Hiring! Assistant Professor of Environment, Health, and/or Governance

University of Washington-Seattle Campus: College of Arts and Sciences: American Indian Studies

Assistant Professor of Environment, Health, and/or Governance

Location: Seattle, WA

Closes: Dec 1, 2017at 11:59 PM Eastern Time

(GMT-4 hours)

The Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Washington seeks a full-time (100% FTE, 9-month term), tenure-track Assistant Professor whose research and teaching engages American Indian and Indigenous Studies through the study of environment, health, and/or governance. The successful candidate will be trained in the social and/or natural sciences (or related fields) and have experience with tribal communities. Scholars whose work intersects with Indigenous health and wellness, climate change, economic development, politics, transnationalism, and environmental concerns as they relate to tribal resource management are of particular interest. Ideal candidates should have scholarship addressing the entangled relations among Indigenous nations; Indigenous communities; federal, state, and local governments; Western science; capitalism; Indigenous cultural revitalization movements; and/or Indigenous knowledges.  All University of Washington faculty engage in teaching, research and service.

American Indian Studies (AIS) at UW is a multidisciplinary academic department that offers an undergraduate major and minor. It is also home to the Native Voices graduate program in Indigenous film, video, and digital media. The department’s faculty members represent a range of disciplines and approach their teaching and research from a decolonizing, community-based, and global perspective. The department works with national and regional Indigenous communities through the UW Tribal Leadership Summit, Native American Advisory Board, the UW wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Intellectual House, as well as campus symposia and conferences. AIS is a campus leader in facilitating the recruitment and retention of American Indians, First Nations, and Indigenous faculty and students.

QUALIFICATIONS

The successful candidate will demonstrate the potential for excellence in research, teaching, service, mentorship, and community engagement. A Ph.D. (or foreign equivalent) or comparable terminal degree must be in hand by the start date. The appointment will begin in September 2018.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Please submit a letter of application, your curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, two relevant course syllabi, and a writing sample (either a published journal article, book chapter, or chapter from your dissertation) to:

http://apply.interfolio.com/45756

Preference will be given to applications received by November 15. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

Vice President of Research and Evaluation role at IFF

Responsibilities:

The Vice President for Research and Evaluation will be responsible for the following:

Grow research consulting business

  • Innovate in response to marketplace: develop research consulting products that inform and guide social impact investments into social service sectors and comprehensive community development.
  • Prepare and manage annual budget for research department. Manage projects and staff time to meet established utilization rate and financial sustainability goals.
  • Develop client outreach strategy to maintain pipeline of contracted and grant supported research projects. Grow research network through meetings, presentations and marketing. Coordinate with regional staff, EDs and SVPs/VPs in selling research products.
  • Coordinate with Resource Development Department to identify funders and raise philanthropic dollars for research projects.
  • Evaluate internal tools for potential commercialization and work to bring those tools to market.

Oversee research team and portfolio

  • Maintain IFF research brand: ensure all studies and research products maintain IFF’s high standard of rigor, integrity and intellectual independence, while being pragmatic and actionable with practical recommendations based in best practice.
  • Develop project proposals and budgets. Negotiate contracts. Manage grants and funder relationships. Collaborate in funder report preparation, as necessary.
  • Support, inspire and guide staff in the implementation of research projects.

Nurture data culture at IFF

  • Supervise cross-departmental data management and data analysis team. Ensure high levels of data integrity, accessibility and integration.
  • Collaborate with IFF staff on the development of internal dashboards to track financial and non-financial data to drive and continuously reassess IFF transformative strategies.
  • Connect IFF data and external data to provide strategic insight into markets, sectors and impact.

Design and oversee program evaluation and impact measurement strategy

  • Design metrics to measure IFF social impact in consultation with the Executive Management Team.
  • Design methodologies, policies and procedures to capture lessons learned, build institutional knowledge and inform broader initiative. Work with other lines of business to implement.
  • Collaborate with other departments to design and implement program evaluation of major IFF initiatives.

Strengthen IFF’s position as a thought leader in key markets and sectors

  • Prepare and deliver public presentations to disseminate research findings for research projects.
  • Produce white papers to communicate insights gleaned from IFF initiatives for internal audience.
  • Identify opportunities to showcase insights relevant to external audience, and facilitate dissemination or publication of publish findings.
  • Collaborate with Corporate Communications and Public Affairs (CCPA) to develop public communication plans for research studies, public-facing tools and relevant lessons learned.

*View the complete listing here.

Business Plan Basics – November 2nd

Small business owners, entrepreneurs and aspiring business owners are invited to attend “Business Plan Basics” onThursday, November 2nd. The class will run from 6-9 pm. at Western Dairyland Business Center, 418 Wisconsin St., Eau Claire.
Class participants will learn how to create an effective and engaging business plan that can be presented to lenders or simply used to guide the launch and growth of a new business. Tuition is $29. Class materials are included. Scholarships are available for income-eligible individuals.
A business plan is an important document for anyone starting a new business, expanding an existing business, or launching a new product. Fundamentally, a business plan will include a mission statement, business description, product description, market analysis, marketing plan, operations plan, management plan and financial projections. However, more than just a document, the process involved with putting the components of a business plan together will help the entrepreneur identify and mitigate risk.
Kelly Berry is the owner ofResourceAbility, LLC and has been in business for over 12 years. She specializes in research, marketing planning, strategic planning and project management. Kelly is approved as a Service Provider for the Wisconsin Center for Technology Commercialization to write business plans and commercialization plans funded by state grants. She enjoys working with entrepreneurs and small business owners across Western Wisconsin
There are three easy ways to register and pay for the class: online at www.SuccessfulBusiness.org, by phone at 836-7511 ext. 1171, or in person at the Western Dairyland office in downtown Eau Claire. Because space is limited, pre-registration and payment is required.

Mass Shooting Response Resources

Please consider these trauma related resources for employers, employees, community members, families, and children from SAMHSA.

We are devastated and heartbroken by the tragedy that occurred this past weekend when a gunman opened fire at a concert in Las Vegas, Nevada. Our thoughts are with the victims, their loved ones, and our colleagues at Nevada’s System of Care. Below are resources to assist your communities’ response to mass shootings and other violent events:

  • SAMHSA Resources:
  • General Resources:
  • Resources for Parents and Guardians:

Dr. Jolene Bowman Named President of NIEA

Dr. Jolene Bowman, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Vice President and WIEA Board Member to be sworn-in as NIEA President
Swearing in to take place on Saturday, October 7th at 48th Annual National Indian Education Association Convention & Trade Show in Orlando, FL

ORLANDO, FL – After waiting nearly a year to take her seat as the board president of the National Indian Education Association, Dr. Jolene Bowman will officially take the reigns this afternoon when she is sworn-in at the organization’s 48th Annual Convention & Trade Show at the Caribe Royal Orlando Hotel and Convention Center.

Dr. Bowman brings with her a strong presence and solid understanding of the issues facing American Indian students and communities. Hailing from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin, where she serves as the tribe’s governing board Vice President, Bowman has long been a proponent of widening the educational opportunities of American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

“I plan to use my new position to advocate for Indian education and Native students by getting in the know about the particular subject or issue students may be experiencing,” said Bowman. “I not only want to work through those challenges but also celebrate the accomplishments of our people.”

Bowman was elected president at last year’s NIEA convention held in Reno, NV. and has spent the last year building momentum for her new post through her work as both secretary for the organization and board member of the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

WIEA president Brian Jackson says he’s excited to see the impact Bowman will have on Indian education in Wisconsin and across the nation.

“I’m confident Dr. Bowman will continue NIEA’s efforts to increase educational opportunities for Native students everywhere,” said Jackson. “Women are the backbone of our Native communities. She has a strong sense of identity and has demonstrated her ability to lead through her previous successes working in tribal communities,” added Jackson, who traveled to Orlando in support of Bowman and Wisconsin Indian education.

One of Bowman’s first orders of business as NIEA president will be to address the growing funding needs of Indian education at the federal level.

“NIEA is the only organization that is exclusively working on behalf of native students to ensure that our trust responsibility is being upheld,” said Bowman, referring to the federal government’s treaty and trust responsibility to American Indian tribes.

“In the current context, Indian education was under attack in the last (federal) budget and NIEA will continue to work diligently to ensure our Native schools and Native student populations are funded,” Bowman added.

Bowman will serve a one (1) year term as board president, which will run concurrent to her other obligations in Wisconsin.

The 48th annual NIEA Convention & Tradeshow runs October 4 – 7, 2017, in Orlando, FL.

New Teacher Recruitment Resource Now Live!

NIEA Announces Launch of Teacher Recruitment Website
The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) is excited to announce the launch of a new resource to support Native serving schools recruit great teachers. In partnership with The New Teacher Project (TNTP), a national education non-profit organization, we have launched teach.niea.org– a teacher recruitment website specifically designed to support Native schools recruit and hire great teachers.
Education connects our past and our future-protecting the uniqueness of our cultural identity. Numerous states across the country are experiencing shortages- Native serving schools in rural areas are often the most negatively impacted. Native teachers only make up only 0.5%of teachers nationwide and our students suffer as a result. This new resource will help Native schools equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to thrive in the classroom and beyond.
Native schools are looking for Native teachers with:
  • Commitment: Culturally-responsive teachers who embed culture into curriculum and instruction–preparing students to graduate ready for college, career, and community success.
  • Adaptability: Teachers with a nuanced understanding of the challenges Native students face, sensitive to the unique cultures of individual tribes and students, comfortable with productive struggle, and responsive to cultural differences while upholding the belief that all children can learn.
  • Instructional Expertise: Teachers who know their subjects inside and out; who understand the importance of instructional planning, using a challenging curriculum to empower students to learn; and who never stop learning and improving themselves.
  • Respect for Sovereignty, Identity, and Self-Determination: Teachers focused on shaping future leaders, honoring tribal languages and traditions, and protecting cultural identity.
  • Qualifications in High-Demand Areas: Teachers with middle and high school, SPED, STEM, and language and culture certification.
Please take a few minutes today and share this opportunity with educators you know. Thank you for helping us protect our most precious resource-our youth, those who will carry on our culture, language, and traditions.
About The National Indian Education Association (NIEA)
NIEA is the Nation’s most inclusive advocacy organization advancing comprehensive culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Formed by Native educators in 1969 to encourage a national discourse on education, NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles- to convene educators to explore ways to improve schools and the educational systems serving Native children; to promote the maintenance and continued development of language and cultural programs; and to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and decision makers. For more information visit www.niea.org.
Donate to NIEA

Whether you’re an educator, a student, or invested in increasing educational opportunities for Native students, NIEA members help advocate for better policies. Your  contribution will help us continue to be effective advocates, train educators that work with Native students, and close the achievement gap.  To donate, please click HERE.

Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011

STEM Innovation Summit 2017

The Einstein Project invites administrators, educators and other STEM education stakeholders to participate in this opportunity to promote excellence in K-12 STEM initiatives.  We are hosting this free STEM Innovation Summit on Thursday, November 16, 8 AM to 3 PM at the UW-Green Bay Weidner Center.  Join us to hear featured guest speakers from The Smithsonian Science Center, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, as well as panel discussions with experts in the field of Makerspaces and curriculum implementation of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Learn how updates to Wisconsin’s science standards will impact your STEM curriculum and professional development needs. Hear about the successes and challenges from district leaders already making changes to meet the rigor envisioned in the Next Generation Science Standards. District team participation is encouraged to help you to develop a shared vision for the future and chart a course to remain on the cutting edge in STEM education.

Schedule

8 AM – Registration
9 AM –  STEM Talks
10 AM – Makers Mindset
11 AM – Lunch
12:15 PM  –  WI Standards Panel
1:30 PM – Smithsonian Interview
3 PM – Talk Tank Reception

 

Registration can be found at http://einsteinportal.2bsolutions.net/public-events/

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated and More Insights from Community Science

*View the Community Science Newsletter online.

September 2017

The Tragedy of Professionalizing Social Change: We Are the System We Seek to Change
By: David Chavis, PhD, President/CEO
There is little doubt that this country and this world are seeing monumental challenges that we have not seen in decades, if ever. Racism and other forms of hate have become legitimized in many more places than we have seen in a while. There is a rise of authoritarian rule, “bullyism,” and violence against women and minorities. In this country, the basic social contract of a caring state and a common community (e pluribus unum – or “out of many, one”) is being threatened on nearly an hourly basis. The good news is that there has been a large-scale outcry from all corners of our society over many of the abuses and abusiveness. People are organizing across race and class to try to turn these trends around, and to promote equality and inclusion in this great country…
Early this year, our friend and colleague Rodney Hopson came to speak to our staff on culturally competent evaluation, as part of our internal professional development series. Rodney ended his workshop by reading a poem based on the lyrics to a song by the great jazz artist Gil Scot-Heron entitled The Revolution Will Not Be Televised as part of a 2011 tribute to evaluation thought leader Michael Scriven. We have dedicated this issue of The Change Agent to Rodney’s message. That message is a wake-up call to all of us “professionals” that if we want to see change, it is not going to come in a contract, grant, or billable hour. It’s going to come only by rejoining the social justice movement, not as an expert, but as a participant.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated
An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation
By: Rodney Hopson
Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development

George Mason University

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.”

Staff Profile: Maria Fernanda Mata

Maria Fernanda Mata, MA Analyst, has experi-ence in social science research, program development, public policy, and advocacy, particularly in the areas of community engagement, access to healthcare and social support, immigration, and social mobility. She is particularly interested in the application of quantitative and qualitative research to improve programs and services that empower racially and ethnically diverse communities. At Community Science, Maria is working to develop a tool kit that community- and faith-based organizations can use to reach and increase healthcare access for the most vulnerable populations. As part of this project, she is helping to identify strategies to educate communities of color and individuals with limited English proficiency, low literacy, or low health insurance literacy about the importance of obtaining health insurance coverage and the benefits of accessing preventive healthcare. Prior to joining Community Science, Maria Fernanda served as programs research associate for the National Hispanic Council on Aging, where she led program and policy research on key issues impacting Hispanic communities, including health, retirement security, and access to social programs.

Read more

Webinar: “USDA Farm-to-School Grants”

FREE WEBINAR!

USDA Farm-to-School Grant-Application Process: Engaging Tribal Communities & Producers
Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Noon Pacific / 1 p.m. Mountain / 2 p.m. Central / 3 p.m. Eastern

Coming up in the free First Nations Knowledge webinar series is USDA Farm-to-School Grant-Application Process: Engaging Tribal Communities & Producers. This webinar will provide an overview of the FY 2018 Farm-to-School Grant Request for Applications. Learn about the goal of this funding opportunity, eligibility requirements, the application process, and how to set your team up for grant-application success! This webinar is tailored to applicants interested in crafting proposals that will serve Native communities.