Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.

 

View entire report online (PDF)

First Cohort of Native Students to Graduate From UW Madison College Pipeline Program

Tacked to the wall of his bedroom on the Oneida Indian Reservation is evidence of how hard Michael Williams worked as a high school student — an acceptance letter to Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

But the real prize, the acceptance letter to UW–Madison, his dream school, travels with him in his backpack, always within reach.

Growing up, Williams, 18, says he watched too many young people flounder in their attempts to leave the reservation and find opportunities elsewhere. He was determined not to be one of them.

“I’ve always wanted to further my education,” he says. “The more I know, the better I feel personally. And I think college is the step to a successful job and a secure future.”

Williams participated in an extensive college pipeline program sponsored by UW–Madison for students from tribal communities. It is a new component of a long-running UW diversity initiative called the Information Technology Academy. The first cohort of 10 Native students, including Williams, is graduating from the program this spring and will be in Madison June 3 for a ceremony marking the occasion.

“The program changed my life,” says Williams, who plans to begin classes at UW–Madison this fall.

He had always hoped to attend college, he says, but UW had not been on his radar prior to the program. During a trip to Madison, he was captivated by the urban environment and found everything on the campus “new and exotic.” He could picture himself among the student body.

“I especially like the idea of walking to class every day and running into friends and new strangers,” says Williams, who has always traveled to school by bus or car. “It’ll be an experience I’ve never had before.”

The initiative is one of the most direct ways university administrators are trying to increase enrollment of American Indian students, currently estimated at just under 1 percent of 43,336 students.

A little background: The Academic Technology Department of the UW’s Division of Information Technology created the Information Technology Academy (ITA) 17 years ago. There are now three programs under its umbrella. All work to increase the number of students of color at UW–Madison and in the field of information technology — two areas where historically they’ve been underrepresented.

ITA Madison, the original program, began in 2000 and works with students from Madison public schools. Three years ago, the tribal component was added to more explicitly recruit American Indian students. It is called ITA’s Tribal Technology Institute and serves two communities: the Oneida Nation near Green Bay and the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin.

View entire article here

Pick up this Evaluation Book with a Chapter by Dr. Bowman!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

University of Minnesota Duluth 2016 Summit on Equity, Diversity and Multiculturalism Call for Proposals

umdCALL FOR PROPOSALS

University of Minnesota Duluth

2016 Summit on Equity, Diversity and Multiculturalism

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016

UMD Kirby Student Center

To submit your session, please follow the link at the bottom of the page.

The following dates have been set to submit your session.

  • Submissions Open: December 10th, 2015
  • Submission Deadline: January 30th, 2016
  • Notification of Acceptance: February 5th, 2016

The UMD Commission on Equity Race and Ethnicity [CERE] seeks proposals from UMD faculty, students, staff, administration, and interested community organizations for meaningful and interactive workshops, presentations, lectures and other educational formats that address diverse racial, ethnic and sovereign nations. Submissions may address the following broad topics:

  • Initiatives focused on capacity building for diversity and inclusion
  • Methods for developing cultural competence of faculty, staff and students
  • Assessment mechanisms for diversity work
  • Intercultural curricular and course transformation
  • Diversity and inclusion work in the time of Ferguson
  • Strategies to leverage campus diversity to enhance student engagement and learning

To submit a proposal please go tot his link:http://goo.gl/forms/UaJ1gco3A8

For more information about the Summit & to register , 

Click Here

Students who would like to register, 

Click Here

We hope to see you there!

To pay with a University of Minnesota Department EFS chargeplease click here

Price Recommendations

General public: $20, $10, $0 (You choose)
UMD Students: Free (Use the Student Registration link! Will open page for 2016 Student Leadership Conference.)
Professional Accreditation (CEU), please register at the $20 level.

For more information please contact Joie Acheson at acheson@d.umn.eduor Susana Pelayo-Woodward swoodwar@d.umn.edu