Dr. Bowman Contributes to Population Guidelines for Native American Populations

Dr. Nicole Bowman contributed to Population Guidelines for Native American Populations (CA Reducing Disparities project). The report was submitted to the CA Office of Health Equity.

*Download the PDF of the report

BPC on Congressional Study

usda logoBPC co authored the Feasibility of Tribal Administration of Federal Nutrition Assistance Programs report and was CoPI on this Congressional Study for the United States Department of Agriculture.

*View the report as PDF

BPC Contributes to Congressional Study

usda logoBowman Performance Consulting contributed to the study Feasibility of Tribal Administration of Federal Nutrition Assistance Programs for the United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service. The full final report is now available!

Visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/feasibility-tribal-administration-federal-nutrition-assistance-programs to learn more!

Section 4004 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 required a study to determine the feasibility of Indian Tribal Organizations (ITOs) administering Federal nutrition assistance programs in lieu of State agencies. This study presents broad general findings regarding Tribal interest in administering nutrition assistance programs, ability to administer all or parts of these programs, and potential challenges.

Build Capacity with Dr. Bowman!

Join Dr. Bowman for Skill building Topic & content areas: Design, capacity building, education, theory and government.

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: An Model for Working with Tribal Governments & Communities

Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Munsee) Bowman Performance Consulting

When:  Monday, May 2nd, 2016

Where:  Harding Room

Chair:  Liesa Stamm, Rutgers University Camden

This capacity building session is for Indigenous and nonIndigenous evaluation partners to provide an overview and basic understanding of culturally responsive evaluation with Indigenous communities, in various Indigenous contexts (urban, rural, Reservation), and with Tribal Governments (USA).

See Dr. Bowman on the Eleanor Chelimsky Forum Tomorrow!

Dr. Bowman and Dr. Hood

Dr. Bowman and Dr. Hood

The Eleanor Chelimsky Forum

In its 4th year for the 2016 conference, the Chelimsky Forum on Evaluation Theory and Practice focuses on a conference theme through the eyes of selected luminaries from the evaluation field. Supported again by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this spring’s Forum Plenary Presentation will feature Stafford Hood, Director of the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment. The role of Forum Discussant will be served by Nicole Bowman, President and founder of Bowman Performance Consulting.

When:  Monday, May 2nd 9:00 to 10:15 am

Where:  Salons A and B

Introduction:  Jill Feldman, Westat

Continuing the Exploration of U.S Evaluation History during the Pre-Brown v. Board of Education Era (1930-1954) and the Nobody Knows My Name Project: A Notable Footprint in the U.S. Office of Education

Featured Speaker:  Stafford Hood, Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment

This presentation builds upon previous work undertaken by Hood (1998, 2001; Hopson & Hood, 2005; Hood & Hopson, 2008, and Anderson-Frazier & Bertrand-Jones 2015) as part of the “Nobody Knows My Name” project. This project aimed to discover and acknowledge our roots in the evaluation field by illuminating the untold contributions of African American educational researchers and evaluators to evaluation research in the United States during the pre-Brown era. This presentation provides an opportunity to reflect on Eleanor Chelimsky’s significant contributions to evaluation theory and practice within the context of the federal government while similarly considering the contributions of Ambrose Caliver, who in 1930 was appointed the Specialist in the Education of Negroes in the U.S. Office of Education’s Division of Special Problems. Caliver became a significant figure, contributing to efforts to meld culturally-informed theory and practice in responding to the educational inequities facing African Americans of the day.

Discussant:  Nicole Bowman, Bowman Performance Consulting

*This session will be videotaped.

 

Download the LEAD Flyer! Get to Know The LEAD Center: Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination

LEAD flyerDownload PDF!

Download the LEAD Flyer! Get to Know The LEAD Center: Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination

Does LEAD Need You?

Program Evaluation for Proposals

We can meet with you to discuss your program or proposal ideas. Please call (608) 263-4256 or email: cmpribbenow@wisc.edu

Current proposal deadlines

Title: Education grants
Sponsor: Lumina Foundation for Education
Deadline: Ongoing; letters of inquiry accepted year round
Summary: Lumina’s goal is to increase the higher education attainment rate of the United States to 60% by 2025. While the Foundation’s mission focuses on both student access and success in higher education, its emphasis is on attainment, defined as completing associate and baccalaureate degrees and credentials. The Foundation focuses on increasing awareness of the benefits of higher education, improving student access to and preparedness for college, improving student success in college, and productivity across the higher education system. See the website for the foundation’s current funding strategies.
URL: http://www.luminafoundation.org/grants.html


Title: Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP)
Sponsor: NSF 16-552
Deadlines: June 14, 2016 and December 9, 2016
Summary: AGEP seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success for historically underrepresented minority doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty, particularly African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders, in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields. New and innovative models are encouraged, as are models that reproduce and/or replicate existing evidence-based alliances in significantly different disciplines, institutions, and participant cohorts.
URL: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16552/nsf16552.htm


Title: Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs
Sponsor: Institute of Education Sciences, Department of Education
Deadline: August 4, 2016
Summary: IES’s research grants program is meant to provide the public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These grants provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability, and (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education. In carrying out its grants program, IES provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need and will conduct competitions in FY2017 through two of its centers.

The National Center for Education Research (NCER) will hold six competitions in these areas (topics in parentheses):

  1. Education research (Cognition and Student Learning; Early Learning Programs and Policies; Education Leadership; Education Technology; Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching; English Learners; Improving Education Systems; Mathematics and Science Education; Postsecondary and Adult Education; Reading and Writing; Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning; and Special Topics, which include Arts in Education; Career and Technical Education; and Systemic Approaches to Educating Highly Mobile Students);
  2. Education research training (Pathways to the Education Sciences Research Training [NOTE: An institution may submit only one application to the Pathways Training Program]; Postdoctoral Research Training; and Methods Training for Education Researchers);
  3. Statistical and research methodology in education (Statistical and Research Methodology Grants; and Early Career Statistical and Research Methodology Grants);
  4. Partnerships and collaborations focused on problems of practice or policy (Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships in Education Research; and Evaluation of State and Local Education Programs and Policies);
  5. Low-cost, short-duration evaluations; and
  6. Research networks (Exploring Science Teaching in Elementary School Classrooms; and Scalable Strategies to Support College Completion).

The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold three competitions in these areas (topics in parentheses).

  1. Special education research (Autism Spectrum Disorders; Cognition and Student Learning in Special Education; Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education; Families of Children with Disabilities; Mathematics and Science Education; Professional Development for Teachers and Other Instructional Personnel; Reading, Writing, and Language Development; Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning; Special Education Policy, Finance, and Systems; Technology for Special Education; and Transition Outcomes for Secondary Students with Disabilities).
  2. Special education research training; and
  3. Low-cost, short-duration evaluations.

URL: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=282060 and https://federalregister.gov/a/2016-05155

Add This to your Reading List!

new book picDr. Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

Why Bowler Schools are Unique

Dr. Nicole Bowman answers why Bowler Schools are unique. One reason is the low turnover rates of the principal and superintendent. Average turnover is 3.2-3.5 years. At Bowler schools these positions have been filled for 7+ years by the same individuals.

Be sure to watch the entire playlist from Dr. Nicole Bowman’s PhD oral dissertation for more information.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldcCVGMPEYE

LEAD Projects

LEAD-center-logoProjects

Advanced Fellowships in Women’s Health HUB Site-VA
Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS)
Biology Scholars Program
Fair Play
Mentor Training
Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation
Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI)


Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative, 2011-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluators: Sara Kraemer

Delta’s Academic Excellence Initiative (AEI) is a University of Wisconsin-Madison program whose aim is to close the opportunity gap in undergraduate courses through changes in course instructor practice and pedagogy. Course instructors attend an eight week immersion to learn about key opportunity gap and diversity issues at U.S. college campuses broadly and UW-Madison campuses specifically, followed by developing and implementing research-based course interventions. In our formative evaluation study, Sara Kraemer has been a member of the AEI team, administering instructor-based surveys and working one-on-one with faculty to evaluate their student data and develop target areas of support. AEI has partnered with the UW-Madison’s HOPE Lab to provide summative impact analysis on student achievement and faculty knowledge and attitudes about opportunity gaps and diversity at UW-Madison.


Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL), 2014-2015

Project site: University of Wisconsin-Madison
Evaluator: Sara Kraemer

The Wisconsin Collaboratory for Enhanced Learning (WisCEL) facilitates innovative teaching and student-centered active learning by providing instructional support and resources in unique technology-enhanced learning spaces on the UW-Madison campus.

Sara Kraemer conducted a mixed-methods evaluation study of a Math 112, an introductory mathematics course that fulfills mathematics requirements for undergraduate students. The study evaluated the impact of the WisCEL on student engagement, student achievement, and perceptions about the efficacy of the WisCEL learning experience in Math 112. Formative evaluation included a student survey, a focus group with TAs, and observations of Math 112 classes to asses student engagement. Summative evaluation included a statistical analysis of student achievement scores (i.e., end of course grades, drop rates) of Math 112 courses before they were taught in WisCEL compared to Math 112 coursers after they were taught in WisCEL. Summative results revealed that the WisCEL classroom had a positive impact on student achievement scores (as a whole and across demographic groups) – students were more likely to receive higher grades and have lower rates of drop out in the WisCEL classroom than in the non-WisCEL classroom. The findings were triangulated with the survey and focus groups results to assess how the classroom instruction interacts with the features of the WisCEL space.

WisCEL program managers are using the evaluation findings for program improvement, a proof-of-concept to campus stakeholders, validation of the program’s efficacy, and assessment of transferability of evaluation methods to other WisCEL courses.


Crossroads Project: Intersecting Workshops, Learning Communities, and Research in Biology to Promote Student Success in STEM, NSF-IUSE Program (PI: Loretta Brancaccio-Taras), 2015-2018

Evaluator: Sara Kraemer
Project Site: Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York

The Crossroads Project at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is designed to strengthen the skills, retention, and graduation rates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students. The project targets biology majors, and is specifically designed to support introductory biology students in success in the course, as well as progression through the biology or other STEM majors through three major efforts. The three major efforts are: (1) Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, (2) Community of Biology Learners sessions, and (3) Campus as Research Lab. The workshops and sessions are aimed to enhance student learning through development of study skills in STEM and biology and create cohesion and community through structured group-engagement outside of the classroom. The Campus as Research Lab provides an opportunity for students to work like scientists with KCC faculty, by engaging in the scientific inquiry process and conducting basic experiments.

The evaluation study of the Crossroads Project is a mixed-methods design that includes both formative and summative analysis. For the Strategies for Student Success in STEM Workshop, the summative analysis is comprised of statistical analysis of end of course grades for biology students and the formative analysis is an end of course survey to assess student perceptions of the impact of their experience on their academic success. For the Community of Biology Learners, a formative evaluation content analysis of student answers to assignments as well as a written instructor’s log of teaching practices. For the Campus as Research Lab, the evaluation component is a qualitative content analysis of student writing course assignments and an end of course student survey.

* Information from http://lead.wceruw.org/projects.html