Suicide Prevention Training in Wausau

Prevent Suicide Conference to take place at the Westwood Conference Center in Wausau, Wisconsin September 21-24, 2017.

Youth Empowerment Part 2: Suicide Prevention and Social Media

Youth Empowerment Part 2: Suicide Prevention and Social Media

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Times:

11 a.m. Alaska
12 p.m. Pacific
12 p.m. Arizona
1 p.m. Mountain
2 p.m. Central
3 p.m. Eastern

The SAMHSA Tribal TTA Center will join the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) and members of their 2017 Champions for Change class for a series of three webinars focusing on youth empowerment in Indian Country.

In Part 2 we welcome Faith Holyan, a 16-year-old member of the Navajo Nation. After losing a close friend to suicide, Faith started #codepurple—a social media-based suicide prevention campaign—to connect peers going through difficult times with friends and loved ones. As a former World Champion in the Indian National Finals Rodeo circuit, Faith uses her title and recognition to advocate for youth suicide prevention and mental health awareness. She also hosts local community events for her peers that serve as safe spaces for discussing mental health-related issues.

Register for the webinar. You will receive a confirmation email. On the day of the webinar, use the link provided in your registration confirmation email. Please join 15 minutes prior to the webinar.

Webinar: Healing Methods – Suicide Prevention in Native Communities

Suicide Prevention Part 1: Healing Methods—Suicide Prevention in Native Communities

Webinar Date:

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Times:

10 a.m. Alaska
11 a.m. Pacific
11 a.m. Arizona
12 p.m. Mountain
1 p.m. Central
2 p.m. Eastern

Register here!

About the Webinar by SAMHSA

Join us as we review evidence-based interventions that have been used in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities for suicide prevention.

In Part 1 of this three-part series, we will look at how programs such as Question, Persuade, and Refer (QPR); safeTALK (Tell, Ask, Listen, and KeepSafe); Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST); and Project Venture have been used by AI/AN communities while acknowledging cultural differences.

Hope Squad, Reducing Suicides

Hope Squad

  • Need: To reduce youth suicide rates in Utah.
  • Intervention: Hope Squad is a statewide program that trains youth to look after their classmates and refer those with suicidal thoughts or other mental health concerns to adult advisors.
  • Results: Surveys indicate that Hope Squad members increase and retain their knowledge of suicide and increase help-seeking behaviors after completing training.
Description
In 2014, Utah had the 5th highest rate of youth suicides in the country. Among children 10-17 years of age, suicide is the leading cause of death in the state. A 2015 JAMA Pediatrics study indicates that youth suicide rates in rural areas across the country are almost double those in urban areas.

*Read More

Suicide Rates on The Rise; Native Americans Significantly Affected!

The violent crime rate in the United States may be at a historic low, but another form of violence is growing. Suicide rates have been increasing since 2000 after decades of decline, as documented in a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

From 1999 to 2015, approximately 600,000 U.S. residents died by suicide, with 2015 being the deadliest year. And not all groups are suffering equally, as those in rural communities — especially white and Native Americans — are dealing with the highest suicide rates.

The CDC report, based on county-level mortality data between 2000 and 2015, reveals first a slow rising trend and then a noticeable spike around 2008. The researchers speculate that the financial crisis, which particularly devastated more rural communities, was a big part of the reason why, but other risks specific to rural areas include more poverty and social isolation, fewer mental health resources, and the prevalence of opioids.

Over this time, the CDC found that men are about four times likelier to commit suicide, and both Native Americans and whites are about two to three times more at risk than other groups. Children, also, are at about a third of the risk of adults. The suicide rate worsened in most categories by about 10 to 20 percent after 2008, with a lower rate of rise among black people, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and Latinos.

The report suggests policies intended to counter the increased suicide risk, especially in rural communities. Building up better mental health infrastructure outside cities is one possibility, so people could get help earlier and health care professionals have a better chance of identifying who most need help. Rural, predominately white, and native communities may face a few unique factors, particularly physical isolation and increased distance from health care resources. But many of the biggest drivers of the increased risk are more or less universal, including economic hardship and the proliferation of drugs like opioids. Figuring out some way to deal with those problems would likely go a long way toward reversing this tragic trend.

Mar 18, 2017 at 10:36 AM ET

Relying on Each Other: Yurok Tribe Responds to Youth Suicide Crisis

yurok-tribe-meeting

Take a look how the Yurok Tribe came together during hard times to make their community a better place to live.

Read the full article here: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/07/18/relying-each-other-yurok-tribe-responds-youth-suicide-crisis-165133

New Resource: Challenges and Recommendations for Evaluating Suicide Prevention Programs

suicideprevention

The report discusses specifically:

*         Measuring the Impact of Suicide Prevention Programs

*         Evaluation of Awareness and Communication Campaigns

*         Evaluation of Gatekeeper or Other Training Programs

*         Partnerships and Community Support

*         Evaluation of Cultural Adaptations/Tailoring of AI/AN Suicide Prevention

You can view the report at: http://www.sprc.org/library_resources/items/challenges-and-recommendations-evaluating-suicide-prevention-programs