Q & A Session with Honoring Nations

Are you thinking of applying to the 2018 Honoring Nations award in good governance?  Do you have questions about eligibility, the application process, or the criteria?  If so, please join us for a Q & A session and let us answer your questions! Participation is not mandatory; however applicants are encouraged to participate.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 at 4pm EST
The toll-free call in number: 1-866-889-3913
The Conference Passcode: HN18

The Harvard Project’s Honoring Nations program invites applications from American Indian governments across a broad range of subject areas including:

  • Cultural Affairs
  • Economic and Community Development
  • Education
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Government Performance
  • Health and Social Services
  • Intergovernmental Relations
  • Justice

The 2018 Honoring Nations awardees will receive a monetary grant to share their stories of success: $2000 for honors and $5000 for high honors.  Awardees will also be featured in case profiles, nation-building curriculum, Google platforms, and through world-class exhibits showcased at the Smithsonian Institution.

At the heart of Honoring Nations is the principle that tribes themselves hold the key to positive social, political, cultural, and economic prosperity—and that self-governance plays a crucial role in building and sustaining strong, healthy Indian nations.  Honored programs give decision-makers fresh ideas about how to create sustainable economies, improve service delivery, protect and manage vital resources, administer justice, and educate tribal citizens.

Applications are due January 24, 2018 For additional information about this program, please contact:

SIGN UP

Free Webinar: USDA National Organic Program

FREE WEBINAR!

USDA National Organic Program: Is Organic an Option for Me?
Thursday, December 7, 2017
11 a.m. Pacific / Noon Mountain / 1 p.m. Central / 2 p.m Eastern

Join the USDA National Organic Program staff as they share information about the USDA organic regulations, what the organic label means, and how to become USDA Certified Organic. Learn about the wide variety of USDA resources available to farmers, ranchers and other businesses looking to join the organic sector.

Topics include:

  • Origin of the U.S. Organic Sector
  • What is Organic?
  • National Organic Program
  • The Organic Community
  • Organic Agriculture — The Basics
  • Understanding the Organic Label
  • Role of Certifiers
  • Getting Certified
  • Market Overview
  • USDA Resources

Presenter:

Vanessa Garcia Polanco, USDA National Organic Program

2018 NEA ESP Conference

March 23-25, 2018



Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista
1751 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
(407) 827-4000

General Registration Information

CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION

The NEA ESP conference is the premier professional development opportunity for Education Support Professionals across the nation. The goal of this conference is to enhance the skills and knowledge of ESP members to positively impact student achievement, build community relations, organize members, advocate for educators, build stronger locals, and help our members do their jobs better. The conference offers more than 60 different hands-on workshops over the course of four days. Pre-Conference workshop opportunities are offered in topics ranging from social justice, early career educators, leadership development, team building and school climate.

See the 2017 program…

How To Register

Online Registration

  • Online registration for the 2018 NEA ESP Conference is now open. Click the Register Now icon above and reserve your space today!

On-site Registration

  • On-site registration will be made available for all participants until full capacity is reached.
  • Personal checks will NOT be accepted on-site.
  • Pre-conference workshops are on a first-come, first-served basis. Some pre-conference workshops may be filled to capacity at the time of on-site registration and will not be available.

Terms

  • Registration is accepted on a full-payment, first-come, first-served basis only.
  • Personal checks will not be accepted as a form of payment.

Registration Fees and Refunds

NEA ESP Conference registration fees are as follows:

NEA Member Pre-Conference Participant Registrants (Thursday-Sunday): $250

  • Includes breakfast and lunch during pre-conference session days
  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, awards dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Non-Member Pre-Conference Participant Registrants (Thursday-Sunday): $350

  • Includes breakfast and lunch during pre-conference session days
  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, dinner and entertainment on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

NEA Member Conference Participant Registrants (Friday-Sunday): $200

  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, dinner and entertainment on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Non-member Conference Participant Registrants (Friday-Sunday): $300

  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, awards dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Exhibitor Opportunities: $700

  • Includes booth space from Thursday – Saturday of the conference, all provided conference meals for one person each day.
  • Registration for all exhibitor opportunities are available through online conference registration.
  • Online registration for the 2018 NEA ESP Conference will open in the fall.
  • Sponsorship opportunities are also available. Click here for more information.

NOTE: Online registration will open in the fall. Personal checks will not be accepted as a form of payment.

As a reminder, pre-conference spots are reserved on a first-come, first-served basis. Don’t miss reserving your spot!

Refunds

The deadline to request a 100 percent refund of registration fees is two weeks after online registration closes. Registrants will be eligible to receive a 50 percent refund during the third week after online registration closes. Thereafter, conference registration will be non-refundable.

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Registration Confirmation

CVent, NEA’s online conference registration system, will automatically generate a confirmation number upon completion of your registration. This confirmation number can be found in your confirmation email once you have submitted your registration, as well as in the confirmation page that will appear immediately after submitting your registration. Confirmation numbers are required to make future changes to registration accounts. Please be sure to keep this confirmation number for your records.

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First Timers Session

The NEA ESP Quality Department in the Center for Great Public Schools welcomes all of our first timer registrants to the NEA ESP Conference! We are confident that our programs will include great professional development sessions for you to add to your PD tool box. The NEA ESP Conference provides first timers with a special First Timers Lunch Session, held during on Friday afternoon of each conference weekend. This session is designed to acclimate first time attendees with both the NEA structure, conference structure and networking opportunities. Pre-registration is required once conference registration opens.

Lost, have questions, need one-on-one direction? Visit the conference registration desk. We are happy to assist you!

Hotel Lodging and Transportation

Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista
1751 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
(407) 827-4000

ROOM RATES

To receive the conference rate of $174 per night ($195.75 with tax included), reference the 2018 NEA ESP Conference when making hotel reservations over the phone. Reservations can also be made online by visiting, https://aws.passkey.com/go/2018NEAESPConference.

NOTE: Attendees fully funded by NEA to attend the conference should NOT make their own hotel reservations. Fully funded attendees will be added to the NEA hotel direct bill list via the internal conference registration process. NEA will not reimburse fully funded attendees for independently reserved hotel rooms.

AIRPORT TAXI AND SHUTTLE SERVICES

In an effort to reduce transportation costs, we encourage participants to reserve shuttle services ahead of time or to make arrangements to carpool with colleagues to and from the airport for all conference locations.

Questions or Comments

  • Questions or comments regarding ESP Conference registration should be addressed to Lisa Connor.
  • Questions or comments regarding conference ESP of the Year nominees and state selected Leadership nominees should be directed to Lisa Connor.
  • Inquiries regarding exhibiting at the ESP Conference should be directed to Jessica Brinkley.

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Now Available

2018 Pre-Conference Session Descriptions ( PDF, 3 pgs.)

For Reference

2017 ESP Conference Program  ( PDF, 51 pgs.)

*Join the new NEA ESP Conference online community through NEA edCommunities and become a member of the ESP Conference Group! This group will house real-time conference information, pictures, discussion areas for participants, and more!

*Info from http://www.nea.org/grants/31430.htm

Poster: American Indian Perspectives on Thanksgiving

*Click to view the PDF by the National Museum of the American Indian.

Each November educators across the country teach their
students about the First Thanksgiving, a quintessentially
American holiday. They try to give students an accurate
picture of what happened in Plymouth in 1621 and explain how
that event fits into American history. Unfortunately, many teaching
materials give an incomplete, if not inaccurate, portrayal of the first
Thanksgiving, particularly of the event’s Native American
participants.

IPE TIG Week: Introduction to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG by Erica Roberts and Nicole Bowman

Erica Roberts

Hello and welcome to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG Week (November 19-24)! I am Erica Blue Roberts, a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, IPE TIG Program Chair, and AEA GEDI alumnus. And I’m Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape) the IPE TIG Chair. As we approach the Colonial celebration and Federal holiday of Thanksgiving, let us reflect on, redefine our understandings, and redirect our behaviors regarding the Original inhabitants of Turtle Island (North America) and Kukuna Auhy (Mother Earth). Together we can move from cultural appropriation and romanticized notions of the first Thanksgiving, to a cultural appreciation for the ongoing contributions by Indigenous people that isn’t limited by a holiday or season.

The IPE TIG was established in 2006 to give voice and recognition to the Indigenous members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and begin to infuse Indigenous evaluation practices into more mainstream evaluation. Indigenous evaluation approaches were developed as culturally-responsive ways of evaluating programs in Indigenous communities. Indigenous evaluation often values and incorporates Indigenous knowledge, recognizes the negative history of evaluation imposed on many Indigenous communities, and respects tribal and data sovereignty. For more information about Indigenous evaluation, look to the work of IPE TIG Founder – Joan France, IPE TIG Founder – Fiona Cram, IPE TIG Chair – Nicky Bowman, and IPE TIG Program Chair – Erica Roberts.

The IPE TIG strives to achieve the following goals to improve evaluation practices and methods:

  • Developing and disseminating knowledge that helps assure that evaluations in which Indigenous people are among the major stakeholders are culturally responsive and respectful of their interests and rights.
  • Creating a venue for Indigenous evaluators and others working in Indigenous contexts to participate in discourse about evaluation models and methods that support Indigenous values, practices, and ways of knowing.
  • Mentoring and emerging evaluators interested in evaluation in various Indigenous contexts.

This week you will get a chance to read about a variety of Indigenous evaluation topics from the TIG Leadership and its members. We chose to blog this week as it is the week of the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when many misconceptions about American Indians and Alaska Natives are shared. We hope that by providing you with an overview of Indigenous evaluation, you may be inspired to look into other ways that Indigenous knowledge can be integrated into mainstream practices and understandings.

Rad Resources:

To learn more about the IPE TIG, please visit our website., become a member, and check us out on Facebook and Twitter.

No More Pranks-Giving:  How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee) Native Appropriations website and blog is an interactive forum for discussing representations and contributions of Native peoples.

Rethinking Schools Blog Archives on “Rethinking Thanksgiving:  Myths and Misgivings

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG week. All posts this week are contributed by members of the IPE Topical Interest Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

*Info originally posted: http://aea365.org/blog/ipe-tig-week-introduction-to-the-indigenous-peoples-in-evaluation-tig-by-erica-roberts-and-nicole-bowman/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+aea365+%28AEA365%29

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEMBER 1, 2017

CONTACT:

Brian Jackson

President

Wisconsin Indian Education Association

Office: (715) 588-3800

Email: brian.jackson@ldfschool.org

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November

Organization issues open Call-to-Action to strengthen relations, address disparities faced by American Indians and ending the use of race based mascots.

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is proud to celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November. On August 3, 1990, President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. The Bill reads in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities.” Every year since, the Office of the President has issued a proclamation supporting the month as such. The landmark Bill honors America’s indigenous people.

In keeping with the essence of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association honors the unique culture, history and perseverance of the 11 federally recognized tribal nations within the state, as well as all Native nations across both North and South America.

WIEA President Brian Jackson says the organization is calling on tribal, state and local governments, public and private schools, tribal education programs and departments and civic groups alike to implement curriculum that strengthen educational offerings about Indigenous peoples in Wisconsin.

“For hundreds of years, American Indian history has been obscured, altered and in many instances erased from existence,” said Jackson. “It has long been a mission of WIEA to educate our non-Indian neighbors to the valuable contributions of Native Americans over the course of American history — many of which have allowed this country to attain a level of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by so many,” added Jackson.

As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is issuing a call to action to address three main areas in closing the cultural divide while increasing the socioeconomic, educational and political position of Wisconsin’s tribal nations:

  • An open challenge to local governments, schools, civic organizations and individuals to learn more about the historical and contemporary connections of your local community to neighboring tribes and tribal communities in general.
  • Request that school districts employing race-based mascots develop an exit strategy away from the use of American Indian or other race based imagery within one (1) year. This request is especially critical if a school within the district you reside or a school within your school’s athletic conference currently uses a race based mascot.
  • Contact your legislator(s) to request a repeal of the 2013 Wisconsin Act 115, which makes it nearly impossible for those who object to race-based mascots and sports team names to bring about change at their school district.

Over the nearly 25-year history of WIEA, the group has remained a catalyst in the effort to incorporate historically accurate Native American curriculum into Wisconsin public schools. The effort gained support when former Governor Jim Doyle (D) signed into law Wisconsin Act 31, which requires public schools to offer historically accurate instruction on American Indian tribes in the state. Act 31 was born as a result of the ugly and sometimes violent protests of the late 80s and early 90s organized by non-Indian groups opposed to Chippewa Treaty Rights. Ultimately, District Judge Barbara Crabb ruled in favor of tribal spearers who sought a permanent injunction prohibiting non-Indian protesters from interfering with their court affirmed Treaty Rights, finding the protests to be racially motivated.

In addition to the call-to-action initiatives, WIEA will participate in a National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots, which is scheduled for Friday, November 17, 2017. Tribes, communities, universities and groups across the country plan to hold local and national events. From documentaries and movie showings, to book readings and workshops, and cultural events, the National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots brings to the forefront the social issues caused by Indian and other race based mascots.

“We’re encouraging everyone to participate in American Indian Heritage Month along with the November 17th National Day-of-Action on Raced Based Mascots,” said Jackson. “We all have a responsibility to add to the quality of life in our respective communities. When we act in the spirit of cooperation and unity, we create the framework for a positive future for people of all races and cultures in Wisconsin and beyond.”

Jackson says that WIEA, along with the Indian Mascot and Logo Task Force, offer a host of educational resources that provide historically accurate, authentic information on Wisconsin’s Native nations. “Much of the general public’s views and misconceptions of American Indians is due to the lack of meaningful information,” said Jackson. “WIEA is open to partnering to provide materials, training, resources and information to any group or organization interesting in broadening their knowledge base on American Indians – that also includes widening their network and fostering positive relationships,” Jackson added.

The American Indian Heritage or Native American Heritage Month designation aims to provide a platform for Native people in the United States to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance and ways and concepts of life. This gives Native people and their allies the opportunity to express to their community, city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and cooperation in their local area.

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For additional resources visit any one of the following websites:

www.indianmascots.com

www.wiea.org

www.wisconsinact31.org

www.dpi.wi.gov/amind/state-statues

About the Wisconsin Indian Education Association

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian Educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council (GLITC) Education sub-committee.

The GLITC Education Committee began in the early 1970’s but was disbanded around 1983 because of a lack of funds.

A group of concerned Indian Educators began meeting in 1984 and after a series of meetings during that year, developed By-laws and a mission statement.

The group was formally organized in 1985 as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

The Association has seven regions throughout the State. Each region elects/appoints two representatives as WIEA Board members for a two-year term.

Each Region’s Board members are responsible for hosting a meeting in their region throughout the year to share and gather information for the Board to either act upon or disseminate to all other WIEA members.

The Board meets every month except December. Meetings are held in the various regions throughout the state in an effort to get input from the general membership regarding their issues and concerns.

New Resources Available for Grantseekers

New Resources Available for Fundraisers & Grantseekers

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) is delighted to share new resources for grantseekers in order to help your organization in its sustainability efforts. You will find these resources on our website under the Grantseeker Resources section. This webpage includes webinars and other materials providing general tips regarding applying for and researching various funding opportunities, along with information on evaluation and First Nations’ own grantmaking process. It includes resources helpful to both nonprofits and tribal government programs.

In particular, today we are pleased to offer two new pre-recorded (on-demand) webinars that will be helpful to you and your communities as you create new initiatives and develop current programs to fulfill your missions. Please feel free to share this information with others. These webinars were developed based on feedback from grantees and applicants. Note: You’ll just need to add your email address and name to view either of these free webinars.

These webinars were made possible with the generous support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Catalyzing Community Giving Initiative, the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the Native Arts Initiative: A Project of First Nations Development Institute.

You can also find these and other various webinars on the First Nations Knowledge webinar page at www.firstnations.org/fnk, and then click on any of the links to “Previous Webinars.”

 

MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference: RFP!

Rita S. Fierro, PhD from Fierro Consulting has agreed to give the Keynote Address at the MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference on May 10, 2018. The conference theme is Enhancing Evaluation Through Effective Communication and Interaction. The conference is accepting proposals for presentations and posters at this time. Go to maeeval.org for more information about Dr. Fierro’s keynote and links to the application forms.

*The deadline for proposals is Monday, January 22, 2018.

Dr. Bowman’s AEA Presentation Available Online Now!

Dr. Nicole Bowman presented, “Looking Backward but Moving Forward: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Indigenous Evaluation. at American Evaluation Associations, Evaluation 2017 conference.

*View Dr. Bowman’s slides online.

Presentation Abstract:

Culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) and culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation (CRIE) within the broader field of evaluation specialized designs is not often included in western literature nor known or used by the majority of mainstream evaluators.  In order to address this literature and practice gap, this article offers an origin story of CRIE prior to Colonial or European contact in the United States and gives a historical, theoretical, and practical foundation for conducting CRIE in a contemporary context.  Examples of evidence-based models and resources connect CRIE to western designs and provide concrete strategies for the field of evaluation going forward.  The article provides a new evaluation research, policy and practice for the field of evaluation to consider so that when working with Indigenous populations and Tribal governments a more culturally and contextually responsive, scientifically rigorous, and ethical evaluation can be conducted.

About AEA

The American Evaluation Association is a professional association of evaluators devoted to the application and exploration of program evaluation, personnel evaluation, technology, and many other forms of evaluation. Evaluation involves assessing the strengths and weaknesses of programs, policies, personnel, products, and organizations to improve their effectiveness. AEA has approximately 7300 members representing all 50 states in the United States as well as over 80 foreign countries.

The American Evaluation Association seeks to act in ways that embody our mission, vision, and values in pursuit of our defined policies and goals.

MISSION: The American Evaluation Association’s mission is to improve evaluation practices and methods, increase evaluation use, promote evaluation as a profession, and support the contribution of evaluation to the generation of theory and knowledge about effective human action.

VISION: The American Evaluation Association’s vision is to foster an inclusive, diverse, and international community of practice positioned as a respected source of information for and about the field of evaluation.

VALUES: The American Evaluation Association values excellence in evaluation practice, utilization of evaluation findings, and inclusion and diversity in the evaluation community.

i. We value high quality, ethically defensible, culturally responsive evaluation practices that lead to effective and humane organizations and ultimately to the enhancement of the public good.

ii. We value high quality, ethically defensible, culturally responsive evaluation practices that contribute to decision-making processes, program improvement, and policy formulation.

iii. We value a global and international evaluation community and understanding of evaluation practices.

iv. We value the continual development of evaluation professionals and the development of evaluators from under-represented groups.

v. We value inclusiveness and diversity, welcoming members at any point in their career, from any context, and representing a range of thought and approaches.

vi. We value efficient, effective, responsive, transparent, and socially responsible association operations.

Organization: AEA is led by a Board, advised by Task Forces and Working Groups, structured around Topical Interest Groups (TIGs), and aligned with recognized regional affiliate associations.  Learn more

Bylaws: The Bylaws of the American Evaluation Association serve as the legal foundation for Association operations.  Learn more

Awards: AEA’s awards program acknowledges outstanding contributions and service to the field of evaluation.  Learn more

Contacts: We welcome your inquiries about the association, membership, our annual conference, programs, or services. Please do not hesitate to contact the AEA office at any time.  Learn more

Faculty Position in Indigenous Community Studies

Open Rank faculty position in Indigenous Community Studies University of
Wisconsin-Madison The Department of Civil Society and Community Studies
(School of Human Ecology) and the American Indian Studies Program (College
of Letters and Science) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison invite
applications for a tenure-track faculty position, open to all ranks in
Indigenous Community Studies.

Position Summary:
This position is for a joint appointment with 50% in the Department of Civil
Society and Community Studies (tenure home) and 50% in the American Indian
Studies Program. We seek a candidate with expertise in community-engaged
scholarship, indigenous methodologies/evaluation, community leadership,
civil society or nonprofits and with tribal expertise. The area of research
is open and may include community/tribal health, environmental health,
community/tribal nutrition, indigenous knowledge systems, traditional
ecological knowledge, community/tribal education, social justice,
incarceration, etc. The candidate’s research should focus on Indigenous
peoples and issues within North America with a particular focus on Wisconsin
communities. The position requires scholarship, teaching, and service in a
department and a program serving undergraduate and graduate students. Other
desirable attributes include strong research methods, oral and written
communication skills and the ability to interact with an interdisciplinary
and collaborative intellectual community. Native American and minority
candidates are encouraged to apply.
Degree and area of specialization:
Holds a doctoral degree in a discipline relevant to the units and position
e.g. psychology, human development and family studies, social work, American
Indian studies, anthropology, education or related disciplines. Employment
contingent upon completion of degree.

The successful candidate will:
– Build community-academic partnerships with tribal/urban Indian communities
especially in Wisconsin.
– Maintain a coherent and productive program of research excellence.
– Seek and secure funding to support research partnerships.
– Teach graduate and undergraduate courses (2:2 load) and contribute to
program development.
– Supervise student research and provide high quality academic mentoring.
– Participate in shared governance and other departmental and university
service activities as appropriate for career stage.

Application link:
http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/496371/asst-assoc-or-full-professor-of-
indigenous-community-studies