Dr. Bowman Contributes to AEA Feminist Issues in Evaluation Newsletter

As we focus on intersectionality, we reached out to members of other TIGs to solicit their perspectives on and experiences with intersectionality. Three colleagues from different sectors and life experiences discuss how they address issues of diversity, equity, and justice in their evaluation work.
Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape), PhD is President of Bowman Performance Consulting and an evaluator/ researcher with the University of WI-Madison. She currently chairs the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG and is a member of the Independent Consulting TIG and Multi-ethnic Evaluation TIG.

In your own words, how would you describe intersectionality?
Intersectionality feels like linear lines but when I practice it, it is round and relational. I enjoy seeing where things “connect” and “are related” (like our Indigenous traditional teachings). So I conceptualize and practice intersectionality as paths crossing on our journey and hopefully paths that continue to circle around and back as I learn and grow from and with others.

Describe your feelings about intersectionality (particularly with gender/feminism) and its impact in/on your work?
Connecting and relations (AKA intersectionality) are central to my life (academic, professional, and personal). And these are not just thoughts but concrete activities and community-based or Indigenous concepts/frameworks that make my work with intersectionality multi-dimensional. They span the realms of physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional as I carry my work out with and in service to others/community. Gender and feminism are only things I have to think about when the western world impacts my life/work. Traditionally speaking there is balance and male/female (and all things) to keep life running smoothly (and work). Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do and gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that feminism also can be inclusive like evaluation should be with different notions of two spirit people.

How can work on intersectionality impact or propel learning to action (this year’s AEA theme)?
Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do within evaluation. Making feminism, gender, or sexuality primarily defined, represented by, and framed via a heterosexual lens is not sufficient and also is excluding a large percent of the population. Feminism, gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that evaluators and the field of evaluation is equipped with the skills, knowledge, and abilities to effectively work with, for, and value our two spirit brothers and sisters.

*Read more here: http://mailchi.mp/7628c56bc902/aea-feminist-issues-in-evaluation-newsletter-july-2017?e=e25a028289