Teaching STEM In Ways that Respect and Build Upon Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

What Is The Issue?

Indigenous ways of knowing are sometimes thought to be in opposition to and detrimental to the learning of Western Science or STEM. Consequently, indigenous ways of knowing are rarely engaged to support learning. If STEM learning is to be meaningful and transformative for Indigenous youth, respecting Indigenous peoples rights and related critical issues, including Indigenous STEM, settler-colonialism, and decolonization, must be understood and explicitly addressed in Indigenous youths’ informal and formal STEM learning experiences.

Find out more!

Tribal Community-Based Social Marketing Training Guide

EPA Region 5 partnered with the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa to create a Community-Based Social Marketing (CBSM) Training Guide. This training guide provides an overview of how to use the CBSM process to increase the adoption of sustainable behaviors within the community.

Some features of the CBSM Training Guide include:

– PowerPoint overview of CBSM that you could use to educate your team or other stakeholders you would like to involve in designing a CBSM project;

– Checklists for when and how to use specific CBSM strategy tools;

– Case study on how the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College increased its recycling rate by 41% using the CBSM process; and

– Recycling Toolkit that provides step-by-step templates for conducting the CBSM process to promote recycling or other sustainable behaviors, based on Fond du Lac’s experience.

You may need Adobe Reader to view files on this page. See EPA’s About PDF page to learn more.

Information from: https://www.epa.gov/tribal-lands/tribal-community-based-social-marketing-training-guide

Discovery Research PreK-12 Program Solicitation

National Science Foundation

Directorate for Education & Human Resources
Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter’s local time):

November 14, 2017

November 14, 2018

Synopsis of Program:

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal’s main objectives and research questions. The program supports five types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, and (5) Conferences and Syntheses. All five types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands.

Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

Submit your Proposal for Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL)

Full Proposal Deadline Date

November 6, 2017

SYNOPSIS

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

CONTACTS

Name Email Phone Room
Address Questions to the  Program DRLAISL@nsf.gov (703)292-8616
For administrative questions contact the Program by e-mail at DRLAISL@nsf.gov or phone at (703)292-8616

Announcement of an Effort to Expand the NSF INCLUDES National Network

National Science Founation welcomes three types of proposals:

EAGER Proposals should produce findings and results that will generate new insights for the NSF INCLUDES National Network, suggest potential strategies for engaging NSF’s existing broadening participation activities in the Network and/or highlight lessons learned that could inform the NSF INCLUDES Launch Pilots and Alliances as they develop. EAGERs are encouraged that:

  1. Conduct research on the implementation and impact of strategies to improve specific problems of diversity and inclusion in STEM, especially strategies focused on expanding networks and scaling effective innovations. Studies should be grounded in the relevant social science, behavioral science, economic, or education research theories or frameworks, apply appropriate methods, and further the evidence-based research (e.g., the science of broadening participation) that illustrates the efficacy of the various approaches, especially collective impact-style approaches; or
  2. Examine strategies being used in projects in the existing NSF broadening participation portfolio. For example, research could examine the implementation, impact, network expansion, and scaling of change strategies used in NSF-funded projects within the NSF INCLUDES portfolio of Design and Development Launch Pilots, or projects funded through such programs as ADVANCE, the Broadening Participation in Computing Alliances, the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation(LSAMP), Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), and Math and Science Partnership, or the outreach activities of NSF research centers and large facilities aimed at broadening participation. Research could explore how strategies such as collective impact or networked improvement communities are being used to address the challenge of broadening participation in STEM.

Conference proposals to:

  1. Link to the NSF INCLUDES National Network the knowledge and results from the NSF broadening participation portfolio of programs and projects, and from NSF center-scale activities (e.g., Science and Technology Centers and Engineering Research Centers, among others), or other major Foundation investments, and encourage new opportunities for collaboration across the network;
  2. Generate novel ideas for how new and existing collaborations and organizations can help shape opportunities for connecting to the NSF INCLUDES National Network;
  3. Communicate research findings from the science of broadening participation research community to the NSF INCLUDES National Network, especially as these pertain to new efforts to translate basic research into practice; or
  4. Provide a platform for new collaborations within the NSF INCLUDES National Network to discuss the development of shared goals, common metrics, and mutually reinforcing activities.

Supplemental funding requests to:

  1. Create opportunities among currently-funded NSF projects, including NSF broadening participation projects, with the goal to build a collaborative infrastructure for broadening participation in NSF-funded research activities;
  2. Provide seed money for experiments in using effective strategies to further broadening participation goals through collaborative change;
  3. Develop linkages between current activities and NSF INCLUDES-funded Design and Development Launch Pilots, including adoption of common goals, shared measures, and mutually reinforcing activities; or
  4. Generate new ideas for bringing a community of NSF-funded projects into the NSF INCLUDES National Network.

Submission Deadlines and Special Instructions

There are two submission deadlines for funding requests in response to this Dear Colleague Letter. Before submitting EAGER or Conference proposals, eligible Principal Investigator(s) should email nsfincludes@nsf.gov with a one-page description of their project to determine suitability for this NSF INCLUDES Dear Colleague Letter and the appropriate deadline for the proposals. Any of the types of requests encouraged in this Dear Colleague Letter can be submitted to either deadline.

  • November 13, 2017
  • April 16, 2018

Funding requests for EAGERs and Conferences should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG): https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg. EAGERs may request up to $300,000 for two years. Conference proposals may be up to $250,000 for up to two years. EAGERs and Conference proposals should be submitted to NSF INCLUDES in the Human Resource Development (HRD) division.

Supplements from PIs of existing grants, other than current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, in any directorate are welcome. Eligible supplements must have the potential to enhance both the Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts of the existing project. Projects must have an end date beyond September 30, 2018. Eligible Principal Investigator(s) contact their cognizant Program Director(s) and an NSF INCLUDES team member to discuss their request for supplemental support prior to submitting to NSF. The amount requested for supplemental support must be less than 20% of the original award amount, with direct costs not to exceed $200,000. Funding is dependent on the availability of funds. Supplemental funding requests should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF PAPPG, Part II: Award and Administration Guide, Chapter I.E.4: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg.

More information available here: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17111/nsf17111.jsp

Evaluation 2017

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

American Indian Science & Engineering Society Opportunity for STEM students

Apply for the 4th “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” cohort! 

In 2014, AISES was awarded a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create the “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” program. The program’s goal is to increase the representation of American Indians, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty positions at universities and tribal colleges across the country. The program aims to create an intergenerational community of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and junior and senior faculty members.

This full circle of support will help guide students to successful degree completion and advancement to the next stage on the academic career path. In addition to full circle mentorship, the program strives to provide students with valuable academic and professional support, travel funding, and educational, research, fellowship, and internship opportunities.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Full time undergraduate student, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar in a field within Biological Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Geosciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, STEM Education, or Engineering at an accredited four-year college/university or two-year college. Must be enrolled in a program leading to an academic degree.
  • Interest in becoming a faculty member at a college, university, or tribal college.
  • Have a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or higher cumulative grade point average (GPA), with consideration being given to applicants reflecting somewhat lower GPAs but with high potential to raise the GPA above 3.0.
  • Current member of AISES.

Selection of students will seek balance with respect to a diversity of tribes, geographic areas in the United States, STEM majors, and gender. While the focus is primarily on American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and Native Hawaiians, all AISES members are eligible. The selection process will attempt to ensure that a diversity of STEM disciplines is reflected.

Scholars in the program will receive an annual participation stipend of $2,250 for two years, and two years of travel funding to attend the AISES National Conference and AISES Leadership Summit or discipline-specific professional conference. Scholars will be matched with an AISES selected faculty mentor to interact with at least monthly.  Scholars are required to participate in skill-building, professional-development in-person programming and webinars. Finally, scholars will have the opportunity to engage in an active community of Native STEM researchers.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

  • You must be either an undergraduate student, graduate student, or post-doctoral fellow to apply.
  • Complete the “Lighting the Pathway” application online:http://www.aises.org/content/lighting-pathway
  • Submit the following supporting documents to bhall@aises.org:
    • Unofficial transcript(s)
    • CV/Resume
    • One Letter of Recommendation
  • All applications and supporting documents must be received by July 24, 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact Kathy DeerInWater at kdeerinwater@aises.orgor 720-552-6123 ext. 107.

BEGIN APPLICATION

Fourth International CREA Conference

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). Early registration rate deadline AUGUST 25, 2017

*More info to come!

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

CRCAIH 2017 Pilot Grant Seminar Series

Final Presentation of the 2017 Pilot Grant Seminar Series 
If you can’t join us in person, register to listen live online.

East-Metro American Indian Diabetes Initiative: An Evaluation of Innovative Community-based Programs to Improve the Health of Native Men and Youth

Tai Mendenhall, PhD, University of Minnesota, Family Social Sciences

Date: August 7, 2017

Time: 9:00AM – 10:00AM 

Register

Renewable Energy Education Workshop

Renewable Energy Education in the Classroom

Monday, August 14

Midwest Renewable Energy Association, Custer

This workshop will offer renewable energy hands-on activities and classroom-based applications to help teachers analyze energy information and create strategies and techniques to enhance their students’ understanding of renewable energy. Activities include building a solar race car, siting a solar system, and building a shoebox solar cooker. Workshop participants will receive the KEEP Doable Renewables: Renewable Energy Education Supplement designed for teachers to use in their classrooms.

 

Registration Deadline: August 7

Facilitator: Sara Windjue

For more information, contact Jamie Mollica at jmollica@uwsp.edu

 

Register Today!