NIH STEP-UP 11th & 12th Grade High School Portal Open

 

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK)

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

2017 American Indian/Alaska Native High School
NIH/NIDDK STEP-UP Cohort
The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held in Washington, D.C.
  • Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or permanent legal resident of U.S.- affiliated territory
  • High school junior or senior (at the time of application)
  • Must meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Part of an underrepresented racial or ethnic group (American Indian/Alaska Native).
    • Disadvantage as defined by annual family income
    • First generation in family to attend college
    • Diagnosed with a disability limiting one or more major life activities

Principal Investigator: Dr. Carolee Dodge-Francis
Emailcarolee.dodge-francis@unlv.edu
American Indian Research & Education Center (AIREC)

Apply at: http://stepup.niddk.nih.gov/Register.aspx
(If you are a new participant register as a new user and don’t forget to store your email/username and passcode, you will need later if you are a returning, second year use last years’ information)
Apply October 15, 2017 through February 15, 2018
Apply Now

 

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

CREA 2017 Schedule and Early Registration

Early Registration Deadline August 25, 2017!!!

https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017

CREA 2017 4th International Conference

September 27-29, 2017

Update

We are delighted to provide you with this preview of the detailed CREA 2017 conference schedule at: https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/conference-schedule.

As previously noted there will be keynote and plenary addresses by our internationally recognized scholars that include Drs. Gloria Ladson-Billings (University of Wisconsin-Madison),  Ernest House (Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado-Boulder), Teresa LaFromboise (Stanford University), Robin Miller (Michigan State University, and Guillermo Solano-Flores (Stanford University) (https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/keynote-speakers). Additionally, six pre-conference workshops (September 26) on major topics in culturally responsive evaluation and assessment will be provided by a stellar group of scholars and practitioners (https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops).

Finally, we are anxiously looking forward to the American Evaluation Association’s live and webcast Dialogue on Race and Class that will be held on September 28 at the conference with panelists: Joan LaFrance, Owner of Mekinak Consulting and enrolled Citizen of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa, Belcourt North Dakota; Amanda Lewis, Professor of African American Studies at the University of Illinois, Chicago; Alden Loury, Director of Research and Evaluation, Metropolitan Planning Commission; Robin Lin Miller, Professor of Ecological – Community Psychology at Michigan State University; Susan Smith Richardson, Editor and Publisher, The Chicago Reporter; and Susana Vasquez, Vice President of Strategic Partnerships; https://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/aea-race-and-class-dialogue

Abbreviated list of confirmed conference program participants:

James D. Anderson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sharon Nelson Barber, WestEd

Katrina Bledsoe, EDC (Education Development Center)

Peggy Carr, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Henry Frierson, University of Florida

Leslie Goodyear EDC (Education Development Center)

Edmund W. Gordon, (Prof. Emeritus), Yale University and Teachers College, Columbia University

Drew Gitomer, Rutgers University

Jennifer Greene, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Melvin Hall, Northern Arizona University

Rodney Hopson, George Mason University

Karen Kirkhart, Syracuse University

Donna Mertens, (Prof. Emeritus), Gallaudet University

Kathryn Newcomer, George Washington University

Joe O’Hara, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland

Lynda Pura-Watson Education Review Office, Wellington New Zealand

Claudia Rankins, National Science Foundation

Katherine Ryan, (Prof. Emeritus) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Hazel Symonette, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Katherine Tibbetts, Liliʻuokalani Trust (Honolulu HI)

An Artful August

August is full of opportunities to support our local solo artists and artist communities. Find the nearest art show or festival and bring the whole family for art exhibits, demonstrations, fun runs and even live art performances!

August 25th-27th

2017 AIRA Meeting Call for Papers and Posters

The 2017 AIRA Meeting will take place FridaySaturday, and Sunday, October 20 – 21, 2017, with

Pre-Conference Workshops on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

 

The call for papers and posters is now open! Please see http://www.americanindigenousresearchassociation.org/annual-meeting/ for details. Abstracts are due to Lori Lambert (22leaningtree@gmail.com) no later than August 30.

Seeking Native American Languages Grant Reviewers

The Department of Education, Office of Indian Education is soliciting highly qualified individuals to assist in the review process for one discretionary grant competition for 2017. This includes: Native American Language Grants (NAL), https://https://www2.ed.gov/programs/nal/index.html. Electronic review is tentatively scheduled in early July, 2017. The purposes of the NAL@ED program are to: (1) Support schools that use Native American and Alaska Native languages as the primary language of instruction; (2) Maintain, protect, and promote the rights and freedom of Native Americans and Alaska Natives to use, practice, maintain, and revitalize their languages, as envisioned in the Native American Languages Act of 1990 (25 U.S.C. 2901 et seq.); and (3) Support the Nation’s First Peoples’ efforts to maintain and revitalize their languages and cultures, and to improve educational opportunities and student outcomes within Native American and Alaska Native communities. For Fiscal Year 2017 the program will be administered under Title VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended. Readers are eligible to apply if you have not read for three consecutive years. Field readers with advanced education degrees and/or experience working with American Indian and Alaska Native communities desired but not required. Degreed individuals who possess Native language instruction experience are encouraged to apply. Individuals selected as panel readers will need to commit to being available by telephone one or two hours per day for up to two weeks reading, scoring and paneling on assigned applications. Your resume will be reviewed for conflict of interest concerns. By June 30, 2017, please submit your resume, including a valid email address and phone number, to:John.Cheek@ed.gov.

 

Summer Reading!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

Resource: Food Atlas

USDA Food Access Research Atlas | view map

The Food Access Research Atlas presents a spatial overview of food access indicators for low-income and other census tracts using different measures of supermarket accessibility. Census-tract level data on food access can be downloaded or viewed in an interactive map.

USDA Food Environment Atlas | view map

Food environment factors—such as store/restaurant proximity, food prices, food and nutrition assistance programs, and community characteristics—interact to influence food choices and diet quality. Research has been documenting the complexity of these interactions, but more research is needed to identify causal relationships and effective policy interventions.

*Info from http://crcaih.org/news-and-events/554-resource-food-atlas

Suicide Rates on The Rise; Native Americans Significantly Affected!

The violent crime rate in the United States may be at a historic low, but another form of violence is growing. Suicide rates have been increasing since 2000 after decades of decline, as documented in a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

From 1999 to 2015, approximately 600,000 U.S. residents died by suicide, with 2015 being the deadliest year. And not all groups are suffering equally, as those in rural communities — especially white and Native Americans — are dealing with the highest suicide rates.

The CDC report, based on county-level mortality data between 2000 and 2015, reveals first a slow rising trend and then a noticeable spike around 2008. The researchers speculate that the financial crisis, which particularly devastated more rural communities, was a big part of the reason why, but other risks specific to rural areas include more poverty and social isolation, fewer mental health resources, and the prevalence of opioids.

Over this time, the CDC found that men are about four times likelier to commit suicide, and both Native Americans and whites are about two to three times more at risk than other groups. Children, also, are at about a third of the risk of adults. The suicide rate worsened in most categories by about 10 to 20 percent after 2008, with a lower rate of rise among black people, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and Latinos.

The report suggests policies intended to counter the increased suicide risk, especially in rural communities. Building up better mental health infrastructure outside cities is one possibility, so people could get help earlier and health care professionals have a better chance of identifying who most need help. Rural, predominately white, and native communities may face a few unique factors, particularly physical isolation and increased distance from health care resources. But many of the biggest drivers of the increased risk are more or less universal, including economic hardship and the proliferation of drugs like opioids. Figuring out some way to deal with those problems would likely go a long way toward reversing this tragic trend.

Mar 18, 2017 at 10:36 AM ET

Shakopee Tribe Donates $100,000 to “Reclaiming Native Truth”!

Longmont, Colorado (February 9, 2017) – The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) announced today a $100,000 donation to the Reclaiming Native Truth project that is co-managed by First Nations Development Institute and Echo Hawk Consulting, both based in Colorado. The gift is part of a package of new SMSC donations totaling more than $4 million for Native American causes in several states.

Reclaiming Native Truth is a groundbreaking project that will consolidate and build upon previous research efforts in order to create a long-term, Native-led movement that will positively transform the popular image of and narrative about Native Americans. From 2016-2018, the project team is working with an advisory committee of Native leaders, stakeholders, and racial equity experts and advocates to understand the underlying reasons for society’s negative and inaccurate perceptions of Native Americans. Based on this improved understanding, the project will have the tools necessary to build consensus around tackling this long-standing problem. It is expected that the project will lead to the creation of a national campaign to achieve greater awareness, respect and equality for Native peoples.

“Launching an unprecedented national project like Reclaiming Native Truth requires farsighted dedication from planners and funders. The SMSC’s donation shows a long-term commitment to improving the lives of Native Americans,” said Michael Roberts, co-director of Reclaiming Native Truth and president and CEO of First Nations Development Institute.

“There are so many needs across Indian Country, and this new financial support will go a long way toward improving the lives of many people, especially children and future generations,” said SMSC Chairman Charles R. Vig.

The SMSC has donated approximately $350 million to organizations and causes since 1992.

Today’s donation to the Reclaiming Native Truth project was made less than one month after making a $200,000 gift to fund living allowances for AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers working to improve Native nutrition, as part of the SMSC’s $5 million Seeds of Native Health campaign. It was the first time in VISTA’s history in which a tribe provided funding to deploy VISTA members nationally. In an editorial lauding the SMSC’s Seeds of Native Health campaign, the Star Tribune – Minnesota’s largest news outlet – called the tribe a “philanthropic force.”

Reclaiming Native Truth is co-directed by Crystal Echo Hawk, president and CEO of Echo Hawk Consulting.

Learn more about the Shakopee Tribe