Call for Submissions: Decolonize This

Call for submissions due October 30!

In nearly a year of a Trump presidency, the visibility of White supremacists has risen. Corporate and government partnership has brought back the Dakota Access and Keystone oil pipelines even amid the visceral impacts of climate change in this year’s devastating hurricanes and wildfires. Yet, the destructive course we’re on isn’t surprising given North America’s colonial history, where wealth was built on cultural oppression, land dispossession, and the exploitation of both people and land. What disruptive forces are destructive enough andcreative enough to transcend this legacy?

Decolonization is needed. We heard it loudly at Standing Rock. We hear it every day from oppressed people. But what does that look like? Is it all or nothing? Does the idea of it differ by generation? How much is really possible? And who benefits—how might breaking free from systems of White supremacy be liberating for everyone?

To answer these questions, YES! will turn to Indian Country. We’re looking for powerful ideas and evidence of solutions and profound change headed our way—and we’re looking for Native writers to tell these stories.

Subject areas might include:

  • The future of the White male-centered dominant culture. The aging of the general population, the unique disruptive force that millennials present. The increasingly multi-ethnic population.
  • The human relationship to the ecosystem.
  • The changing nature of dissent as Indigenous movements become global and social media allows people to find their community despite where they live.
  • Land reform and reconnection to land and water. Rights versus responsibilities to the natural world.
  • Language and cultural revitalization. How are Indigenous cultures experiencing renewal in the modern world? How do we combat cultural and political amnesia? How do we differentiate among appropriation, appreciation, and sharing?
  • What of truth, reconciliation, and governmental apologies? What might be an Indigenous approach to healing centered on responsibilities, resurgence, and relationships?
  • What kind of economic development can connect Indigenous homelands, cultures, and communities?
  • Solidarity and allies. What have we learned in the year after Standing Rock, when Native communities here joined the global Indigenous movement in challenging corporate-government systems that destroy sacred land and water for profit? How was Standing Rock a movement for decolonization?
  • What might a just nation-to-nation relationship among Indigenous nations and settlers look like?

Are you an Indigenous writer or photographer who has an idea for a reported feature, deeply researched think piece, or personal essay that belongs in this issue of YES! Magazine? Send pitches and leads to decolonize@yesmagazine.org.

Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011

Policy Analysis: Native Students and Their White Peers

Many see education as the key to future opportunity and success for children of all backgrounds. However, deeply entrenched inequities can obstruct future opportunities and successes for many American Indian and Alaska Native students (hereafter referred to as Native students). These inequities are apparent in the substantial achievement gap that exists between Native students and their white peers. On national reading and mathematics exams, Native students perform two to three grade levels below their white peers. Additionally, Native students face myriad difficulties outside of the classroom, including high levels of poverty and challenges with both physical and mental wellness.

Despite these problems, opportunities exist for action that could positively impact educational outcomes for Native students. This report provides an overview of the major education issues the Native student population faces and the current policies that exist to address those issues at the federal and state levels.

View State and Federal Policy: Native American youth by ECS online as PDF

Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.

 

View entire report online (PDF)

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Call for Articles/Indigenous Knowledge: Other Ways of Knowing Open Access Journal

Call for Articles – Indigenous Knowledge

IK: Other Ways of Knowing<https://journals.psu.edu/ik/index>, a publication of Penn State Libraries Open Publishing, is currently seeking original research articles, book and new resource reviews, and field reports relating to indigenous knowledge for inclusion in upcoming issues. The journal particularly welcomes works with audio and visual components.

About the Journal

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, open access journal concentrating on indigenous knowledge and its application to solve complex problems in areas such as health, agriculture, education, law, and the environment. The journal also fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the different indigenous perspectives regarding the human identity and its place in societies across the world.

Indigenous knowledge focuses on ways of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down informally from generation to generation. The journal has a global scope and is interested in the research and application of indigenous knowledge in both “developing” and “developed” regions of the world. New issues of the journal are published twice per year, in June and December.

To Submit a Manuscript

Review the journal’s author guidelines<https://journals.psu.edu/ik/about/submissions#authorGuidelines> to register with the journal and begin a submission. Please contact Mark Mattson, Managing Editor (mam1196@psu.edu)<mailto:mam1196@psu.edu%29> with any additional questions.

OCIE Conference Workshop Proposal

OCIE has begun taking proposals for workshops and poster presentations for the 38th Annual Oklahoma Council for Indian Education Conference, which will be held December 4 & 5 in Durant. Please share this with anyone you think may be interested. For the first time, OCIE is offering a poster presentation session and would love to have a great turnout. This is a wonderful opportunity for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students as well educators to present their ideas and projects!

The Call to Conference information is in the works and should be available in the next couple of weeks. We will have it on our website when it becomes available: http://oklahoma-ocie.org/index.html

Native Languages Summit, October 23-24

Join the Administration for Native Americans at our Native Languages Summit: Preserving the Heart of Our Cultures!

This language summit supports Native American communities seeking to retain and revitalize indigenous languages. Through a mix of plenary talks and workshops, we will discuss everything from data and evaluation, to creating fluent teachers, to family and community engagement and more. Language programs with similar approaches (e.g., language immersion, master-apprentice, or online learning) can work together to share solutions and strategies. This conference will be interactive as well as educational.

We will also celebrate 10 years of implementing the Esther Martinez Native American Languages Preservation Act, signed in December of 2006. Through a decade of investment, ANA has supported schools and community-based programs doing everything from curriculum development to teacher training. The Esther Martinez Immersion (EMI) grants support not only children, but their parents and families so that learning extends beyond the classroom and into the home and community. The vision for EMI funding came from our native communities, and we will use this summit hear from you about your vision for the future.

19th Annual AISA Conference – Feb 1 & 2

Announcing the 19thAnnual American Indian Studies Association Conference,  “Unsettling American History:  American Indian Studies in the time of the Trump Administration, White Supremacy, and Settler Nationalism” to be held on February 1 & 2, 2018 at Arizona State University, Tempe Campus.

The organizers of the AISA Conference welcome proposals for paper and panel presentations, posters, roundtables, film screenings, and workshops. Consideration will be given to other topics that relate to American Indian issues. Proposals from faculty; students at colleges, universities, and tribal colleges; community-based scholars, elders, and professionals working in the field are encouraged and welcomed.

The following topics are welcomed:

  • Decolonizing Public Space: Removing Settler Colonial Historical Presence
  • “Taking Sides” in Re-Presentations of US History
  • Healing through Resistance
  • Indigenous Lives Matter: American Indians in the Age of Trump
  • Re-Imagining the Indigenous Landscape: Trump Era Environmentalism
  • Struggle to Preserve Natural/Cultural Resources
  • Culturally Appropriate and Historically Accurate Memorials
  • Changing or revisioning monuments, names of people and places, boarding schoo

    s, and universities (Amherst College) that continue to glorify of the genocide of Indigenous Peoples.

Please see the PDF document for more information about the conference, and how to submit proposals. If you have any questions, please contact Michael Yellow Bird atMichael.Yellowbird@ndsu.edu or Aaron Woods at awoods@asu.edu .

Article: Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion

Congrats to Martin Reinhardt on publishing “Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion!”

Abstract: In 2016, Dr. Martin Reinhardt and Dr. Jioanna Carjuzaa produced a series of three webinars concerning Indigenous language immersion programs. The first webinar focused on broad curriculum development ideas including core relationships, guidelines and principles for effective pedagogy, and models. The second webinar focused on the elements of lesson planning. The third and last webinar focused on assessments and the use of rubrics aligned with Indigenous language standards. The content of the webinars has been transposed into the following chapter with certain modifications.

Subjects: Education; Education Studies; Multicultural Education; Curriculum Studies

Read the full article online!