The latest news from the NCAI Policy Research Center!

*The following is a newsletter from NCAI.

Greetings to our partners! We hope this brief newsletter finds you in a good way. At the Policy Research Center, we are eager to drive data to policy. We hope to serve as a resource to tribal leaders and communities – connecting our partners with the most cutting-edge research and providing a forum for decision-making. To learn more about our ongoing work:
Tribal Leader/Scholar Forum presentations are now LIVE!
Miss the Tribal Leader/Scholar Forum in Uncasville, CT? Not a problem! You can download agendas and PDFs of the presentations on our website. Click the link below to be directed to our online archive!
We need your input!

We have a new team at the Policy Research Center and we would love your input on how we can best fulfill our mission! Please take 3 minutes to complete our evaluation!

Link to PRC Input Form

Download our latest Research Update!
Each quarter, we release a Research Update to keep our partners informed of our work and the latest trends in research.
In this issue, we review our newest publications, including a one-pager on how tribal communities can respond to the growing opioid epidemic. We also highlight the latest research on food security, college retention, infant breastfeeding, etc. among tribal peoples and communities.

Last but not least, we share new data resources, upcoming scholar forums, and funding opportunities!

Download our Research Update

Time to enact Tribal Research Laws & Protocols!
The Policy Research advises tribes to review their current research laws, or consider the development of new ones, in light of recent revisions to two major federal research policies, the Common Rule and NIH single IRB policy. This is an opportunity to advance sovereignty over research on tribal lands and with tribal citizens.
We developed a resource to clarify what these research policy revisions mean for your community:
NCAI Policy Research Center
1516 P Street NW
Washington, DC 20005
www.ncai.org/prc

Save the Date | April 16-18, 2018 | Population Health Research Summit

2017 AIRA Meeting Call for Papers and Posters

The 2017 AIRA Meeting will take place FridaySaturday, and Sunday, October 20 – 21, 2017, with

Pre-Conference Workshops on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

 

The call for papers and posters is now open! Please see http://www.americanindigenousresearchassociation.org/annual-meeting/ for details. Abstracts are due to Lori Lambert (22leaningtree@gmail.com) no later than August 30.

Friday Funny! Koalas!

I enjoy Koalatative Research! BPC provides research services! Find out more!

*meme from iwastesomuchtime.com

Dr. Bowman Contributes to Population Guidelines for Native American Populations

Dr. Nicole Bowman contributed to Population Guidelines for Native American Populations (CA Reducing Disparities project). The report was submitted to the CA Office of Health Equity.

*Download the PDF of the report

Measuring the Achievement and Experiences of American Indian and Alaska Native Youth: National Indian Education Study 2015

In order to measure the progress of education in the United States, it is important to examine equity and growth for students from many different demographic groups. The educational experiences of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth are of particular interest to educators and policymakers because of the prevalence of academic risk factors for this group. For example, the percentage of students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2013-14 was highest for AI/AN students,[1] and in 2013 a higher percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native 8th-grade students than of Hispanic, White, or Asian 8th-grade students were absent more than 10 days in the last month.[2]

Although NCES attempts to collect data from AI/AN students in all of our surveys, disaggregated data for this group are sometimes not reportable due to their relatively small population size. Therefore, data collections that specifically target this group of students can be particularly valuable in ensuring the educational research and policy community has the information they need. The National Indian Education Survey is one of the primary resources for data on AI/AN youth.

The National Indian Education Study (NIES) is administered as part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) to allow more in-depth reporting on the achievement and experiences of AI/AN students in grade 4 and 8. NIES provides data at the national level and for select states with relatively high percentages of American Indians and/or Alaska Natives.[3] It also provides data by the concentration of AI/AN students attending schools in three mutually exclusive categories: Low density public schools (less than 25 percent AI/AN);[4] High density public schools (more than 25 percent AI/AN);[5] and Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools.[6]

In a recently released report on the results of the 2015 NIES, differences in performance on the reading and mathematics assessments emerged across school type. In 2015, students in low density public schools had higher scores in both subjects than those in high density public or BIE schools, and scores for students in high density public schools were higher than for those in BIE schools. Additionally, there were some score differences over time. For example, at grade 8, average reading scores in 2015 for students in BIE schools were higher than scores in 2009 and 2007, but were not significantly different from scores in 2011 and 2005 (Figure 2).

The characteristics of students attending low density, high density, and BIE schools differed at both grades. For example, BIE schools had a significantly higher percentage of students who were English language learners (ELL) and eligible for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Additionally, high density schools had a significantly higher percentage of ELL students and NSLP-eligible students than low density schools.

The report also explored to what extent AI/AN culture and language are part of the school curricula. AI/AN students in grades 4 and 8 reported that family members taught them the most about Native traditions. Differences by school type and density were observed in responses to other questions about the knowledge AI/AN students had of their family’s Native culture, the role AI/AN languages played in their lives, and their involvement in Native cultural ceremonies and gatherings in the community. For example, 28 percent of 4th-grade students in BIE schools reported they knew “a lot” about the history, traditions, or arts and crafts of their tribe compared to 22 percent of their AI/AN peers in high density schools, and 18 percent of those in low density schools. Similarly, 52 percent of 8th-grade students at BIE schools participated several times a year in ceremonies and gatherings of their AI/AN tribe or group, compared to 28 percent of their peers at high density public schools, and 20 percent of their peers at low density public schools.

If you’re interested in learning more about NIES, including what the study means for American Indian and Alaska Native students and communities, you can view the video below. Access the compete report and find out more about the study here: https://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nies/


Research Grant Opportunity: William T Grant Foundation

The William T Grant Foundation funds research that increases understanding in the following areas: 1) programs, policies and practices that reduce inequality in youth outcomes, and 2) strategies to improve the use of research evidence in ways that benefit youth. Research grants about reducing inequality typically range between $100,000 and $600,000 and cover two to three years of support. Research grants about improving the use of research initiative will range between $100,000 and $1,000,000 and cover two to four years of support.

We realize this funding opportunity is not for evaluation; however, many Network members also conduct research. The Research Grants Application Guide is attached to this message.

Eligibility Requirements

  • Research project advances the Foundation’s interests in understanding programs, policies, and practices that reduce inequality or improving the use of research evidence.
  • Research project has compelling relevance for programs, policies, and practices affecting youth ages 5-25 in the U.S.
  • Funds primarily support research activities, not intervention or service costs.
  • Applicant is employed at a tax-exempt organization

The online application for a research grant is now open. The next deadline for submitting letters of inquiry in 2017 is May 3, 2017 at 3:00 pm EST. More information about this opportunity can be found via this link (http://wtgrantfoundation.org/grants/research-grants).

Navigating Culture and Care Series

The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH—pronounced “KIRK-uh”) is offering a series on Navigating Culture Care, presented by Jennifer Prasek.

The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) brings together tribal communities and health researchers within SD, ND, and MN. Our goal is to build tribal research infrastructure and transdisciplinary research teams to improve American Indian health through examination of social and environmental influences on health.

CRCAIH helps tribal communities and health professionals plan and perform research addressing the health issues of American Indians (AI) in South Dakota, North Dakota, and Minnesota.

Jennifer Prasek

Jennifer Prasek is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe in South Dakota. Raised in SD, she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from the University of Minnesota. She began her career in Human Resources, and has applied her experience in project management and Diversity & Inclusion into the design, implementation and training of cultural, human resources, conflict resolution and team building models for various organizations across the region.

Jen works with organizations looking to enhance their scope and impact. She provides consultation related to long-term strategic planning, grant development, process improvement, human resources and performance management, organizational leadership and development, cultural sensitivity and community engagement.

For more information, please contact Jen at prakotallc@outlook.com.

Friday Funny! Research?

Research? You mean like Google?

BPC provides research services. Find out more!

Video: Collaborations with Native American Nations: Community Based Participatory Research

Please watch and share Team Roswell’s journey and approach to community based research efforts in Native American communities.

The piece helps create awareness, education, and notes the importance of Employee Assistance Programs as a means of prevention and intervention.

Special thanks to Roswell Park’s Office of Cancer Health Disparities Research, RPCI’s Health Behavior and Health Communications Resource Team, and our community media partner, Western Door Productions (Gary Sundown). An additional thanks to academic champion and actor Dr. Evan Adams for sharing insights to workplace health (a.k.a. “Thomas-Builds-the-Fire”; Smoke Signals)