2017 AIRA Meeting Call for Papers and Posters

The 2017 AIRA Meeting will take place FridaySaturday, and Sunday, October 20 – 21, 2017, with

Pre-Conference Workshops on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

 

The call for papers and posters is now open! Please see http://www.americanindigenousresearchassociation.org/annual-meeting/ for details. Abstracts are due to Lori Lambert (22leaningtree@gmail.com) no later than August 30.

Seeking Native American Languages Grant Reviewers

The Department of Education, Office of Indian Education is soliciting highly qualified individuals to assist in the review process for one discretionary grant competition for 2017. This includes: Native American Language Grants (NAL), https://https://www2.ed.gov/programs/nal/index.html. Electronic review is tentatively scheduled in early July, 2017. The purposes of the NAL@ED program are to: (1) Support schools that use Native American and Alaska Native languages as the primary language of instruction; (2) Maintain, protect, and promote the rights and freedom of Native Americans and Alaska Natives to use, practice, maintain, and revitalize their languages, as envisioned in the Native American Languages Act of 1990 (25 U.S.C. 2901 et seq.); and (3) Support the Nation’s First Peoples’ efforts to maintain and revitalize their languages and cultures, and to improve educational opportunities and student outcomes within Native American and Alaska Native communities. For Fiscal Year 2017 the program will be administered under Title VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended. Readers are eligible to apply if you have not read for three consecutive years. Field readers with advanced education degrees and/or experience working with American Indian and Alaska Native communities desired but not required. Degreed individuals who possess Native language instruction experience are encouraged to apply. Individuals selected as panel readers will need to commit to being available by telephone one or two hours per day for up to two weeks reading, scoring and paneling on assigned applications. Your resume will be reviewed for conflict of interest concerns. By June 30, 2017, please submit your resume, including a valid email address and phone number, to:John.Cheek@ed.gov.

 

Summer Reading!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

Resource: Food Atlas

USDA Food Access Research Atlas | view map

The Food Access Research Atlas presents a spatial overview of food access indicators for low-income and other census tracts using different measures of supermarket accessibility. Census-tract level data on food access can be downloaded or viewed in an interactive map.

USDA Food Environment Atlas | view map

Food environment factors—such as store/restaurant proximity, food prices, food and nutrition assistance programs, and community characteristics—interact to influence food choices and diet quality. Research has been documenting the complexity of these interactions, but more research is needed to identify causal relationships and effective policy interventions.

*Info from http://crcaih.org/news-and-events/554-resource-food-atlas

Suicide Rates on The Rise; Native Americans Significantly Affected!

The violent crime rate in the United States may be at a historic low, but another form of violence is growing. Suicide rates have been increasing since 2000 after decades of decline, as documented in a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

From 1999 to 2015, approximately 600,000 U.S. residents died by suicide, with 2015 being the deadliest year. And not all groups are suffering equally, as those in rural communities — especially white and Native Americans — are dealing with the highest suicide rates.

The CDC report, based on county-level mortality data between 2000 and 2015, reveals first a slow rising trend and then a noticeable spike around 2008. The researchers speculate that the financial crisis, which particularly devastated more rural communities, was a big part of the reason why, but other risks specific to rural areas include more poverty and social isolation, fewer mental health resources, and the prevalence of opioids.

Over this time, the CDC found that men are about four times likelier to commit suicide, and both Native Americans and whites are about two to three times more at risk than other groups. Children, also, are at about a third of the risk of adults. The suicide rate worsened in most categories by about 10 to 20 percent after 2008, with a lower rate of rise among black people, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and Latinos.

The report suggests policies intended to counter the increased suicide risk, especially in rural communities. Building up better mental health infrastructure outside cities is one possibility, so people could get help earlier and health care professionals have a better chance of identifying who most need help. Rural, predominately white, and native communities may face a few unique factors, particularly physical isolation and increased distance from health care resources. But many of the biggest drivers of the increased risk are more or less universal, including economic hardship and the proliferation of drugs like opioids. Figuring out some way to deal with those problems would likely go a long way toward reversing this tragic trend.

Mar 18, 2017 at 10:36 AM ET

Shakopee Tribe Donates $100,000 to “Reclaiming Native Truth”!

Longmont, Colorado (February 9, 2017) – The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) announced today a $100,000 donation to the Reclaiming Native Truth project that is co-managed by First Nations Development Institute and Echo Hawk Consulting, both based in Colorado. The gift is part of a package of new SMSC donations totaling more than $4 million for Native American causes in several states.

Reclaiming Native Truth is a groundbreaking project that will consolidate and build upon previous research efforts in order to create a long-term, Native-led movement that will positively transform the popular image of and narrative about Native Americans. From 2016-2018, the project team is working with an advisory committee of Native leaders, stakeholders, and racial equity experts and advocates to understand the underlying reasons for society’s negative and inaccurate perceptions of Native Americans. Based on this improved understanding, the project will have the tools necessary to build consensus around tackling this long-standing problem. It is expected that the project will lead to the creation of a national campaign to achieve greater awareness, respect and equality for Native peoples.

“Launching an unprecedented national project like Reclaiming Native Truth requires farsighted dedication from planners and funders. The SMSC’s donation shows a long-term commitment to improving the lives of Native Americans,” said Michael Roberts, co-director of Reclaiming Native Truth and president and CEO of First Nations Development Institute.

“There are so many needs across Indian Country, and this new financial support will go a long way toward improving the lives of many people, especially children and future generations,” said SMSC Chairman Charles R. Vig.

The SMSC has donated approximately $350 million to organizations and causes since 1992.

Today’s donation to the Reclaiming Native Truth project was made less than one month after making a $200,000 gift to fund living allowances for AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers working to improve Native nutrition, as part of the SMSC’s $5 million Seeds of Native Health campaign. It was the first time in VISTA’s history in which a tribe provided funding to deploy VISTA members nationally. In an editorial lauding the SMSC’s Seeds of Native Health campaign, the Star Tribune – Minnesota’s largest news outlet – called the tribe a “philanthropic force.”

Reclaiming Native Truth is co-directed by Crystal Echo Hawk, president and CEO of Echo Hawk Consulting.

Learn more about the Shakopee Tribe 

Quote: Mother Teresa

“Never worry about numbers. Help one person at a time, and always start with the person nearest you.” – Mother Teresa

New Funding Opportunity: Indigenous Project LAUNCH Due on 3/1/2017

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) is accepting applications for FY 2017 Linking Actions for Unmet Needs in Children’s Health in American Indian/Alaskan (AI/AN) Native Communities and U.S. Territories and Pacific Jurisdictions Cooperative Agreements (Short title:  Indigenous Project LAUNCH).

The purpose of this program is to promote the wellness of young children from birth to eight years within tribes, territories and Pacific Island jurisdictions by addressing the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and behavioral aspects of their development.

The goal of Project LAUNCH is for children to be thriving in safe, supportive environments, and entering school ready to learn and able to succeed.

Applications are due on March 1, 2017

Please share this announcement with your colleagues and tribal stakeholders. For more information, visit https://www.samhsa.gov/grants/grant-announcements/sm-17-004. Please send all questions to IndigenousLAUNCH@samhsa.hhs.gov.

Tribal Histories on Wisconsin Public Television

Wisconsin Public Television (WPT) will be premiering three additional programs as part of the Tribal Histories project. These programs will include tribal members sharing their nation’s oral traditions from following three tribal communities:

Red Cliff Ojibwe History, Marvin DeFoe and Andrew Gokee

Air Times: Thursday, December 15 (7:30 pm on WPT) and Friday, December 16 (1:30 am on WPT)

Air Times: Thursday, December 22 (7:30 pm on WPT) and Friday, December 23 (1:30 am on WPT)

Air Times: Thursday, December 29 (7:30 pm on WPT) and Friday, December 30 (1:30 am on WPT)

In August 2015, WPT premiered the next series of programming as part of the Tribal Histories project, which included the following three programs:

In August 2014, WPT premiered the first three programs as part of the Tribal Histories project, which included the following three programs:

Programs featuring the other sovereign American Indian nations and tribal communities located within state of Wisconsin will air on WPT in the next couple years.

WPT’s Tribal Histories project is part of American Indian Studies and Wisconsin Act 31 Initiative to provide educational resources for teaching and learning of Wisconsin’s American Indian nations and tribal communities.

Dr. Bowman goes Deep into the Social Justice Iceberg!

iceberg2AEA 2016 TIG Panel Session, Deep into the Social Justice Iceburg: How Evaluation Helps Design and Drive Whole-Systems Change (a live K-12 example)

 Chair/Discussant/Presenters:

    • Thomaz Kauark Chianca (Managing Partner – COMEA Relevant Evaluations)
    • Nicole R. Bowman (Mohican/Munsee, Research/Evaluation – Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, President – Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC)
    • Joanne McEachen (President & Chief Destiny Changer – The Learner First)
    • E Jane Davidson (President / Vice President – Real Evaluation / The Learner First)
    • Rodney K Hopson (George Mason University)
    • Ernest Robert House (Professor Emeritus – University of Colorado)
    • Sonya Horsford
    • Jacqueline Sakho

 Friday, October 28, 2016 | 1:45 pm – 3:15 pm EST | Room: Atrium Ballroom A

Session Information

From the session abstract: “Deep, lasting change for social justice can only happen when it goes right into the depths of the systems culture iceberg. That means changing not just policies, programs, and structures, but also ‘the way we really do things around here’. At the deepest level of all, it requires shattering dysfunctional beliefs and assumptions and embedding new ones. In this session, you will see a compelling live example of deep systemic change that is powered by social justice-driven evaluative thinking, design, methodologies and tools.”

Conference website

Conference agenda

Conference registration