Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Nicole Bowman Bio Page

Dr. Nicole Bowman

“Wiciwen Niw Kenewak”

Nicole R. Bowman-Farrell, Ph.D. (Mohican/Munsee)

President and Founder, Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC

Email Nicole

Nicole’s IRB (CITI) Certification (2012)

Nicole’s Resume (PDF)

Professional Biography (PDF)

Dr. Nicole Bowman holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis (2015). She also earned a M.Ed. from Lesley University in Curriculum & Instruction (1996) and a B.A. from St. Norbert College in Elementary Education (1993). She has nearly 20 years of experience providing programming and completing research, evaluation, and technical assistance services within tribal and public contexts (rural, urban, and reservation) where scientific rigor and cultural responsiveness are the foundation to the services provided.

In her May 2015 dissertation, Dr. Bowman created and completed a first of its kind national study that used a multi-jurisdictional or tri-lateral approach to studying tribal and public education policy via the lenses of tribal, local, state, and public government educational agencies. She documented the multiple internal structures and steps of how tribal government policy is developed and what influences tribal and public education policy where American Indian students attend public K-12 schools. This study provides a new framework to operationalize how tribal and non-tribal governments can collaborate to strengthen policies, systems, and policy activities that can support educational success and improved outcomes for American Indian students.

Dr. Bowman is a national leader in Indigenous evaluation and has served the American Evaluation Association (AEA) through blogs, webinars, full day pre-conference workshops at the annual international AEA conference, conducting internal environmental audits, providing peer reviewed journal support as an editorial board member for AEA’s New Directions in Evaluation Journal and through other diversity, governance, and evaluation activities of AEA in elected or employed leadership. She contributed to the book Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture & Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory & Practice (Information Age Publishing, 2015) regarding multi-jurisdictional Indigenous evaluation, and continues to build capacities with tribal and non-tribal partners for strengthening human, cultural, and intellectual property protections, culturally responsive evaluation, and tribal/non-tribal government partnerships.

As BPC’s president and founder (2001) Dr. Bowman is BPC’s primary point of contact. She may be contacted at info@bpcwi.com or 715-526-9240

Custom Training and Consulting Upon Request

Bowman Performance Consulting  271 River Pine Drive, Shawano, WI  54166  ♦  Phone:  715-526-9240  ♦  Fax:  715-526-6028

Summer Reading!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

Video: EvalPartners Global Forum

Dr. Nicole Bowman of Bowman Performance consulting attended EvalPartners in the Kyrgyz Republic. Enjoy this sneak peek at the exciting event.

Thanks for watching! Please subscribe to this channel!

About the Conference

The Third Global Evaluation Forum organized by EvalPartners took place in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic from April 25 to 28, 2017. It brought together government representatives, parliamentarians, development partners, foundations, the private sector, universities, the civil society, and the evaluation community to review progress of the EvalAgenda 2020, particularly in support of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and to map out productive partnerships for the future. Testimonies of Forum participants on the significance of the event are presented on Youtube.

Participants to the Forum worked hard, took stock of the situation, and planned for the future, but a recurring theme was the need for strong links among the various efforts to promote quality evaluation in support of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. A concrete result of the deliberations was the adoption of the Bishkek Partnership Statement which was signed in the presence of the Speaker and Vice-Speaker of the Parliament of the Kyrgyz Republic.

About BPC

Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) is a professional consulting and scientific research and evaluation company.  Located in Shawano, WI BPC (www.bpcwi.com) provides services to a national clientele from the public, private, non-profit and tribal sectors.  BPC gathers measurable and meaningful data from clients and their stakeholders/customers so that individuals, programs, and organizations can use the data, improve performance, and build capacity from our value-added services in order to function more efficiently and effectively for the short and long-term.

Dr. Bowman Spotted in ACE Newsletter!

Dr. Nicole Bowman was spotted in the January issue of the Advancing Collaborative Evaluation newsletter, Network News!

*Click to download PDF of newsletter

Calling all Readers!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

Dr. Nicole Bowman Resume

*Download resume as PDF

Nicole R. Bowman-Farrell, Ph.D.

Munsee-Mohican

Education

University of Wisconsin-Madison. Ph.D. Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis, 2015

Lesley College. M.Ed. Curriculum & Instruction, 1996

St. Norbert College. B.A. Early Childhood & Elementary Education, 1993

Professional Positions

President/Owner

Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC, Shawano, Wisconsin. Business and educational consulting service. Professional services include research, development, technical assistance, and evaluation for educational and business organizations. Clientele includes local, Tribal, state, and national organizations from the public and private sector. 2001-present

Evaluator and Researcher

University of Wisconsin-Madison LEAD Center and Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative, Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER). 2016-present

Past Professional Positions

Adjunct Professor, Humanistic Studies Department

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, 2003-2005

Adjunct Professor, Educational Outreach Department

Viterbo University, 2002-2004

Administrator, Professional Development Department

Wisconsin Regional Education Office (Cooperative Educational Service Agency #8). Provided professional development training, grant administration, and school improvement planning for 26 school districts in Wisconsin, 2001-2003

Administrator, Multicultural Pre-College Program

University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, 1998-2001

Educator

Oneida Nation Tribal School and Little Chute Elementary School, Wisconsin, 1996-1998

Significant Projects

Evaluator, National Science Foundation, INCLUDES Project at Northern Michigan University.  Lead evaluator for NMU’s INCLUDES project, a national model for faculty professional development, curriculum development, and service delivery to increase the representation of Indigenous STEM students and professionals within the sciences.  2016 – present

Organizational and Systems Evaluator. Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health. Provided technical assistance and organizational capacity development to set up local program area and systemic performance metrics upon completion of development, provided systems evaluation. 2015-2016

Project Manager and Subject Matter Expert. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary. Multi-jurisdictional Indigenous and educational evaluation for the Strategic Workforce Plan, funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. 2015-2016

Professional Certifications/Credentials

Certified Minority Business Enterprise, Wisconsin Department of Administration

Certified Disadvantaged Business Enterprise, Wisconsin Department of Transportation

Certified State Minority Firm, Wisconsin Department of Commerce

Certified Tribal Vendor for Indian Preference Program, Yurok Tribe, Ho-Chunk Tribe, and numerous other U.S. Tribes

Certified Woman-Owned Business Enterprise, Wisconsin Department of Administration

Working Effectively with Tribal Governments Certificate (Tribal Go Learn Portal)

Contextually/Culturally Responsive Evaluation Institute Training, National Science Foundation and Howard University

Current Professional Service and Appointments

Co-chair, Global Practitioner Task Force

EvalPartners, EvalIndigenous, 2017-present

Appointed Member, Task Force on Member Engagement, Diversity, and Leadership Development.

American Evaluation Association, 2017-present

Member, Content Contributor Network

Huffington Post, 2016-present

Member, Economic Development Committee

National Small Business Association, 2015-present

Member, Environment and Regulatory Affairs Committee

National Small Business Association, 2015-present

Member, Health and Human Resources Committee

National Small Business Association, 2015-present

Member, Leadership Council

National Small Business Association, 2015-present

Member

National Congress of American Indians, 2015-present

Advisory Board Member, Policy Research Center

National Congress of American Indians, 2014-present

Social Media Committee

Wisconsin Women’s Council, 2014-present

Member

Small Business Development Center Board of Wisconsin, 2013-present

Member

Stockbridge-Munsee Historical Committee, 2013-present

Member

Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce, 2009-present

Member, Advisory Board

Gedakina, Inc., 2008-present

Founding Member

Menominee Chamber of Commerce, 2007-present

Past Professional Service and Appointments

Member, Project Advisory Committee

Wisconsin Department of Transportation, 2008-2012

Peer Reviewer

American Indian Alaska Native Crime and Justice Research and Criminal Justice Technology Assessment Project, 2008-2009

Agenda Sub-Committee Member

Wisconsin Indian Business Conference, 2007-2012

Appointee, Governor’s Wisconsin Women’s Council

State of Wisconsin, 2005-2016

Technical Advisor

Wisconsin State/Tribal Relations Board, Intergovernmental Division, 2005-2007

Technical/Scientific Reviewer

Wisconsin Advisory Board, Institute of Women’s Policy Research, 2005-2007

Leadership Advisory Board

East-West University, Keshena, WI, 2005-2007

Board Member, Presidential Advisory Committee

Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, 2004-2015

Appointee, Governor’s Interagency Collaborative Council

State of Wisconsin, 2004-2009

Chair, Quality Assurance

Wisconsin Interagency Collaborative Council, 2004-2008

Board Member and Chair, Indigenous Education Committee

Wisconsin American Indian Chamber of Commerce, 2003-2006

Advisor, Wisconsin Minority Business Opportunity Council

U.S. Department of Commerce, 2003-2005

Selected Publications

Articles, Book Chapters

Bowman, N. (2009). Dreamweavers: Tribal college presidents build institutions bridging two worlds. Tribal College Journal, 20(4), 12-18.

Bowman, N.R.  (2008, Spring). Modeling self-sufficiency. Winds of Change Magazine.

Bowman, N.R. (2007, Spring). Cultural validity creates sovereignty and self-determination. Winds of Change Magazine.

Bowman, N.R. (2005, Fall).  Many trails to entrepreneurship. Winds of Change Magazine.

Reports, Surveys and Assessments

Bowman, N. R.  (2016).  Tribal capacity survey: Summary report. Wisconsin Tribal Labor Advisory Committee (WI TLAC).

Garasky, S., Mbwana, K., Chamberlain, A., Bowman, N.R., Corea, C., Ampaabeng, S., Patterson, L., & Mickish-Gross, C. (2016). Feasibility of Tribal administration of federal nutrition assistance programs – final report. Retrieved from http://www.fns.usda.gov/sites/default/files/ops/TribalAdministration.pdf

Bowman, N.R. (2014). Wisconsin Indian Country demand study for business development and technical assistance services. American Indian Chamber of Commerce of Wisconsin: First American Capital Corporation.

Bonsu, P., Bowman, N.R., Dodge Francis, C., Larsen, E., & Polar, R. (2013). Career and technical education teacher licensure requirements: 50 states and the District of Columbia. American Institutes for Research, Midwest Comprehensive Center.

Selected Presentations, Panels, and Keynotes

Indigenous evaluation: designing an architecture for community and nation building. Co-presentation. American Evaluation Association Conference, October 2016.

Culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation. Research presentation. National Indian Education Association Convention and Trade Show, October 2016.

Asserting sovereignty and building tribal nations using the Tri-lateral Indian education policy model. Co-presentation. National Indian Education Association Convention and Trade Show, October 2016.

Beyond culture and language: nation and relation building. Keynote. Jazzin’ at the Shedd, Chicago, IL, September, 2016.

Culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation: a model for working with Tribal governments and communities. Panel. Eastern Evaluation Research Society Conference, May 2016.

Eleanor Chelimsky Forum on Evaluation Theory and Practice. Keynote. Eastern Evaluation Research Society Conference, May 2016.

Meet the pros: Intermediate consulting skill-building self-help fair. Think Tank. American Evaluation Association Conference, November 2015.

Doing business with Tribal government and other Tribal enterprises. Governor’s Conference on Minority Business Development, September 2014.

Culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation. Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Conference, September 2014.

Responsive Indigenous evaluation – a cultural and contextual framework for Indian Country. Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Conference, September 2014.

Promising pathways for entrepreneurs: selling to Tribal entities and finding corporate funding, Shawano County Economic Progress, Inc. Small Business Association Training, July 2014.

Connect! Local information for starting and growing business. Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Fall 2013.

Start right the first time: a business start-up workshop. Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, Fall 2013.

Grant researching and proposal writing in Indian Country workshop. Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center, December, 2012.

Utilizing Tribal certifications and strategies to leverage NEW business opportunities. Menominee Casino and Convention Center, October 2011.

Grant writing certificate series. Shawano Community Education, 2011-2014.

Certifications, proven strategies, and resources for Tribal businesses. Economic Development Summit at College of Menominee Nation, June 2010.

Strategies, policy, and resource development to maximize Indian economic development. Economic Development Summit at College of Menominee Nation, June 2010.

Using traditional teachings in contemporary business practices, Keynote. Economic Development Summit at College of Menominee Nation, June 2010.

Smart business strategies to survive and thrive in any economy. Menominee Business Center, March 2010.

Taking the mystery out of grant writing and winning. Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, March 2010.

Professionals of color leadership panel. Northeast Wisconsin High School Diversity Conference, March 2009.

Promoting Native entrepreneurship within Tribal communities: Policies and implementation-entrepreneurship and Tribal government discussion. Wisconsin Indian Business Association Conference, February 2009.

Grant writing certificate series. Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, 2008-2010.

Preliminary results and discussion on the Minnesota mapping project. Native Philanthropy Institute and Emerging Leaders Summit, April 2007.

Disproportionate minority contact: Native American data collection project. Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance Conference, October 2006.

Philanthropy as a tool for sovereignty and self-determination. Native Philanthropy Institute Evaluation, April 2006.

On the inside: Building a profile of women inmates in Wisconsin state prisons. 20th Annual Women and Poverty Conference: Sharing Experiences … Building a Future, October 2005.

Utilizing program evaluation to build local assets in Indian communities. American Evaluation Association, October 2005.

Entrepreneurial “Injinuity”: Successful business principles for Native American entrepreneurs. Keynote. Wolf River Chamber of Commerce, Menominee Indian Nation, February 2005.

Youth entrepreneurship, education, and empowerment. Keynote. College of Menominee Nation, August 2004.

Funding opportunities and evaluation considerations in diverse contexts. National Multi-Jurisdictional Conference for Law Enforcement and Community Leaders, November 2003.

Selected Trainings, Workshops, and Webinars

E-Fundraising: A guide to research and fundraising evaluation. Webinar. Native Learning Center, October 2015.

Developing a project concept and pre-proposal preparation strategies. Webinar. American Evaluation Association, June 2013.

Understanding requests for proposals (RFPs) as a foundation to developing a funding strategy. Webinar. American Evaluation Association, January 2013.

Professional and Academic Honors

State Awardee, Wisconsin Excellence in Small Minority Business, State Department of Administration—Governor’s Awardee, September 2014.

Recognized and published in the D.C. Everest Area Schools Oral History Program, Wisconsin Women: Celebrating Their Contributions, June 2011

Arkansas Traveler Award, Governor’s Office, State of Arkansas, July 2005.

National Rising Star Award, Women’s Business Network, October 2004.

National Emerging Business Leader, U.S. Department of Commerce, September 2003.

Young Entrepreneur of the Year, U.S. Department of Commerce, September 2003.

National Evaluators Institute Scholarship, National Science Foundation, July 2003.

Ph.D. Fellow, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis Department, 1998-2001.

Federal Grant Review and Other Experience

U.S. Department of Agriculture: Food and Nutrition Service, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Rural Development

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Administration for Children and Families, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, Indian Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

U.S. Department of the Interior: Bureau of Indian Affairs

U.S. Department of Justice: Justice Programs, Violence Against Women

U.S. Department of Transportation: Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Small Business Programs

National Science Foundation: Directorate for Education and Human Resources, Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences

Small Business Administration: District Office (Wisconsin), Historically Underutilized Business Zones, Native American Affairs, Procurement and Technical Assistance Center, Regional Office (Region V), Small Business Development Center State Board (Wisconsin)

Dr. Bowman to Co-Present LEAD Brown Bag on 3/30

Dr. Nicole Bowman

LEAD and the Evaluation Community of Practice are co-sponsoring a brown bag on AEA Diversity Initiatives, on March 30th

The flyer is below, please share!

*Download the PDF of the LEAD flyer.

Eval Reads

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

No More PRANKS-Giving: How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Koolamalsi njoos (Greetings, colleagues and friends):image1

As the newest Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Affiliate Researcher, I represent the oldest and least known communities on Turtle Island and Mother Earth: Indigenous people.  My Indigenous ancestors and relatives are on nii nooxw waak nii numoxoomus (my father Peter Bowman’s and my grandfather Morris Bowman’s) side of the family. Neekaawa Lunaapeewook waak Mohiikaneewi (they are Lenaape-Munsee and Mohican Indians).  Mohican (not the “last of” thank you very much) and Lenni-Lunaape Munsee (we were “renamed” “Delaware Indians” as we were “relocated” by the Europeans post-contact) are my Indigenous family and community members who arrived on this continent thousands of years prior to European contact in the 1400s, according to our oral traditions. For the reader’s convenience, I will continue the rest of this discussion in the language the colonial people forced upon Indigenous people when they arrived at and conquered Turtle Island (English).

We need to stop Pranksgiving, and this time of year gives us a chance to rethink Columbus and beyond!  So, as we embark on yet another “Thanksgiving” and Native American history “month” I’d like to offer a different, historical Indigenous perspective, “re-writing and re-righting” (Smith, 1999) the western narrative that the American story began when Columbus or Henry Hudson got here, and adding to or correcting the discourse and printed content which often excludes, is ignorant of, or provides a romanticized and incorrect version of Indigenous people’s perspectives, experiences, and contributions.  We were here before European contact, we’re still here surviving and thriving, and we will continue correcting the information regarding our Indigenous communities’ contributions to contemporary contexts.  This includes the wisdom and content that Indigenous people provide to modern-day educational, academic, governance, and other disciplines, topics, and contexts.

I am proud to be part of an evaluation community at CREA that is leading the way to encompass the history, values, perspectives, strengths, and contributions that our collective and strong diversity represents.  Some of these evaluation roots date back decades and some trace back centuries.  Others are unknown and/or are being re-awakened, recovered, and revived as we strive to understand our origin stories and the cultural, historical, and intellectual traditions of our Indigenous relatives and ancestors.  Undoubtedly, our awakening process is as critical to what we create as evaluators: designs, studies, publications, presentations, trainings, and transformative change that are sustained by the communities we humbly serve.  The journey as well as all the people, places, projects, and insights along the way provide a rich context in which we situationally understand more about ourselves, our traditions, our communities, and our broader academic context.

When the historical, contextual, technical, and content knowledge of Indigenous and underrepresented people is not woven into the more contemporary evaluation fabric, we are in conflict and ignoring the very mission, vision, values, and goals that our professional evaluation community (AEA) is supposed to uphold.  If we are to improve, increase, promote, and support activities that make for more effective evaluators and evaluations then as a profession, we must acknowledge, accept, and address the severe lack of equity, inclusion, ethical consideration, and legal protections critically missing from most evaluation activities, curriculum, studies, and discourse.

Current controversy provides a significant example for reflection and consideration.  Within both Indigenous and academic communities, I am often asked about the conflict surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and the #NoDAPL counter-movement launched by human, water, and earth rights protectors from Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.  #NoDAPL seeks to block a $3.8B, 1,100-mile fracked-oil pipeline currently under construction from the Bakken shale fields of North Dakota to Peoria, Illinois. DAPL is slated to cross Lakota Treaty Territory at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where it would be laid underneath the Missouri River, the longest river on the continent, endangering a source of fresh water for the Standing Rock Sioux and 8 million people living downstream. DAPL would also impact many sites that are sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux and other Indigenous nations.

As a culturally responsive community, and as competent and skilled evaluators, we all must understand the cultural, contextual, historical, and legal implications of DAPL and similar projects with Indigenous communities and Tribal nations.  This is one reason why the Indigenous origin stories must be part of the broader evaluation narrative so our “intellectual” evaluative foundations are aware, accurate, informed, inclusive, comprehensive, responsive, and responsible for situating our practice within a much longer and mostly unknown, destructive history than our contemporary publications, agencies, and evaluators acknowledge. Claiming expertise, ignorance, or other falsehoods is not acceptable if we profess to be a global evaluation community.

Like many projects – research, evaluation, and otherwise – conducted with Indigenous people, DAPL has deep, destructive, and illegal historical roots.  The project is in violation of treaty rights afforded the Standing Rock Sioux as a sovereign nation, reflecting the lack of recognition of Tribes as sovereign nations that stretches back to the earliest treaties enacted in 1774 between colonists and Indigenous Tribal nations.  How many research and evaluation projects have been enacted with Indigenous communities to “extract” knowledge and data without due consideration for Indigenous ownership of that knowledge and data?  Far too many!  And this must stop, for ethical, moral, legal, and professional reasons.

Reflecting on the DAPL project reminds us that our broader evaluation community is also about power, networks, and resources.  The perspectives and experiences of the “others” or “have nots” is greatly underreported in our evaluation, academic, education, and other contexts.  We only need to look at who gets funded, published, promoted, elected, or represented on key commissions, editorial review boards, or attends “invite only” events to see that while we talk about inclusion, equity, and diversity, there is little evidence of it in our “community” of practice.  What business interests, amount of dedicated resources, and professional practices are most prevalent in our evaluation community?  It depends on whose conference and what context you are in.  But the interests, practices and viewpoints of Indigenous and other marginalized groups are consistently and significantly absent!

DAPL and the #NoDAPL movement also remind us that our broader evaluation community privileges the written word and values certain evaluation voices – largely white and male – more than others.  A content analysis of AEA journals and evaluation published literature from the 1970s to the present (n=3,305 articles) demonstrates racialized and cultural incongruence issues that are consistently seen between program participants and evaluators stemming from white privilege, wealth inequities, and inequitable distribution of wealth along cultural lines in the United States.  Similar inequities appear when we consider whose voices are heard and respected in discussion around the DAPL project.  For example, DAPL was originally routed through Bismarck, ND, but was redirected in response to the voices of the powerful and political concerns of a municipality over drinking water.  However, voices against the inequitable, unethical, and unlawful treatment of a sovereign Tribal nation remain unheard, not covered by mainstream media as human or environmental concerns.  I welcome emerging voices that tell different stories in different ways – voices like those of Carl Sack, a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is using critical cartography as a culturally-responsive and scientifically-sound method to provide a counter-narrative to the lack of media coverage of the historic, Indigenous and #NoDAPL perspective.

 

black-snake

Figure 1.  Sack, C. (2016). The Black Snake in Sioux country: showing the Dakota Access Pipeline reroute through unceded treaty lands and its consequences.   Retrieved from https://northlandia.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/a-nodapl-map/

Where are the social justice evaluators and researchers?  Who will give voice to the historic and contemporary experiences and stories of the people, land, and destruction based on forced removal and contemporary trauma and violence stemming from DAPL? How is our evaluation community holding up the mission of “generating knowledge about effective human action” when we can’t even make a joint statement about #NoDAPL, let alone send a commissioned group of evaluators to ND?  Surely, the Canadian Evaluation Society and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission give us an example of how that is done!   Inclusion and action are the responsibility of everyone who claims to be a principled evaluator within the larger the evaluation profession.  Yes, YOU are being called to action because knowing better should mean doing better!  Standing Rock is just another contemporary example of centuries of injustices, destruction, trauma, and death dealt out to Indigenous people where most of the world stood by.  I am asking you at #NoDAPL and in other contexts to stand with us as global academic #warriors in solidarity as together as transformative evaluators.  In turn, you too will be transformed.

The bottom line is that I feel at home with CREA.  This is the interdependent place where we engage as family to draw enlightenment, continue to grow, and gather support from all races, ethnicities, contexts, cultures, socio-economic, gender, orientation, different abilities, and other diversity components as strengths to stand with us on the front lines.  Processing our ancient pain or contemporary trauma continues to be largely minimized, ignored, denied, and/or aggressively blocked by most post-contact people, institutions, literature, and systems.  Truly this can be paralyzing at times, and is a problem compounded by the low numbers of Indigenous academics who can add our communities’ voices to the mainstream narrative. So we need support, solidarity, and collegial partnerships.  CREA provides the place for speaking, sharing, and celebrating all that our community brings to evaluation; it is only through the stories, sacrifices, struggles, teachings and strengths of our ancestors/relatives coupled consciously and courageously with our CREA community that many of us Indigenous academics can continue.

In closing, I offer my perspective in the most humble and sacred way.  My words and vulnerabilities are my perspectives alone and are shared within context knowing that some of my Indigenous relatives died on the longest Trail of Tears journeys, were raped and killed by colonists, and continue to be treated as sub-humans suffering, traumatized, and dying on the lands that we were forced to move onto.  Yet we find ways to survive contribute and thrive.  As Waapalaneexkweew (Flying Eagle Woman; Accompanied by the Four Eagles), it is my responsibility to use my life to keep telling our origin and contemporary stories until the day Creator takes me back to the spirit world.  And from my deeply grateful heart, I’m so honored that we’ve created more academic, educational, and community spaces to share the truths of Indigenous perspectives that will continue transform us towards a more equitable and empowered future. I feel your strength, my beautiful CREA family, and I know Indian Country does too.  Anushiik (thank you) for being in it with us for the long haul.  We are one Tribe walking the Red Road, so see you soon.

Sincerely, Critically, and Indigenously Yours,

Waapalaneexkweew and my English name is Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape), PhD

Evaluator & Researcher, University of Wisconsin-Madison (www.wcer.wisc.edu/)

President, Bowman Performance Consulting, Shawano WI (www.bpcwi.com)

If you’d like more information to contextualize my comments, I suggest the following:

 

Bigelow & Peterson (Eds.). (2003). Rethinking Columbus. Milwaukee, WI:  Rethinking Schools.

Deloria, V. (1988). Custer died for your sins: An Indian manifesto; with new preface. Norman: University of Oklahoma.

Deloria, V. (1995). Red earth, white lies: Native Americans and the myth of scientific fact. New York: Scribner.

Hood, S., Hopson, R. K., & Frierson, H. T. (2015). Continuing the journey to reposition culture and cultural context in evaluation theory and practice.  Greenwich CT:  Information Age Publishing.

Tuhiwai Smith, L. (1999). Decolonizing methodologies: research and Indigenous peoples. Dunedin, New Zealand: Zed Books Limited.