Dr. Bowman to Co-Present LEAD Brown Bag on 3/30

Dr. Nicole Bowman

LEAD and the Evaluation Community of Practice are co-sponsoring a brown bag on AEA Diversity Initiatives, on March 30th

The flyer is below, please share!

*Download the PDF of the LEAD flyer.

Cultivating Self-in-Context as Responsive Evaluators

Brown Bag Tomorrow!

Cultivating Self-in-Context as Responsive Evaluators: Engaging Boundaries, Borderlands and Border-Crossings

Hazel Symonette, Ph.D.

We increase prospects for operating at our evaluator best when we intentionally embrace a contextually-responsive action researcher stance. This involves systematic data-grounded inquiry as an evidence-framing dialogue with SELF as evaluator–vis a vis one’s stakeholders and the requirements of the evaluation agenda and contexts. For excellence and ethical praxis, evaluation practices should be broadly diversity-grounded and equity-minded. They should be socially-responsive, socially-responsible and socially just as informed by the American Evaluation Association’s Guiding Principles and the Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation’s Program Evaluation Standards.  My  holistic systematic inquiry and reflective practice framework promotes empathically scanning, tracking and unpacking WHO? factors in context using an Integral Quadrant model: who is served by whom with whom as embedded in situational, relational, temporal and spatial/geographic contexts. This Activist Assessment & Evaluation approach is a resource for enhancing Interpersonal Validity vis a vis responsive programmatic design and development.

Formative Evaluation by the LEAD Center

We provide formative evaluation to ensure you meet your goals and improve the implementation of your project.

LEAD in the Right Direction…
When funded, we provide you with formative evaluation to ensure that you are meeting your goals and to help you improve the implementation of your project.

*Learn more

Dr. Bowman Spotlighted on Wisconsin Center for Education Research Newsletter!

uw newsletter circle bowmanDr. Bowman was spotlighted on Wisconsin Center for Education Research’s newsletter. She was congratulated for her appointment to LEAD Center.

About WCER

The Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s highly ranked public School of Education is one of the first and most productive education research centers in the world. It has assisted scholars and practitioners develop, submit, conduct and share grant-funded education research for more than 50 years.

WCER’s mission is to improve educational outcomes for diverse student populations, impact education practice positively and foster collaborations among academic disciplines and practitioners.

WCER is an incubator for advances in education policy and practice. It provides services and resources for UW–Madison researchers, graduate students and their collaborators, as well as educators, fundersand communities locally and around the world.

*Learn more at http://www.wcer.wisc.edu/

About LEAD

At The LEAD Center, We advance the quality of teaching and learning by evaluating the effectiveness and impact of educational innovations, policies, and practices within higher education. Rigorous, theory-driven methods and interdisciplinary collaborations anchor our approach to evaluation, leading to the adaptation and dissemination of evidence-based strategies in service to student learning.

*Learn more at http://lead.wceruw.org/

What will LEAD do Next?

Enjoy viewing past projects by LEAD. Stay tuned to see what LEAD does next!

Projects

Advanced Fellowships in Women’s Health HUB Site-VA
Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
Biology Scholars Program
Fair Play
Language, Understanding, Cognition, Intelligence and Data Science (LUCID)
Mentor Training
Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation
Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI)


Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative, 2011-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluators: Sara Kraemer

Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative (AEI) is a University of Wisconsin-Madison program whose aim is to close the opportunity gap in undergraduate courses through changes in course instructor practice and pedagogy. Course instructors attend an eight week immersion to learn about key opportunity gap and diversity issues at U.S. college campuses broadly and UW-Madison campuses specifically, followed by developing and implementing research-based course interventions. In our formative evaluation study, Sara Kraemer has been a member of the AEI team, administering instructor-based surveys and working one-on-one with faculty to evaluate their student data and develop target areas of support. AEI has partnered with the UW-Madison’s HOPE Lab to provide summative impact analysis on student achievement and faculty knowledge and attitudes about opportunity gaps and diversity at UW-Madison.


Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL), 2014-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluator: Sara Kraemer

The Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL) facilitates innovative teaching and student-centered active learning by providing instructional support and resources in unique technology-enhanced learning spaces on the UW-Madison campus.

Sara Kraemer conducted a mixed-methods evaluation study of a Math 112, an introductory mathematics course that fulfills mathematics requirements for undergraduate students. The study evaluated the impact of the WisCEL on student engagement, student achievement, and perceptions about the efficacy of the WisCEL learning experience in Math 112. Formative evaluation included a student survey, a focus group with TAs, and observations of Math 112 classes to asses student engagement. Summative evaluation included a statistical analysis of student achievement scores (i.e., end of course grades, drop rates) of Math 112 courses before they were taught in WisCEL compared to Math 112 coursers after they were taught in WisCEL. Summative results revealed that the WisCEL classroom had a positive impact on student achievement scores (as a whole and across demographic groups) – students were more likely to receive higher grades and have lower rates of drop out in the WisCEL classroom than in the non-WisCEL classroom. The findings were triangulated with the survey and focus groups results to assess how the classroom instruction interacts with the features of the WisCEL space.

WisCEL program managers are using the evaluation findings for program improvement, a proof-of-concept to campus stakeholders, validation of the program’s efficacy, and assessment of transferability of evaluation methods to other WisCEL courses.


Crossroads Project: Intersecting Workshops, Learning Communities, and Research in Biology to Promote Student Success in STEM, NSF-IUSE Program (PI: Loretta Brancaccio-Taras), 2015-2018

Evaluator: Sara Kraemer
Project Site: Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York

The Crossroads Project at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is designed to strengthen the skills, retention, and graduation rates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. The project targets biology majors, and is specifically designed to support introductory biology students in success in the course, as well as progression through the biology or other STEM majors through three major efforts. The three major efforts are: (1) Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, (2) Community of Biology Learners sessions, and (3) Campus as Research Lab. The workshops and sessions are aimed to enhance student learning through development of study skills in STEM and biology and create cohesion and community through structured group-engagement outside of the classroom. The Campus as Research Lab provides an opportunity for students to work like scientists with KCC faculty, by engaging in the scientific inquiry process and conducting basic experiments.

The evaluation study of the Crossroads Project is a mixed-methods design that includes both formative and summative analysis. For the Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, the summative analysis is comprised of statistical analysis of end of course grades for biology students and the formative analysis is an end of course survey to assess student perceptions of the impact of their experience on their academic success. For the Community of Biology Learners, a formative evaluation content analysis of student answers to assignments as well as a written instructor’s log of teaching practices. For the Campus as Research Lab, the evaluation component is a qualitative content analysis of student writing course assignments and an end of course student survey.

collaboration

collaboration


LEAD Project Spotlight: VA Fellowship in Women’s Health

LEAD-center-logoAbout LEAD

At The LEAD Center, We advance the quality of teaching and learning by evaluating the effectiveness and impact of educational innovations, policies, and practices within higher education. Rigorous, theory-driven methods and interdisciplinary collaborations anchor our approach to evaluation, leading to the adaptation and dissemination of evidence-based strategies in service to student learning.

USVeteransAffairs_CloudImplementationAbout VA Fellowship in Women’s Health

The Health Issues of Women Veterans Fellowship Program provides two years of post residency, post-doctoral research, education, and clinical learning opportunities to eligible physicians and associated health professionals. Fellows spend approximately 75 percent of their time in research and education and 25 percent in clinical care at selected VA sites. Mentors of national stature provide guidance to fellows in rich learning environments. Graduates are expected to be role models in leading, developing, conducting, and evaluating innovative research, education, and clinical care in health issues pertaining to women veterans.

Application

To inquire about the fellowship application process and to learn more about the program, interested candidates should email or write to the site(s) of their choice, including a cover letter and curriculum vitae.

*Learn More

Download the LEAD Flyer! Get to Know The LEAD Center: Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination

LEAD flyerDownload PDF!

Download the LEAD Flyer! Get to Know The LEAD Center: Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination

Does LEAD Need You?

Program Evaluation for Proposals

We can meet with you to discuss your program or proposal ideas. Please call (608) 263-4256 or email: cmpribbenow@wisc.edu

Current proposal deadlines

Title: Education grants
Sponsor: Lumina Foundation for Education
Deadline: Ongoing; letters of inquiry accepted year round
Summary: Lumina’s goal is to increase the higher education attainment rate of the United States to 60% by 2025. While the Foundation’s mission focuses on both student access and success in higher education, its emphasis is on attainment, defined as completing associate and baccalaureate degrees and credentials. The Foundation focuses on increasing awareness of the benefits of higher education, improving student access to and preparedness for college, improving student success in college, and productivity across the higher education system. See the website for the foundation’s current funding strategies.
URL: http://www.luminafoundation.org/grants.html


Title: Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP)
Sponsor: NSF 16-552
Deadlines: June 14, 2016 and December 9, 2016
Summary: AGEP seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success for historically underrepresented minority doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty, particularly African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders, in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields. New and innovative models are encouraged, as are models that reproduce and/or replicate existing evidence-based alliances in significantly different disciplines, institutions, and participant cohorts.
URL: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16552/nsf16552.htm


Title: Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs
Sponsor: Institute of Education Sciences, Department of Education
Deadline: August 4, 2016
Summary: IES’s research grants program is meant to provide the public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These grants provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability, and (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education. In carrying out its grants program, IES provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need and will conduct competitions in FY2017 through two of its centers.

The National Center for Education Research (NCER) will hold six competitions in these areas (topics in parentheses):

  1. Education research (Cognition and Student Learning; Early Learning Programs and Policies; Education Leadership; Education Technology; Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching; English Learners; Improving Education Systems; Mathematics and Science Education; Postsecondary and Adult Education; Reading and Writing; Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning; and Special Topics, which include Arts in Education; Career and Technical Education; and Systemic Approaches to Educating Highly Mobile Students);
  2. Education research training (Pathways to the Education Sciences Research Training [NOTE: An institution may submit only one application to the Pathways Training Program]; Postdoctoral Research Training; and Methods Training for Education Researchers);
  3. Statistical and research methodology in education (Statistical and Research Methodology Grants; and Early Career Statistical and Research Methodology Grants);
  4. Partnerships and collaborations focused on problems of practice or policy (Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships in Education Research; and Evaluation of State and Local Education Programs and Policies);
  5. Low-cost, short-duration evaluations; and
  6. Research networks (Exploring Science Teaching in Elementary School Classrooms; and Scalable Strategies to Support College Completion).

The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold three competitions in these areas (topics in parentheses).

  1. Special education research (Autism Spectrum Disorders; Cognition and Student Learning in Special Education; Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education; Families of Children with Disabilities; Mathematics and Science Education; Professional Development for Teachers and Other Instructional Personnel; Reading, Writing, and Language Development; Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning; Special Education Policy, Finance, and Systems; Technology for Special Education; and Transition Outcomes for Secondary Students with Disabilities).
  2. Special education research training; and
  3. Low-cost, short-duration evaluations.

URL: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=282060 and https://federalregister.gov/a/2016-05155

Meet the LEAD Staff!

Staff

Christine Maidl Pribbenow, Ph.D.

Christine Maidl Pribbenow, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at UW-Madison. As a professional evaluator, she uses mixed methodology to assess student and faculty learning, and to evaluate educational programming for various postsecondary institutions and organizations. She has been the Evaluation Director on a variety of programs to increase the number of underrepresented minorities in STEMM, including women and different racial/ethnic populations. As the Director of LEAD, she works with potential partners to develop evaluation plans and after funding, oversees professional evaluators who who conduct the evaluation.


Sara Kraemer

Sara Kraemer, Ph.D., is a Researcher and works on a variety of evaluation projects and programs in higher education, including the Achievement Gap Project, the Delta Program, and most recently the Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL). She also works in K-12 content areas including teacher and principal evaluation systems, measurement of teacher quality, and data-based decision making. She holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from UW-Madison.

 


Nicole Bowman-Farrell

Nicole Bowman-Farrell (Mohican/Munsee), Ph.D. is a Researcher & Evaluator in the LEAD Center. Culturally and contextually responsive educational research, evaluation, and policy studies are central to the work Nicole has carried out over nearly two decades.  By working “with” people and not “on” them Nicole is known as a responsive and effective multi-jurisdictional and government systems subject matter expert.  She has been a leader on educational and government initiatives where Tribal and non-Tribal agencies partner to improve outcomes, capacities, and competencies for more effective, responsive, and impactful programming.  As an evaluator, trainer, and technical assistance provider Dr. Bowman has increased the skills, competencies, and capacities for many university, non-profit, and for profit academic organizations working with Indigenous and other marginalized populations.  In May 2015 Nicole graduated with her PhD from the Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis Department at the University of WI-Madison.  Her multi-jurisdictional educational policy study was the first in the country to examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools.   Dr. Bowman currently is an active elected leader, international annual conference trainer, and/or an appointed advisory member for several work groups under the American Evaluation Association, the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment, and the Eastern Evaluation Research Society


Kate McCleary

Kate McCleary, Ph.D., is an Associate Researcher with the LEAD Center.  Evaluation and assessment has been central to the work Kate has carried out in international education over the past decade.  She uses evaluative practices in examining undergraduate intercultural learning and cultural adjustment, and establishing and reviewing international, university-partnerships within higher education settings.  She was a member of a longitudinal, team-based, evaluation of a girls and marginalized children/youth empowerment program carried out in eight countries through the Minnesota International Development Education Consortium. Kate appreciates the utilization of mixed-methodology in evaluation studies, and has taught qualitative research methods at the undergraduate level.  She values the insight and understanding that her work provides to institutions and organizations with which she partners. Kate holds a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in Educational Policy & Administration with a focus in Comparative International Development Education.

 


Christine Fabian

Christine Fabian, M.S., is an Assistant Researcher focusing on evaluation research for grants and programs related to higher education. Her evaluation experience involves community education programs, NSF funded scholarships, undergraduate research experiences, first-year student engagement activities, and women in STEM. Since beginning work at the LEAD Center, Christine has continued to develop her skills in mixed-methods research, data collection and analysis, survey design, and qualitative data analysis software. She has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Sociology and Rural Studies from South Dakota State University.

 


Mary Mezera, B.S., who has been with WCER for three years and is the Administrative Coordinator for the center. She also assists WCER PIs Sadhana Puntambekar, Marty Nystrand and Sandy Rutherford. She has an associate’s degree from UW˗Rock County in applied arts and science and a bachelor’s degree from Edgewood College in criminal justice.

LEAD Projects

LEAD-center-logoProjects

Advanced Fellowships in Women’s Health HUB Site-VA
Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
Biology Scholars Program
Fair Play
Mentor Training
Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation
Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI)


Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative, 2011-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluators: Sara Kraemer

Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative (AEI) is a University of Wisconsin-Madison program whose aim is to close the opportunity gap in undergraduate courses through changes in course instructor practice and pedagogy. Course instructors attend an eight week immersion to learn about key opportunity gap and diversity issues at U.S. college campuses broadly and UW-Madison campuses specifically, followed by developing and implementing research-based course interventions. In our formative evaluation study, Sara Kraemer has been a member of the AEI team, administering instructor-based surveys and working one-on-one with faculty to evaluate their student data and develop target areas of support. AEI has partnered with the UW-Madison’s HOPE Lab to provide summative impact analysis on student achievement and faculty knowledge and attitudes about opportunity gaps and diversity at UW-Madison.


Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL), 2014-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluator: Sara Kraemer

The Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL) facilitates innovative teaching and student-centered active learning by providing instructional support and resources in unique technology-enhanced learning spaces on the UW-Madison campus.

Sara Kraemer conducted a mixed-methods evaluation study of a Math 112, an introductory mathematics course that fulfills mathematics requirements for undergraduate students. The study evaluated the impact of the WisCEL on student engagement, student achievement, and perceptions about the efficacy of the WisCEL learning experience in Math 112. Formative evaluation included a student survey, a focus group with TAs, and observations of Math 112 classes to asses student engagement. Summative evaluation included a statistical analysis of student achievement scores (i.e., end of course grades, drop rates) of Math 112 courses before they were taught in WisCEL compared to Math 112 coursers after they were taught in WisCEL. Summative results revealed that the WisCEL classroom had a positive impact on student achievement scores (as a whole and across demographic groups) – students were more likely to receive higher grades and have lower rates of drop out in the WisCEL classroom than in the non-WisCEL classroom. The findings were triangulated with the survey and focus groups results to assess how the classroom instruction interacts with the features of the WisCEL space.

WisCEL program managers are using the evaluation findings for program improvement, a proof-of-concept to campus stakeholders, validation of the program’s efficacy, and assessment of transferability of evaluation methods to other WisCEL courses.


Crossroads Project: Intersecting Workshops, Learning Communities, and Research in Biology to Promote Student Success in STEM, NSF-IUSE Program (PI: Loretta Brancaccio-Taras), 2015-2018

Evaluator: Sara Kraemer
Project Site: Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York

The Crossroads Project at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is designed to strengthen the skills, retention, and graduation rates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. The project targets biology majors, and is specifically designed to support introductory biology students in success in the course, as well as progression through the biology or other STEM majors through three major efforts. The three major efforts are: (1) Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, (2) Community of Biology Learners sessions, and (3) Campus as Research Lab. The workshops and sessions are aimed to enhance student learning through development of study skills in STEM and biology and create cohesion and community through structured group-engagement outside of the classroom. The Campus as Research Lab provides an opportunity for students to work like scientists with KCC faculty, by engaging in the scientific inquiry process and conducting basic experiments.

The evaluation study of the Crossroads Project is a mixed-methods design that includes both formative and summative analysis. For the Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, the summative analysis is comprised of statistical analysis of end of course grades for biology students and the formative analysis is an end of course survey to assess student perceptions of the impact of their experience on their academic success. For the Community of Biology Learners, a formative evaluation content analysis of student answers to assignments as well as a written instructor’s log of teaching practices. For the Campus as Research Lab, the evaluation component is a qualitative content analysis of student writing course assignments and an end of course student survey.

* Information from http://lead.wceruw.org/projects.html