Policy Analysis: Native Students and Their White Peers

Many see education as the key to future opportunity and success for children of all backgrounds. However, deeply entrenched inequities can obstruct future opportunities and successes for many American Indian and Alaska Native students (hereafter referred to as Native students). These inequities are apparent in the substantial achievement gap that exists between Native students and their white peers. On national reading and mathematics exams, Native students perform two to three grade levels below their white peers. Additionally, Native students face myriad difficulties outside of the classroom, including high levels of poverty and challenges with both physical and mental wellness.

Despite these problems, opportunities exist for action that could positively impact educational outcomes for Native students. This report provides an overview of the major education issues the Native student population faces and the current policies that exist to address those issues at the federal and state levels.

View State and Federal Policy: Native American youth by ECS online as PDF

Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.

 

View entire report online (PDF)

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Call for Articles/Indigenous Knowledge: Other Ways of Knowing Open Access Journal

Call for Articles – Indigenous Knowledge

IK: Other Ways of Knowing<https://journals.psu.edu/ik/index>, a publication of Penn State Libraries Open Publishing, is currently seeking original research articles, book and new resource reviews, and field reports relating to indigenous knowledge for inclusion in upcoming issues. The journal particularly welcomes works with audio and visual components.

About the Journal

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, open access journal concentrating on indigenous knowledge and its application to solve complex problems in areas such as health, agriculture, education, law, and the environment. The journal also fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the different indigenous perspectives regarding the human identity and its place in societies across the world.

Indigenous knowledge focuses on ways of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down informally from generation to generation. The journal has a global scope and is interested in the research and application of indigenous knowledge in both “developing” and “developed” regions of the world. New issues of the journal are published twice per year, in June and December.

To Submit a Manuscript

Review the journal’s author guidelines<https://journals.psu.edu/ik/about/submissions#authorGuidelines> to register with the journal and begin a submission. Please contact Mark Mattson, Managing Editor (mam1196@psu.edu)<mailto:mam1196@psu.edu%29> with any additional questions.

OCIE Conference Workshop Proposal

OCIE has begun taking proposals for workshops and poster presentations for the 38th Annual Oklahoma Council for Indian Education Conference, which will be held December 4 & 5 in Durant. Please share this with anyone you think may be interested. For the first time, OCIE is offering a poster presentation session and would love to have a great turnout. This is a wonderful opportunity for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as well educators to present their ideas and projects!

The Call to Conference information is in the works and should be available in the next couple of weeks. We will have it on our website when it becomes available: http://oklahoma-ocie.org/index.html

Native Languages Summit, October 23-24

Join the Administration for Native Americans at our Native Languages Summit: Preserving the Heart of Our Cultures!

This language summit supports Native American communities seeking to retain and revitalize indigenous languages. Through a mix of plenary talks and workshops, we will discuss everything from data and evaluation, to creating fluent teachers, to family and community engagement and more. Language programs with similar approaches (e.g., language immersion, master-apprentice, or online learning) can work together to share solutions and strategies. This conference will be interactive as well as educational.

We will also celebrate 10 years of implementing the Esther Martinez Native American Languages Preservation Act, signed in December of 2006. Through a decade of investment, ANA has supported schools and community-based programs doing everything from curriculum development to teacher training. The Esther Martinez Immersion (EMI) grants support not only children, but their parents and families so that learning extends beyond the classroom and into the home and community. The vision for EMI funding came from our native communities, and we will use this summit hear from you about your vision for the future.

19th Annual AISA Conference – Feb 1 & 2

Announcing the 19thAnnual American Indian Studies Association Conference,  “Unsettling American History:  American Indian Studies in the time of the Trump Administration, White Supremacy, and Settler Nationalism” to be held on February 1 & 2, 2018 at Arizona State University, Tempe Campus.

The organizers of the AISA Conference welcome proposals for paper and panel presentations, posters, roundtables, film screenings, and workshops. Consideration will be given to other topics that relate to American Indian issues. Proposals from faculty; students at colleges, universities, and tribal colleges; community-based scholars, elders, and professionals working in the field are encouraged and welcomed.

The following topics are welcomed:

  • Decolonizing Public Space: Removing Settler Colonial Historical Presence
  • “Taking Sides” in Re-Presentations of US History
  • Healing through Resistance
  • Indigenous Lives Matter: American Indians in the Age of Trump
  • Re-Imagining the Indigenous Landscape: Trump Era Environmentalism
  • Struggle to Preserve Natural/Cultural Resources
  • Culturally Appropriate and Historically Accurate Memorials
  • Changing or revisioning monuments, names of people and places, boarding schoo

    s, and universities (Amherst College) that continue to glorify of the genocide of Indigenous Peoples.

Please see the PDF document for more information about the conference, and how to submit proposals. If you have any questions, please contact Michael Yellow Bird atMichael.Yellowbird@ndsu.edu or Aaron Woods at awoods@asu.edu .

Article: Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion

Congrats to Martin Reinhardt on publishing “Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion!”

Abstract: In 2016, Dr. Martin Reinhardt and Dr. Jioanna Carjuzaa produced a series of three webinars concerning Indigenous language immersion programs. The first webinar focused on broad curriculum development ideas including core relationships, guidelines and principles for effective pedagogy, and models. The second webinar focused on the elements of lesson planning. The third and last webinar focused on assessments and the use of rubrics aligned with Indigenous language standards. The content of the webinars has been transposed into the following chapter with certain modifications.

Subjects: Education; Education Studies; Multicultural Education; Curriculum Studies

Read the full article online!

Call for Articles – Indigenous Knowledge

IK: Other Ways of Knowing, a publication of Penn State Libraries Open Publishing, is currently seeking original research articles, book and new resource reviews, and field reports relating to indigenous knowledge for inclusion in upcoming issues. The journal particularly welcomes works with audio and visual components.

About the Journal

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, open access journal concentrating on indigenous knowledge and its application to solve complex problems in areas such as health, agriculture, education, law, and the environment. The journal also fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the different indigenous perspectives regarding the human identity and its place in societies across the world.

Indigenous knowledge focuses on ways of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down informally from generation to generation. The journal has a global scope and is interested in the research and application of indigenous knowledge in both “developing” and “developed” regions of the world. New issues of the journal are published twice per year, in June and December.

To Submit a Manuscript

Review the journal’s author guidelines to register with the journal and begin a submission. Please contact Mark Mattson, Managing Editor (mam1196@psu.edu)with any additional questions.

American Indian and Alaska Native Behavioral Health Webinar Series

Join us for a special webinar hosted by the American Indian and Alaska Native NPA Caucus

Project Venture, an evidence-based intervention, combines traditional native wisdom with positive youth development, social emotional learning, outdoor adventure, and service learning to create a unique approach that has been successful for more than 25 years. Beginning with a camp in Oklahoma during 1982, Project Venture has evolved into a model program recognized by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) that has been implemented in 25 states, 8 Canadian provinces, and Hungary. The National Indian Youth Leadership Project founded Project Venture and provides training, coaching, mentoring, curriculum development, and grant-writing assistance to program participants. The webinar will highlight the project’s core elements and guiding principles of this unique, internationally recognized native youth program and assist participants with exploring their readiness to implement it.

TOPIC: Project Venture – Positive Youth Development for American Indian and             Alaska Native Youth

DATE: September 20, 2017

TIME: 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time

SPEAKERS:

Moderator:

Dr. Francine Gachupin, Member, American Indian and Alaska Native NPA Caucus

 Presenter:

McClellan Hall, Founder and Executive Director of the National Indian Youth Leadership Project

Register Here*: http://tinyurl.com/ProjectVentureRegistration

View the abstract and bio here: http://bit.ly/2x8JEen

The American Indian and Alaska Native National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities (NPA) Caucus provides a forum for members to increase dialogue across the country and to coordinate and enhance tribal, state and local efforts to address health disparities and the social determinants of health for AI/ANs.

Visit the AI/AN NPA Caucus website for more information: http://aian.npa-rhec.org/.

*If the registration link does not work, please copy the entire link and paste it into your web browser. For webinar-specific questions, contact the moderator: csantos@explorepsa.com.