Call for Proposals: A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

March 19-20, 2018

Sponsored by

The Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI), University of Minnesota

The University of Melbourne (Australia) Centre for Program Evaluation

Claremont Graduate University

The Teaching of Evaluation Topical Interest Group of the American Evaluation Association

The purpose of this working conference is to engage evaluation trainers, instructors, and faculty to begin a formal discussion of the current status of the education and training of program evaluators. The conference will address a range of essential questions, including:

– What are foundational questions in the area of evaluation education, and how can researchers and practitioners collaborate to describe and
explore them together?
– What are the risks of not addressing evaluation education with data-driven questions and solutions?
– What research exists on evaluator education/training, and what is needed?
– How can research on evaluation education be strengthened?

We seek proposals from people who are actively engaged in evaluation education practice so we can establish a collaborative, professional community of individuals charged with teaching the current and future generations of evaluators.

A number of presentation opportunities are available for participants to share their theoretical and empirical work on evaluation education. We are requesting proposals for presentations of 3-5 minutes on a variety of topics related to the education and training of evaluators, including, but not limited to, the following:

– Conceptual framings of evaluator and evaluation education/training
– Research on evaluator and evaluation education/training
– The status and future of evaluation educators in different settings (e.g., university, paid professional development, conferences, in-house
trainings, on-line)
– The role of competencies in curriculum development
– Pedagogy for the practice of evaluation
– Assessing learning and impact from evaluator education/training programs
– The appropriateness and potential of program accreditation and/or evaluator credentialing
– Good questions to shape our vision and future work

All proposals will undergo peer-review for content and fit with conference goals.  For your work to be considered, please complete the application at https://goo.gl/forms/DjzyHmozZtj9lITQ2 and submit your form by January 15, 2018.

Anticipated benefits of this conference and the pre-work leading to it include the following:

Benefits for participants

·         Adding a conference presentation to your resume or CV
·         Establishing connections with others working in evaluation education
·         Participating in a conversation that will shape the research agenda and future of evaluator education

Potential benefits for participants over time

·         Collaborative research and eventual; publications on key topics identified
·         Participation in AEA conference panel presentations in coming years
·         Access to an ongoing community working on cutting edge research to improve teaching practice

The working conference will occur concurrently with the annual Spring Training of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute. It will begin at
5:00 PM on Monday, March 19, 2018 with an introductory working session and dinner, then continue throughout the day on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, with presentations in the morning and early afternoon and ending with agenda setting and final debriefing. There will be no cost to attend the working conference, although participants can attend the MESI conference for an additional fee.  See www.evaluation.umn.edu for details and more information.

IPE TIG Week: Introduction to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG by Erica Roberts and Nicole Bowman

Erica Roberts

Hello and welcome to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG Week (November 19-24)! I am Erica Blue Roberts, a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, IPE TIG Program Chair, and AEA GEDI alumnus. And I’m Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape) the IPE TIG Chair. As we approach the Colonial celebration and Federal holiday of Thanksgiving, let us reflect on, redefine our understandings, and redirect our behaviors regarding the Original inhabitants of Turtle Island (North America) and Kukuna Auhy (Mother Earth). Together we can move from cultural appropriation and romanticized notions of the first Thanksgiving, to a cultural appreciation for the ongoing contributions by Indigenous people that isn’t limited by a holiday or season.

The IPE TIG was established in 2006 to give voice and recognition to the Indigenous members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and begin to infuse Indigenous evaluation practices into more mainstream evaluation. Indigenous evaluation approaches were developed as culturally-responsive ways of evaluating programs in Indigenous communities. Indigenous evaluation often values and incorporates Indigenous knowledge, recognizes the negative history of evaluation imposed on many Indigenous communities, and respects tribal and data sovereignty. For more information about Indigenous evaluation, look to the work of IPE TIG Founder – Joan France, IPE TIG Founder – Fiona Cram, IPE TIG Chair – Nicky Bowman, and IPE TIG Program Chair – Erica Roberts.

The IPE TIG strives to achieve the following goals to improve evaluation practices and methods:

  • Developing and disseminating knowledge that helps assure that evaluations in which Indigenous people are among the major stakeholders are culturally responsive and respectful of their interests and rights.
  • Creating a venue for Indigenous evaluators and others working in Indigenous contexts to participate in discourse about evaluation models and methods that support Indigenous values, practices, and ways of knowing.
  • Mentoring and emerging evaluators interested in evaluation in various Indigenous contexts.

This week you will get a chance to read about a variety of Indigenous evaluation topics from the TIG Leadership and its members. We chose to blog this week as it is the week of the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when many misconceptions about American Indians and Alaska Natives are shared. We hope that by providing you with an overview of Indigenous evaluation, you may be inspired to look into other ways that Indigenous knowledge can be integrated into mainstream practices and understandings.

Rad Resources:

To learn more about the IPE TIG, please visit our website., become a member, and check us out on Facebook and Twitter.

No More Pranks-Giving:  How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee) Native Appropriations website and blog is an interactive forum for discussing representations and contributions of Native peoples.

Rethinking Schools Blog Archives on “Rethinking Thanksgiving:  Myths and Misgivings

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG week. All posts this week are contributed by members of the IPE Topical Interest Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

*Info originally posted: http://aea365.org/blog/ipe-tig-week-introduction-to-the-indigenous-peoples-in-evaluation-tig-by-erica-roberts-and-nicole-bowman/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+aea365+%28AEA365%29

Position Announcement: Coordinator for Assessment and Evaluation University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Coordinator for Assessment and Evaluation

Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Office of the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is seeking to hire a Coordinator for Assessment and Evaluation to join our team. The Coordinator will assist with managing evaluation projects, institutional and program-level learning outcomes assessment, as well as other related duties that emerge in the Provost’s office. Further details can be found at https://jobs.illinois.edu/academic-job-board/job-details?jobID=86570&job=coordinator-for-assessment-and-evaluation-office-of-the-provost-and-vice-chancellor-for-academic-affairs-a1700645

 

Graphic Facilitation Training for Evaluators!

 

A one-day, hands-on introduction to visual thinking
and graphic facilitation.

The power to clarify thinking, create shared understanding and to make positive change is at your fingertips. All you need is paper and pen.

In this interactive and engaging full-day workshop, Brandy Agerbeck shares her solid gold lessons from over 20 years’ experience as a graphic facilitator creating live, large-scale drawings for her clients. She’ll give you concrete, accessible tips on HOW to reclaim drawing as your best thinking tool and important reasons WHY visuals are vital to helping groups understanding and improve their work.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the basic principles of graphic facilitation, practice it, and understand some of the business basics (e.g., hiring a graphic facilitator, consulting as a graphic facilitator)
  • Bring together a diverse group of evaluators, artists, and communication design students for peer mentorship
Why Graphic Facilitation?

In 2016, ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Inc. identified one of the leaders in graphic facilitation, Brandy Agerbeck, was right next door in Chicago! We’ve been working ever since to bring her to Wisconsin. In partnership with the Milwaukee Art Institute and Design (MIAD), we are excited to bring you this training. 3 out of 4 learners are visual thinkers. Millennials are taking the reigns – leading in all sectors from government to nonprofit. They use visual tools and social media more than their predecessors. To facilitate evaluation use, we need to do things differently – like getting data out there that speaks to visual decision-makers. We also see the void of this skill in the Milwaukee area (and likely the state). This event is the first step in getting more graphic facilitators working in our community providing this service – and it’s starting with the ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Inc. community.

We also want to make connections to the graphic illustrators and artists so we invited MIAD to join us. At the training there will be lots of opportunity to work with artists, artist communities of practice from around the state, and artists of color. Thank you Dale Schilder, Chair of Graphic Illustration for joining us on this journey!

You can Draw
Can evaluators draw a square box? YES!!!! We asked Brandy if evaluators could really do her training. She said yes, we know the content which makes us the best type of training participant. The drawing part is easy, distilling the content to obtain an accurate record of the meeting is A LOT harder!
Don’t live in Milwaukee? Come anyway!
We are sharing the dates early so that we can have as many non-Milwaukee evaluators and artists participate as possible. Space is limited and we are inviting artists from many communities to join us so book today!
Get Your Name Out There
This training is worth hundreds of dollars. Brandy usually charges over $1K for a single participant. To cover the cost of our training ($60 for members), we would like to offer $25 advertisements (logos only) to be included in the training manual insert. The advertisement guidelines can be found here.

 

¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Members: $60
Non-members: $60 until Dec. 15th, then $100 (hurry and register soon!)

MIAD Students: To register, contact Dale Schilder

Light refreshments, lunch and art supplies included

Friday, January 26, 2018
9:00 am to 4:00 pmMilwaukee Institute for Art and Design
273 E. Erie St., Milwaukee, WI 53202

Parking
Italian Community Center – $5

Pre-Order Books – special discounts for our training participants! Pre-order Brandy’s books by December 31st at a 20% discount at: www.loosetooth.com/events/mke

 

Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017 by Jayne Corso

Posted: 30 Sep 2017 05:06 AM PDT

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017 is just a month away! I have compiled a few ways you can prepare for joining us in Washington D.C. using some social media tools.

Hot Tip: Follow AEA on Social Media

Follow AEA on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the conference. We will be sharing key deadlines, education updates, and announcements about what to except during Evaluation 2017.

Hot Tip: Follow #Eval17 on Twitter

If you are active on Twitter, start following our conference hashtag, #Eval17. Many members of the evaluation community are using this hashtag to discuss their presentations and start conversations before Evaluation 2017 even starts. Don’t be shy, join the conversation!

Hot Tip: Search for Speakers

Connect with Evaluation 2017 speakers on Twitter. Many of our speakers are active on twitter and share relevant evaluation resources. Start following these speakers and make a connection before you step foot in D.C.

I hope these tips help you prepare for your trip to Evaluation 2017. Stay tuned for more tips on how to use social media and connect with AEA online during the conference. I look forward to seeing everyone in D.C.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Explore Ways to Learn from Evaluation

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Sign up Now! Evaluation Conference

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). E

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery