Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017 by Jayne Corso

Posted: 30 Sep 2017 05:06 AM PDT

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017 is just a month away! I have compiled a few ways you can prepare for joining us in Washington D.C. using some social media tools.

Hot Tip: Follow AEA on Social Media

Follow AEA on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the conference. We will be sharing key deadlines, education updates, and announcements about what to except during Evaluation 2017.

Hot Tip: Follow #Eval17 on Twitter

If you are active on Twitter, start following our conference hashtag, #Eval17. Many members of the evaluation community are using this hashtag to discuss their presentations and start conversations before Evaluation 2017 even starts. Don’t be shy, join the conversation!

Hot Tip: Search for Speakers

Connect with Evaluation 2017 speakers on Twitter. Many of our speakers are active on twitter and share relevant evaluation resources. Start following these speakers and make a connection before you step foot in D.C.

I hope these tips help you prepare for your trip to Evaluation 2017. Stay tuned for more tips on how to use social media and connect with AEA online during the conference. I look forward to seeing everyone in D.C.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Explore Ways to Learn from Evaluation

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Sign up Now! Evaluation Conference

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). E

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

Video of our WKKF Oral Health Eval Work with UCSF!

“There had to be a better way.” Native Americans suffer from the poorest oral health of any population in the United States, with staggering rates of untreated tooth decay among children. Valerie “Nurr’araaluk” Davidson, commissioner at the Alaska Health and Social Services, shares how dental therapists have helped a new generation receive better oral health care.

Watch video online here: https://www.facebook.com/KelloggFoundation/videos/1462807733784493/

CREA 2017 Schedule and Early Registration

Early Registration Deadline August 25, 2017!!!

https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017

CREA 2017 4th International Conference

September 27-29, 2017

Update

We are delighted to provide you with this preview of the detailed CREA 2017 conference schedule at: https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/conference-schedule.

As previously noted there will be keynote and plenary addresses by our internationally recognized scholars that include Drs. Gloria Ladson-Billings (University of Wisconsin-Madison),  Ernest House (Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado-Boulder), Teresa LaFromboise (Stanford University), Robin Miller (Michigan State University, and Guillermo Solano-Flores (Stanford University) (https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/keynote-speakers). Additionally, six pre-conference workshops (September 26) on major topics in culturally responsive evaluation and assessment will be provided by a stellar group of scholars and practitioners (https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops).

Finally, we are anxiously looking forward to the American Evaluation Association’s live and webcast Dialogue on Race and Class that will be held on September 28 at the conference with panelists: Joan LaFrance, Owner of Mekinak Consulting and enrolled Citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, Belcourt North Dakota; Amanda Lewis, Professor of African American Studies at the University of Illinois, Chicago; Alden Loury, Director of Research and Evaluation, Metropolitan Planning Commission; Robin Lin Miller, Professor of Ecological – Community Psychology at Michigan State University; Susan Smith Richardson, Editor and Publisher, The Chicago Reporter; and Susana Vasquez, Vice President of Strategic Partnerships; https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/aea-race-and-class-dialogue

Abbreviated list of confirmed conference program participants:

James D. Anderson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sharon Nelson Barber, WestEd

Katrina Bledsoe, EDC (Education Development Center)

Peggy Carr, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Henry Frierson, University of Florida

Leslie Goodyear EDC (Education Development Center)

Edmund W. Gordon, (Prof. Emeritus), Yale University and Teachers College, Columbia University

Drew Gitomer, Rutgers University

Jennifer Greene, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Melvin Hall, Northern Arizona University

Rodney Hopson, George Mason University

Karen Kirkhart, Syracuse University

Donna Mertens, (Prof. Emeritus), Gallaudet University

Kathryn Newcomer, George Washington University

Joe O’Hara, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland

Lynda Pura-Watson Education Review Office, Wellington New Zealand

Claudia Rankins, National Science Foundation

Katherine Ryan, (Prof. Emeritus) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Hazel Symonette, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Katherine Tibbetts, Liliʻuokalani Trust (Honolulu HI)

New Mexico Evaluators – Events

    • 11 Sep 2017
    • 5:30 PM
    • Hotel Parq Central Rooftop Apothecary


    Please join us September 11th at 5:30pm on the rooftop of the beautiful Hotel Parq Central to kick off the Conference and meet all our presenters, including Dr. Stafford Hood, our keynote presenter, over snacks and drinks. Cash bar available.

    For directions see www.hotelparqcentral.com.

    To register for the full day conference September 12, go to NM Evaluators 2017 Annual Conference

    For hotel rates to stay at the beautiful Hotel Parq Central, see: Parq Central NM Evaluators Conference Rate.pdf

    • 12 Sep 2017
    • 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM
    • State Bar of New Mexico

    The conference will feature a keynote presentation by Dr. Stafford Hood titled, The Journey of One Aspiring Culturally Responsive Evaluator and Lessons Learned Along the Way: A Welcomed Return to New Mexico. The conference will also feature a series of sessions related to Social Justice and Evaluation with amazing speakers who include: 

    • Claudia Isaac
    • Jessica Goodkind
    • Kathy Isaacson
    The conference will take place at the State Bar of New Mexico and will include breakfast, lunch and snacks.
     
    Register soon as space is limited! Deadline to register is September 4th.
    Meet the Presenters Reception
     
    We will be hosting a special reception on the rooftop of the beautiful Parc Central Hotel the evening before the conference to allow attendees to get to know the presenters, including our keynote presenter, Dr. Stafford Hood. 
     
    Register for the reception separately at: Meet the Presenters Reception

    Hotel Accommodations

    Conference attendees can stay at the Hotel Parq Central for $128/night. All Hotel Parq Central guest room rates include a complimentary upscale continental breakfast, shuttle transportation to and from the airport and within a 3-mile radius, on-site parking and complimentary internet access. Go to Parq Central NM Evaluators Conference Rate.pdf for details.

    Student Poster Session

    Students are eligible to submit new or previously presented posters during the conference’s student poster session to be held after lunch on the day of the conference. If you would like to present a poster, you will be asked for a title (or tentative title) during registration.

    About Dr. Stafford Hood

    Stafford Hood is the Sheila M. Miller Professor of Education and Founding Director of the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (http://crea.education.illinois.edu) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he also holds appointments as Professor of Curriculum & Instruction and Educational Psychology. He has also served as the Associate Dean for Research and Research Education in the College of Education and Head of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Previously he served as Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Psychology in Education in the College of Education at Arizona State University.

    Dr. Hood’s recent scholarly publications have primarily focused on culturally responsive evaluation, African American evaluators during the Pre-Brown v. Board of Education period, and the importance of culture/cultural context in program evaluation.  He has served as a program evaluation and testing consultant to the federal government, state governments, local school districts, universities, and private foundations as well as internationally in New Zealand and Ireland. He was inducted as a 2016 Fellow of the American Educational Research Association, received the American Evaluation Association’s 2015 Paul F. Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory Award and in 2014 an honorary appointment as Adjunct Professor in the School of Education Studies at Dublin City University (Dublin Ireland).

Evaluation 2017

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503