecting youth ages 5-25 in the U.S.
  • Funds primarily support research activities, not intervention or service costs.
  • Applicant is employed at a tax-exempt organization

The online application for a research grant is now open. The next deadline for submitting letters of inquiry in 2017 is May 3, 2017 at 3:00 pm EST. More information about this opportunity can be found via this link (http://wtgrantfoundation.org/grants/research-grants).

Midwest Comprehensive Center American Indian Education Newsletter: April 2017

   view complete newsletter here

NEWS AND OPINIONS

State

Hawaii: Hawaiians try to convince the state legislature to continue Hawaiian native education at the college level. Hawaii Tribune Herald

Michigan: Malcolm High School uses Running Strong for American Indian Youth grant money to teach a new course on Native American culture. Sault Ste. Marie Evening News

Minnesota: Cultural liaison mends ties between the Native American community and the Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District. Savage Pacer

Minnesota: A group of Rochester parents are pushing their district to provide trainings to teachers on American Indian education and to communicate more about the needs and progress of American Indian students. Education Week

Minnesota: Graduation rates for American Indian students increase as achievement gaps continue to close. Hometown Source

Montana: Teachers share creative ways to teach about the cultural heritage and history of American Indians at the 11th Annual Indian Education for All Best Practices Conference. Helena Independent Record

Oklahoma: A new report from the National Indian Education Study shows Oklahoma’s American Indian students leading the nation in fourth- and eighth-grade reading and math scores. Examiner Enterprise

South Dakota: Native American Education Program brings recognition to Native culture in the Hot Springs community. Rapid City Journal

Utah: The Nebo Indian Education program held a Title VI Storytelling Night featuring storytellers who shared their cultural knowledge through hand drum songs and dances. NEBO

Wyoming: Legislators pass an Indian Education for All bill that will provide education materials for the 48 school districts across the state. Billings Gazette

 

 

Navigating Culture and Care Series

The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH—pronounced “KIRK-uh”) is offering a series on Navigating Culture Care, presented by Jennifer Prasek.

The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) brings together tribal communities and health researchers within SD, ND, and MN. Our goal is to build tribal research infrastructure and transdisciplinary research teams to improve American Indian health through examination of social and environmental influences on health.

CRCAIH helps tribal communities and health professionals plan and perform research addressing the health issues of American Indians (AI) in South Dakota, North Dakota, and Minnesota.

Jennifer Prasek

Jennifer Prasek is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe in South Dakota. Raised in SD, she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Minnesota. She began her career in Human Resources, and has applied her experience in project management and Diversity & Inclusion into the design, implementation and training of cultural, human resources, conflict resolution and team building models for various organizations across the region.

Jen works with organizations looking to enhance their scope and impact. She provides consultation related to long-term strategic planning, grant development, process improvement, human resources and performance management, organizational leadership and development, cultural sensitivity and community engagement.

For more information, please contact Jen at prakotallc@outlook.com.

Video: Collaborations with Native American Nations: Community Based Participatory Research

Please watch and share Team Roswell’s journey and approach to community based research efforts in Native American communities.

The piece helps create awareness, education, and notes the importance of Employee Assistance Programs as a means of prevention and intervention.

Special thanks to Roswell Park’s Office of Cancer Health Disparities Research, RPCI’s Health Behavior and Health Communications Resource Team, and our community media partner, Western Door Productions (Gary Sundown). An additional thanks to academic champion and actor Dr. Evan Adams for sharing insights to workplace health (a.k.a. “Thomas-Builds-the-Fire”; Smoke Signals)

Embedding Spiritual & Sustainable Wisdom in Education and Research

13th Annual Aboriginal Education Research Forum ‘Shawane Dagosiwin’ – 5th Annual Canadian Symposium on Indigenous Teacher Education

Embedding Spiritual & Sustainable Wisdom in Education and Research as an Act of Reconciliation

Faculty of Education Building, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB/Canada

April 24 – 25, 2017

www.edu.gov.mb.ca/aerf/index.html

We are pleased to announce that the 13th Annual Aboriginal Education Research Forum – “Shawane Dagosiwin” is co-hosting with the Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba the 5th Canadian Symposium on Indigenous Teacher Education on Monday, April 24 & Tuesday, April 25, 2017. Location: Faculty of Education Building, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

“Shawane Dagosiwin” (as translated from the Anishinaabe language) reflects the values of, and embraces integrity and respect for family and community in educational research. This year we are pleased to co-host this event organized through a planning committee that includes educators from Manitoba’s universities, the provincial departments of education, First Nations and Métis governments and various representative organizations.

The Canadian Symposium on Indigenous Teacher Education is hosted by various Faculties of Education in Canadian that take the lead in hosting the symposium. This annual event is in its 5th year and has been previously hosted by the University of British Columbia, University of Alberta, Memorial University of Newfoundland, and University of New Brunswick.

Keynote Speakers: Drs. Chantal Fiola & Jean-Paul Restoule

Registration fees (Includes admission to all sessions, forum meals, forum events, and nutrition breaks):

Presenters/posters – $225.00

Early Bird – $250.00 (March 24, 2017)

Regular – $275.00

One day regular – $200.00

Student presenter and/or participant – one day $80.00

Students – two day fee $100.00

We encourage you to register early to facilitate our planning of the conference program.

*info from www.edu.gov.mb.ca/aerf/index.html

Stafford Hood Presents… Carl A. Grant Scholars Lecture Series 2016-2017

Dr. Stafford Hood is lecturing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 6-7, 2017.

Come join us and hear about culturally responsive assessment and evaluation from one of the nation’s leading subject matter experts!  A lecture and brown bag provide opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to interact and visit with this warm, down to earth, and humble social justice scholar warrior.

As part of UW’s Carl A. Grant lecture series, Dr. Hood’s scholarly storytelling will provide a historical and practical way to understand and improve professional practice in this area.   “Continuing the Untold Legacy of African Americans in the History of American Evaluation: Another Installment in the Nobody Knows My Name Project” is Professor Hood’s research which continues to strongly influence the field of culturally responsive evaluation in education.

Dr. Hood is a recent American Evaluation Association Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory awardee, the Founder/Director of the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment, and Faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Continuing the Untold Legacy of African Americans in the History of American Evaluation: Another Installment in the Nobody Knows My Name Project

Professor Hood’s research has influenced the field of culturally responsive evaluation in education by extending the logic of cultural responsiveness from pedagogy and educational assessment to evaluation. His work provided the historical framework that created a bridge between culturally responsive assessment to culturally responsive evaluation.

Presented By:

Stafford Hood, Sheila M. Miller Professor

Professor, Curriculum & Instruction and Ed. Psychology

Founding Director, Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation & Assessment (CREA)

College of Education University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Thursday, April 6, 2017, Noon-1 pm University of Wisconsin – Madison, Ed Sciences Building, Room 259 1025 West Johnson Street

WestEd Justice & Prevention Research Center Update

The Justice & Prevention Research Center (JPRC) has as its core mission providing evidence-based information to help guide policy and practice in areas such as violence prevention, school safety, juvenile and adult criminal justice, and public health. This guidance can come in various ways: through reports and publications, webinars and presentations, technical assistance and training, and by serving on advisory panels and technical working groups.

In this update, we describe a new Justice & Prevention Research Center (JPRC) effort to provide guidance to a large agency providing services across the U.S. to at-risk youth. We also put the spotlight on a National Institute of Justice-funded school safety project getting ready to launch next month in Texas.

Finally, we again underscore the importance of a multi-partner effort, involving the JPRC, to carefully synthesize research to inform the development of new guidelines for Juvenile Drug Treatment Courts. We conclude the newsletter by highlighting a recent blog article on WestEd’s use of regression discontinuity design in the educational context, and a upcoming presentation by WestEd staff at the upcoming crime prevention symposium at George Mason University.

To read complete update click here

WestEd is a nationally recognized not-for-profit research and services firm. The agency’s mission is to promote excellence, achieve equity, and improve social and learning outcomes for children, youth, and adults. WestEd has a long history of effective collaboration with local community, justice, and education agencies in implementing, and evaluating successful programs that promote positive youth development, physical health and well-being, and prevention of risk behaviors including violence.

 

Shakopee Tribe Donates $100,000 to “Reclaiming Native Truth”!

Longmont, Colorado (February 9, 2017) – The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) announced today a $100,000 donation to the Reclaiming Native Truth project that is co-managed by First Nations Development Institute and Echo Hawk Consulting, both based in Colorado. The gift is part of a package of new SMSC donations totaling more than $4 million for Native American causes in several states.

Reclaiming Native Truth is a groundbreaking project that will consolidate and build upon previous research efforts in order to create a long-term, Native-led movement that will positively transform the popular image of and narrative about Native Americans. From 2016-2018, the project team is working with an advisory committee of Native leaders, stakeholders, and racial equity experts and advocates to understand the underlying reasons for society’s negative and inaccurate perceptions of Native Americans. Based on this improved understanding, the project will have the tools necessary to build consensus around tackling this long-standing problem. It is expected that the project will lead to the creation of a national campaign to achieve greater awareness, respect and equality for Native peoples.

“Launching an unprecedented national project like Reclaiming Native Truth requires farsighted dedication from planners and funders. The SMSC’s donation shows a long-term commitment to improving the lives of Native Americans,” said Michael Roberts, co-director of Reclaiming Native Truth and president and CEO of First Nations Development Institute.

“There are so many needs across Indian Country, and this new financial support will go a long way toward improving the lives of many people, especially children and future generations,” said SMSC Chairman Charles R. Vig.

The SMSC has donated approximately $350 million to organizations and causes since 1992.

Today’s donation to the Reclaiming Native Truth project was made less than one month after making a $200,000 gift to fund living allowances for AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers working to improve Native nutrition, as part of the SMSC’s $5 million Seeds of Native Health campaign. It was the first time in VISTA’s history in which a tribe provided funding to deploy VISTA members nationally. In an editorial lauding the SMSC’s Seeds of Native Health campaign, the Star Tribune – Minnesota’s largest news outlet – called the tribe a “philanthropic force.”

Reclaiming Native Truth is co-directed by Crystal Echo Hawk, president and CEO of Echo Hawk Consulting.

Learn more about the Shakopee Tribe