College of Menominee Nation Wins Major Grant

The following is an announcement from Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

The office of U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin has announced a $798,199 grant from the U.S. Department of Education to help provide ACT preparation courses and leadership opportunities to Menominee Indian High School students. The award will be managed by the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) of the College of Menominee Nation.

Project partners collaborating with SDI include the College of Menominee Nation’s teacher education program and digital media program, Menominee Indian School District; Menominee Tribal School; Mawaw Ceseniyah, a community-based Menominee culture and language organization; and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Midwest Region Fire Prevention program. The four-year grant will enhance and expand SDI’s successful youth enrichment program model known as the Sustainability Leadership Cohort. Funding will bring new multifaceted activities centered on fire, which will help introduce language and culture teachings, science, technology, engineering and math concepts, along with leadership and responsibility. The students will gain a better understanding of how Indigenous ecological knowledge and Western science can interact, and how to apply that understanding to address environmental issues both inside and outside the classroom.

The project team will be providing more ACT preparation opportunities for the Menominee Indian High School students to generate an increase in the number of students who take the ACT and apply to college. In addition to receiving ACT preparation, students will work with teams made up of in-service and pre-service teachers, language and culture practitioners, and CMN staff to develop science lessons for elementary classrooms using Indigenous knowledge as the base. This work will take place on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin, at the College of Menominee Nation’s Keshena campus, the Menominee Tribal School, and in the Menominee Indian School District.

Both high school and undergraduate interns (pre-service teachers) will be hired in early 2018. Students will receive a stipend for participation in this program and have the opportunity to present their work at relevant conferences. Funding for the project, titled “Preparing Native Youth for the Future through the Sustainability Leadership Cohort,” is through the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and Office of Indian Education: Indian Education Discretionary Grants Programs: Demonstration Grants for Indian Children Program.

*Blog originally published here.

Faculty Position in Indigenous Community Studies

Open Rank faculty position in Indigenous Community Studies University of
Wisconsin-Madison The Department of Civil Society and Community Studies
(School of Human Ecology) and the American Indian Studies Program (College
of Letters and Science) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison invite
applications for a tenure-track faculty position, open to all ranks in
Indigenous Community Studies.

Position Summary:
This position is for a joint appointment with 50% in the Department of Civil
Society and Community Studies (tenure home) and 50% in the American Indian
Studies Program. We seek a candidate with expertise in community-engaged
scholarship, indigenous methodologies/evaluation, community leadership,
civil society or nonprofits and with tribal expertise. The area of research
is open and may include community/tribal health, environmental health,
community/tribal nutrition, indigenous knowledge systems, traditional
ecological knowledge, community/tribal education, social justice,
incarceration, etc. The candidate’s research should focus on Indigenous
peoples and issues within North America with a particular focus on Wisconsin
communities. The position requires scholarship, teaching, and service in a
department and a program serving undergraduate and graduate students. Other
desirable attributes include strong research methods, oral and written
communication skills and the ability to interact with an interdisciplinary
and collaborative intellectual community. Native American and minority
candidates are encouraged to apply.
Degree and area of specialization:
Holds a doctoral degree in a discipline relevant to the units and position
e.g. psychology, human development and family studies, social work, American
Indian studies, anthropology, education or related disciplines. Employment
contingent upon completion of degree.

The successful candidate will:
– Build community-academic partnerships with tribal/urban Indian communities
especially in Wisconsin.
– Maintain a coherent and productive program of research excellence.
– Seek and secure funding to support research partnerships.
– Teach graduate and undergraduate courses (2:2 load) and contribute to
program development.
– Supervise student research and provide high quality academic mentoring.
– Participate in shared governance and other departmental and university
service activities as appropriate for career stage.

Application link:
http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/496371/asst-assoc-or-full-professor-of-
indigenous-community-studies

Seeking Candidates for CMN Presidency

Position Summary:
Reporting to the Board of Trustees, the President leads the campus community in creating and implementing a
vision and strategy for the future of the College of Menominee Nation (CMN) that is responsive to the College’s
mission and capitalizes on the professional and intellectual strengths of CMN’s staff and faculty.  Leading by
example, the President fosters a strong sense of community and a commitment to higher learning.  He or she
establishes and enhances partnerships and relationships among tribal and external entities that align with the
College’s purpose and educational reputation, promote its sustainability, and serve its community.

Learn More!

An Artful August

August is full of opportunities to support our local solo artists and artist communities. Find the nearest art show or festival and bring the whole family for art exhibits, demonstrations, fun runs and even live art performances!

August 25th-27th

Midwest Comprehensive Center American Indian Education Newsletter: May 2017

view complete newsletter here

NEWS AND OPINIONS

State

Michigan: Michigan endorses its first K–12 Foreign Language-Native teacher in Anishinaabemowin, the native language of the Ojibwe people. Michigan Radio

Minnesota: Minnesota parents call for more K–12 teacher training on American Indian education. Education Week

New Mexico: American Indian students’ academic performance remains well below the national average for Native youth in New Mexico. Albuquerque Journal

Oklahoma: Tribal officials and Oklahoma educators met in Tulsa for a first-of-its-kind gathering to foster collaboration and develop strategies that strengthen education for the state’s American Indian students. Oklahoma State Department of Education

 

National and International

The Montana Office of Public Instruction developed a list of 10 ways to engage students and make rural schools more welcoming for Native children. Indian Country Today

Proposed federal school choice legislation may have negative impacts on American Indian students. Indian Country Today

Shawano Park & Recreation Summer Program Guide 2017 Now Available!

The 2017 Summer Program Guide is now available to get the kiddos signed up.  Music in the Park, youth archery, swimming lessons, summer camps, yoga, community sailing program and many more.  Click here to see the program guide.

The City of Shawano Park & Recreation Department is located at 220 E. Division Street in Shawano. The indoor swimming pool provides a place for children’s swimming lessons, children’s open swim, adult lap swim and various adult classes. The Rec. Center also has a weight room that consists of free weights, treadmills, recumbent bikes, elliptical machines and more. There are 2 racquetball courts available, reservations may be made up to 1 week in advance.

This website provides information about our building hours, fees, upcoming events, programs & more. Please feel free to take a look around. Any questions you may have can be answered by calling the Rec. Center at 715-526-6171.

Midwest Comprehensive Center American Indian Education Newsletter: April 2017

   view complete newsletter here

NEWS AND OPINIONS

State

Hawaii: Hawaiians try to convince the state legislature to continue Hawaiian native education at the college level. Hawaii Tribune Herald

Michigan: Malcolm High School uses Running Strong for American Indian Youth grant money to teach a new course on Native American culture. Sault Ste. Marie Evening News

Minnesota: Cultural liaison mends ties between the Native American community and the Burnsville-Eagan-Savage School District. Savage Pacer

Minnesota: A group of Rochester parents are pushing their district to provide trainings to teachers on American Indian education and to communicate more about the needs and progress of American Indian students. Education Week

Minnesota: Graduation rates for American Indian students increase as achievement gaps continue to close. Hometown Source

Montana: Teachers share creative ways to teach about the cultural heritage and history of American Indians at the 11th Annual Indian Education for All Best Practices Conference. Helena Independent Record

Oklahoma: A new report from the National Indian Education Study shows Oklahoma’s American Indian students leading the nation in fourth- and eighth-grade reading and math scores. Examiner Enterprise

South Dakota: Native American Education Program brings recognition to Native culture in the Hot Springs community. Rapid City Journal

Utah: The Nebo Indian Education program held a Title VI Storytelling Night featuring storytellers who shared their cultural knowledge through hand drum songs and dances. NEBO

Wyoming: Legislators pass an Indian Education for All bill that will provide education materials for the 48 school districts across the state. Billings Gazette

 

 

Hiring: Director of Epidemiology

*View the listing on indeed.

Director of Epidemiology
Great Lakes Intertribal Council, Inc. – Lac du Flambeau Reservation, WI
$52,900 – $79,300 a year

Responsible for planning and implementing technical assistance, public health practice, research and epidemiological support services to Tribes and urban Indian health programs in a three-state region (Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan). Works collaboratively with Tribal, Inter-Tribal, private, state and federal agencies to ensure that comprehensive, quality health data is available and accessible to the Native American population. Actively collaborates with other Tribal Epidemiology Centers nationally to coordinate and prepare timely response to emerging national issues.

Job is based on Lac du Flambeau Indian Reservation but many duties may be accomplished at a tribal service location.

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $52,900.00 to $79,300.00 /year

Required education:

  • Master’s

Required experience:

  • Public Health or related field: 5 years

Midwest Comprehensive Center American Indian Education Newsletter: February 2017

*View the complete newsletter.

NEWS AND OPINIONS

State

Arizona: Native American students from the Havasupai tribe in Arizona have brought a lawsuit against the federal government for failing to provide necessary education support. Pacific Standard

California: The Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians are the only tribal group in the nation awarded a Promise Neighborhood Grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Red Bluff Daily News

Kansas: A group of University of Kansas researchers has coauthored a study demonstrating that the ways children learn and speak the language in a Cherokee immersion school are an ongoing process of renewal rather than a return to an idealized notion of “speakerhood.” Phys.org

Minnesota: St. Paul’s 40 elementary schools are on Year 4 of a program to teach all children in St. Paul about the state’s Native peoples, particularly the Dakota. In These Times

Minnesota: The American Indian Education program at Forest Lake Area High School provides students an activity or project focused on the past, present, and future of Native American history, culture, and current events each week. Forest Lake Area

Wyoming: The Wyoming House has passed a bill requiring that the cultural heritage, history, and contemporary contributions of American Indians are addressed in the Wyoming social studies content and performance standards. Wyoming Tribune Eagle

Boys & Girls Club of Shawano #GiveLocal

Dr. Nicole Bowman, advisory board member of the Shawano Chapter of the Boys & Girls Club dropped off a little gift on their first day working with students. Based in Brener School in Shawano, the club’s mission is to enable all young people, especially those who need us most, to reach their full potential as productive, caring and responsible citizens.