Call for Proposals: A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training


A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

March 19-20, 2018

Sponsored by

The Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI), University of Minnesota

The University of Melbourne (Australia) Centre for Program Evaluation

Claremont Graduate University

The Teaching of Evaluation Topical Interest Group of the American Evaluation Association

The purpose of this working conference is to engage evaluation trainers, instructors, and faculty to begin a formal discussion of the current status of the education and training of program evaluators. The conference will address a range of essential questions, including:

– What are foundational questions in the area of evaluation education, and how can researchers and practitioners collaborate to describe and
explore them together?
– What are the risks of not addressing evaluation education with data-driven questions and solutions?
– What research exists on evaluator education/training, and what is needed?
– How can research on evaluation education be strengthened?

We seek proposals from people who are actively engaged in evaluation education practice so we can establish a collaborative, professional community of individuals charged with teaching the current and future generations of evaluators.

A number of presentation opportunities are available for participants to share their theoretical and empirical work on evaluation education. We are requesting proposals for presentations of 3-5 minutes on a variety of topics related to the education and training of evaluators, including, but not limited to, the following:

– Conceptual framings of evaluator and evaluation education/training
– Research on evaluator and evaluation education/training
– The status and future of evaluation educators in different settings (e.g., university, paid professional development, conferences, in-house
trainings, on-line)
– The role of competencies in curriculum development
– Pedagogy for the practice of evaluation
– Assessing learning and impact from evaluator education/training programs
– The appropriateness and potential of program accreditation and/or evaluator credentialing
– Good questions to shape our vision and future work

All proposals will undergo peer-review for content and fit with conference goals.  For your work to be considered, please complete the application at and submit your form by January 15, 2018.

Anticipated benefits of this conference and the pre-work leading to it include the following:

Benefits for participants

·         Adding a conference presentation to your resume or CV
·         Establishing connections with others working in evaluation education
·         Participating in a conversation that will shape the research agenda and future of evaluator education

Potential benefits for participants over time

·         Collaborative research and eventual; publications on key topics identified
·         Participation in AEA conference panel presentations in coming years
·         Access to an ongoing community working on cutting edge research to improve teaching practice

The working conference will occur concurrently with the annual Spring Training of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute. It will begin at
5:00 PM on Monday, March 19, 2018 with an introductory working session and dinner, then continue throughout the day on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, with presentations in the morning and early afternoon and ending with agenda setting and final debriefing. There will be no cost to attend the working conference, although participants can attend the MESI conference for an additional fee.  See for details and more information.

NIH STEP-UP 11th & 12th Grade High School Portal Open


National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK)

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

2017 American Indian/Alaska Native High School
The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held in Washington, D.C.
  • Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or permanent legal resident of U.S.- affiliated territory
  • High school junior or senior (at the time of application)
  • Must meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Part of an underrepresented racial or ethnic group (American Indian/Alaska Native).
    • Disadvantage as defined by annual family income
    • First generation in family to attend college
    • Diagnosed with a disability limiting one or more major life activities

Principal Investigator: Dr. Carolee Dodge-Francis
American Indian Research & Education Center (AIREC)

Apply at:
(If you are a new participant register as a new user and don’t forget to store your email/username and passcode, you will need later if you are a returning, second year use last years’ information)
Apply October 15, 2017 through February 15, 2018
Apply Now


ELPA’s PhD Cohort in K-12 Leadership

4th PhD Cohort to start Fall 2018. Application deadline is January 1st, 2018.

View the PDF for details!

Most States Plan To Use Student Absences To Measure School Success

How do you judge how good a school is? Test scores? Culture? Attendance?

In the new federal education law (the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA) states are asked to use five measures of student success. The first four are related to academics — like annual tests and graduation rates. The fourth measures proficiency of English language learners.

The fifth is the wild card — aimed at measuring “student success or school quality” — and the law leaves it to states to decide.

Learn More!

10 Tips for Creating a Fertile Environment for Kids’ Creativity and Growth


There’s a common misconception that the best way to encourage children’s creativity is simply to get out of the way and let them be creative. Although it’s certainly true that children are naturally curious and inquisitive, they need support to develop their creative capacities and reach their full creative potential.

Supporting children’s development is always a balancing act: how much structure, how much freedom; when to step in, when to step back; when to show, when to tell, when to ask, when to listen.

Learn More!

Webinar: “USDA Farm-to-School Grants”


USDA Farm-to-School Grant-Application Process: Engaging Tribal Communities & Producers
Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Noon Pacific / 1 p.m. Mountain / 2 p.m. Central / 3 p.m. Eastern

Coming up in the free First Nations Knowledge webinar series is USDA Farm-to-School Grant-Application Process: Engaging Tribal Communities & Producers. This webinar will provide an overview of the FY 2018 Farm-to-School Grant Request for Applications. Learn about the goal of this funding opportunity, eligibility requirements, the application process, and how to set your team up for grant-application success! This webinar is tailored to applicants interested in crafting proposals that will serve Native communities.

Policy Analysis: Native Students and Their White Peers

Many see education as the key to future opportunity and success for children of all backgrounds. However, deeply entrenched inequities can obstruct future opportunities and successes for many American Indian and Alaska Native students (hereafter referred to as Native students). These inequities are apparent in the substantial achievement gap that exists between Native students and their white peers. On national reading and mathematics exams, Native students perform two to three grade levels below their white peers. Additionally, Native students face myriad difficulties outside of the classroom, including high levels of poverty and challenges with both physical and mental wellness.

Despite these problems, opportunities exist for action that could positively impact educational outcomes for Native students. This report provides an overview of the major education issues the Native student population faces and the current policies that exist to address those issues at the federal and state levels.

View State and Federal Policy: Native American youth by ECS online as PDF

Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.


View entire report online (PDF)

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Google Classroom Resources

Google Classroom and Class Roster

PBS LearningMedia added two new features:

  • Class Roster
    Educators now have the ability to create their own class roster, which enables them to assign specific lessons to students and monitor student progress. To find this feature, click “Classes” in the Dashboard menu within the teacher view of PBS LearningMedia.
  • Google Classroom
    A share button to import PBS LearningMedia resources directly into Google Classroom was added. To find the button, navigate to the resource you wish to add and click the green Google Classroom button located to the upper right of the resource’s description.