Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011

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Video of our WKKF Oral Health Eval Work with UCSF!

“There had to be a better way.” Native Americans suffer from the poorest oral health of any population in the United States, with staggering rates of untreated tooth decay among children. Valerie “Nurr’araaluk” Davidson, commissioner at the Alaska Health and Social Services, shares how dental therapists have helped a new generation receive better oral health care.

Watch video online here: https://www.facebook.com/KelloggFoundation/videos/1462807733784493/

2018 Mother Tongue Film Festival – Now accepting Film Submissions!

2018 Mother Tongue Film Festival – Now accepting Film Submissions!

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC/USA

http://recoveringvoices.si.edu/MTFF.html

Films will be accepted until September 1, 2017.

 

About the Mother Tongue Film Festival

The Mother Tongue Film Festival, a collaborative Smithsonian annual event, initiated by the Recovering Voices Program of the National Museum of Natural History, celebrates the United Nations International Mother Languages Day by showcasing recently produced feature and short-length films about the cultural richness of Indigenous and endangered languages.

Partners

The Mother Tongue Film Festival is a collaboration between Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Programming support has also been provided by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Funding support for the Mother Tongue Film Festival has been provided by the three Smithsonian Recovering Voices partners across the Institution: National Museum of the American Indian, National Museum of Natural History and the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, with additional support from the Mexican Cultural Institute and the New Zealand Embassy. This program has also received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Submitting a film for the 2018 MTFF? Complete the 2018 MTFF Film Submission Link

Please complete the online submission form – and email RecoveringVoices@si.edu with any questions.

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Video: EvalPartners Global Forum

Dr. Nicole Bowman of Bowman Performance consulting attended EvalPartners in the Kyrgyz Republic. Enjoy this sneak peek at the exciting event.

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About the Conference

The Third Global Evaluation Forum organized by EvalPartners took place in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic from April 25 to 28, 2017. It brought together government representatives, parliamentarians, development partners, foundations, the private sector, universities, the civil society, and the evaluation community to review progress of the EvalAgenda 2020, particularly in support of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and to map out productive partnerships for the future. Testimonies of Forum participants on the significance of the event are presented on Youtube.

Participants to the Forum worked hard, took stock of the situation, and planned for the future, but a recurring theme was the need for strong links among the various efforts to promote quality evaluation in support of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. A concrete result of the deliberations was the adoption of the Bishkek Partnership Statement which was signed in the presence of the Speaker and Vice-Speaker of the Parliament of the Kyrgyz Republic.

About BPC

Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) is a professional consulting and scientific research and evaluation company.  Located in Shawano, WI BPC (www.bpcwi.com) provides services to a national clientele from the public, private, non-profit and tribal sectors.  BPC gathers measurable and meaningful data from clients and their stakeholders/customers so that individuals, programs, and organizations can use the data, improve performance, and build capacity from our value-added services in order to function more efficiently and effectively for the short and long-term.

Video: President of the American Evaluation Association, Dr. Kathryn Newcomer’s Testimony at EvalPartners Global Forum

This video presents testimonies from the Third Global Evaluation forum, organized by EvalPartners.

EvalPartners, the Global Partnership for evaluation capacity development together with International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE) and United Nations Evaluation Group (UNEG) are planning for the third Global Evaluation Forum to be held from 24-27 April 2017.

The GEF III addressed priorities for evaluation during the first five years of the 15-year period addressed by the SDGs. EvalAgenda 2020 was approved during the second Global Evaluation Forum and voluntary collaborative road-map for its implementation was established by the various stakeholders attended the forum.

The GEF III brang together, as previous events, government representatives, parliamentarians, evaluation community, development partners, civil society, and the media to review progress of the EvalAgenda2020, particularly in the context of the Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that were launched in September 2015, are now under implementation and where evaluation is seen as an important contributor to the follow-up and review processes.

Dr. Bowman’s video testimony from EvalPartners & United Nations Evaluation Global Forum in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

This video presents testimonies from the Third Global Evaluation forum, organized by EvalPartners.

EvalPartners, the Global Partnership for evaluation capacity development together with International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE) and United Nations Evaluation Group (UNEG) are planning for the third Global Evaluation Forum to be held from 24-27 April 2017.

The GEF III addressed priorities for evaluation during the first five years of the 15-year period addressed by the SDGs. EvalAgenda 2020 was approved during the second Global Evaluation Forum and voluntary collaborative road-map for its implementation was established by the various stakeholders attended the forum.

The GEF III brang together, as previous events, government representatives, parliamentarians, evaluation community, development partners, civil society, and the media to review progress of the EvalAgenda2020, particularly in the context of the Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that were launched in September 2015, are now under implementation and where evaluation is seen as an important contributor to the follow-up and review processes.

FREE Streaming Films!

Vision Maker will be streaming free films available through visionmakermedia.org and americanarchive.org. One of the available films will be by director Michelle Danforth (Oneida), titled The Oneida Speak during the week of June 20.

The following films will be streaming free in June:

June 13 ……………… Injunuity

June 20 ……………… The Oneida Speak

June 27 ……………… Who Owns the Past?

INJUNUITY

This film is an eye-popping, mind-jolting mix of animation, music and real voices collected from interviews with Native Americans across the country to create a distinct view of modern America from a uniquely contemporary Native American perspective. Every word spoken is verbatim; every thought and opinion is real. Told through nine short films that cover such topics as language preservation, sacred site degradation, consumerism and the environment, Injunuity is a thought-provoking collage of reflections on the Native American world, our shared past, our turbulent present and our undiscovered future.

Producers: Adrian Baker (Hopi) and Manny Lieras

THE ONEIDA SPEAK

This documentary blends traditional Oneida storytelling with modern media, providing a window to a world that no longer exists. In the 1930s, a group of elders from the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin participated in FDR’s Works Progress Administration Writers Project and shared stories of their life on the farm. In numerous journals written in Oneida, the elders recall historical personal accounts of detrimental land-grabbing policies, and the devastating impact of small pox and boarding schools in this film which was nominated for two Emmys.

Producer: Michelle Danforth (Oneida)

WHO OWNS THE PAST?

The final decades of the 20th century brought unprecedented changes for American Indians, especially in the areas of human rights and tribal sovereignty. In 1990, after a long struggle between Indian rights groups and the scientific establishment, the Native American Graves Repatriation and Protection Act was passed. For American Indians, this was perhaps the most important piece of civil and human rights legislation of this century. But a case tested these claims, and Who Owns the Past? focuses on the controversy that emerged with the Kennewick Man.

Producer: Jed Riffe