Must See Video – Discrimination in America: Native American Experiences

 

After watching the video “DISCRIMINATION IN AMERICA: Native American Experiences” presented in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR I knew I had to share. Watch it for yourself by clicking on the link below. This will be an eye-opener to those who are unaware of the discrimination Native Americans face on a daily basis and in the workplace. As 2017 comes to a close, let’s all promise to begin 2018 with an open mind and heart.

Link to Video: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/events/discrimination-in-america-2/ 

 

1st Annual Seminole Tribe of Florida Renewable Energy & Sustainability Conference

1st Annual Seminole Tribe of Florida Renewable Energy &

Sustainability Conference

Join Us February 7 – 9, 2018

·    Hear about innovative new projects

·    Network with tribal professionals

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

Tribal Officials, Tribal Housing Departments, Utility Staff, Tribal Code Officials, and Construction Staff

Limited to 80 seats.

Registration will open January 1st, 2018

Hosted at:

Native Learning Center

6363 Taft Street

Hollywood, FL 33024

 

Click to download the flyer

Q & A Session with Honoring Nations

Are you thinking of applying to the 2018 Honoring Nations award in good governance?  Do you have questions about eligibility, the application process, or the criteria?  If so, please join us for a Q & A session and let us answer your questions! Participation is not mandatory; however applicants are encouraged to participate.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 at 4pm EST
The toll-free call in number: 1-866-889-3913
The Conference Passcode: HN18

The Harvard Project’s Honoring Nations program invites applications from American Indian governments across a broad range of subject areas including:

  • Cultural Affairs
  • Economic and Community Development
  • Education
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Government Performance
  • Health and Social Services
  • Intergovernmental Relations
  • Justice

The 2018 Honoring Nations awardees will receive a monetary grant to share their stories of success: $2000 for honors and $5000 for high honors.  Awardees will also be featured in case profiles, nation-building curriculum, Google platforms, and through world-class exhibits showcased at the Smithsonian Institution.

At the heart of Honoring Nations is the principle that tribes themselves hold the key to positive social, political, cultural, and economic prosperity—and that self-governance plays a crucial role in building and sustaining strong, healthy Indian nations.  Honored programs give decision-makers fresh ideas about how to create sustainable economies, improve service delivery, protect and manage vital resources, administer justice, and educate tribal citizens.

Applications are due January 24, 2018 For additional information about this program, please contact:

SIGN UP

Poster: American Indian Perspectives on Thanksgiving

*Click to view the PDF by the National Museum of the American Indian.

Each November educators across the country teach their
students about the First Thanksgiving, a quintessentially
American holiday. They try to give students an accurate
picture of what happened in Plymouth in 1621 and explain how
that event fits into American history. Unfortunately, many teaching
materials give an incomplete, if not inaccurate, portrayal of the first
Thanksgiving, particularly of the event’s Native American
participants.

IPE TIG Week: Introduction to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG by Erica Roberts and Nicole Bowman

Erica Roberts

Hello and welcome to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG Week (November 19-24)! I am Erica Blue Roberts, a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, IPE TIG Program Chair, and AEA GEDI alumnus. And I’m Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape) the IPE TIG Chair. As we approach the Colonial celebration and Federal holiday of Thanksgiving, let us reflect on, redefine our understandings, and redirect our behaviors regarding the Original inhabitants of Turtle Island (North America) and Kukuna Auhy (Mother Earth). Together we can move from cultural appropriation and romanticized notions of the first Thanksgiving, to a cultural appreciation for the ongoing contributions by Indigenous people that isn’t limited by a holiday or season.

The IPE TIG was established in 2006 to give voice and recognition to the Indigenous members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and begin to infuse Indigenous evaluation practices into more mainstream evaluation. Indigenous evaluation approaches were developed as culturally-responsive ways of evaluating programs in Indigenous communities. Indigenous evaluation often values and incorporates Indigenous knowledge, recognizes the negative history of evaluation imposed on many Indigenous communities, and respects tribal and data sovereignty. For more information about Indigenous evaluation, look to the work of IPE TIG Founder – Joan France, IPE TIG Founder – Fiona Cram, IPE TIG Chair – Nicky Bowman, and IPE TIG Program Chair – Erica Roberts.

The IPE TIG strives to achieve the following goals to improve evaluation practices and methods:

  • Developing and disseminating knowledge that helps assure that evaluations in which Indigenous people are among the major stakeholders are culturally responsive and respectful of their interests and rights.
  • Creating a venue for Indigenous evaluators and others working in Indigenous contexts to participate in discourse about evaluation models and methods that support Indigenous values, practices, and ways of knowing.
  • Mentoring and emerging evaluators interested in evaluation in various Indigenous contexts.

This week you will get a chance to read about a variety of Indigenous evaluation topics from the TIG Leadership and its members. We chose to blog this week as it is the week of the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when many misconceptions about American Indians and Alaska Natives are shared. We hope that by providing you with an overview of Indigenous evaluation, you may be inspired to look into other ways that Indigenous knowledge can be integrated into mainstream practices and understandings.

Rad Resources:

To learn more about the IPE TIG, please visit our website., become a member, and check us out on Facebook and Twitter.

No More Pranks-Giving:  How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee) Native Appropriations website and blog is an interactive forum for discussing representations and contributions of Native peoples.

Rethinking Schools Blog Archives on “Rethinking Thanksgiving:  Myths and Misgivings

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG week. All posts this week are contributed by members of the IPE Topical Interest Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

*Info originally posted: http://aea365.org/blog/ipe-tig-week-introduction-to-the-indigenous-peoples-in-evaluation-tig-by-erica-roberts-and-nicole-bowman/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+aea365+%28AEA365%29

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEMBER 1, 2017

CONTACT:

Brian Jackson

President

Wisconsin Indian Education Association

Office: (715) 588-3800

Email: brian.jackson@ldfschool.org

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November

Organization issues open Call-to-Action to strengthen relations, address disparities faced by American Indians and ending the use of race based mascots.

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is proud to celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November. On August 3, 1990, President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. The Bill reads in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities.” Every year since, the Office of the President has issued a proclamation supporting the month as such. The landmark Bill honors America’s indigenous people.

In keeping with the essence of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association honors the unique culture, history and perseverance of the 11 federally recognized tribal nations within the state, as well as all Native nations across both North and South America.

WIEA President Brian Jackson says the organization is calling on tribal, state and local governments, public and private schools, tribal education programs and departments and civic groups alike to implement curriculum that strengthen educational offerings about Indigenous peoples in Wisconsin.

“For hundreds of years, American Indian history has been obscured, altered and in many instances erased from existence,” said Jackson. “It has long been a mission of WIEA to educate our non-Indian neighbors to the valuable contributions of Native Americans over the course of American history — many of which have allowed this country to attain a level of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by so many,” added Jackson.

As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is issuing a call to action to address three main areas in closing the cultural divide while increasing the socioeconomic, educational and political position of Wisconsin’s tribal nations:

  • An open challenge to local governments, schools, civic organizations and individuals to learn more about the historical and contemporary connections of your local community to neighboring tribes and tribal communities in general.
  • Request that school districts employing race-based mascots develop an exit strategy away from the use of American Indian or other race based imagery within one (1) year. This request is especially critical if a school within the district you reside or a school within your school’s athletic conference currently uses a race based mascot.
  • Contact your legislator(s) to request a repeal of the 2013 Wisconsin Act 115, which makes it nearly impossible for those who object to race-based mascots and sports team names to bring about change at their school district.

Over the nearly 25-year history of WIEA, the group has remained a catalyst in the effort to incorporate historically accurate Native American curriculum into Wisconsin public schools. The effort gained support when former Governor Jim Doyle (D) signed into law Wisconsin Act 31, which requires public schools to offer historically accurate instruction on American Indian tribes in the state. Act 31 was born as a result of the ugly and sometimes violent protests of the late 80s and early 90s organized by non-Indian groups opposed to Chippewa Treaty Rights. Ultimately, District Judge Barbara Crabb ruled in favor of tribal spearers who sought a permanent injunction prohibiting non-Indian protesters from interfering with their court affirmed Treaty Rights, finding the protests to be racially motivated.

In addition to the call-to-action initiatives, WIEA will participate in a National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots, which is scheduled for Friday, November 17, 2017. Tribes, communities, universities and groups across the country plan to hold local and national events. From documentaries and movie showings, to book readings and workshops, and cultural events, the National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots brings to the forefront the social issues caused by Indian and other race based mascots.

“We’re encouraging everyone to participate in American Indian Heritage Month along with the November 17th National Day-of-Action on Raced Based Mascots,” said Jackson. “We all have a responsibility to add to the quality of life in our respective communities. When we act in the spirit of cooperation and unity, we create the framework for a positive future for people of all races and cultures in Wisconsin and beyond.”

Jackson says that WIEA, along with the Indian Mascot and Logo Task Force, offer a host of educational resources that provide historically accurate, authentic information on Wisconsin’s Native nations. “Much of the general public’s views and misconceptions of American Indians is due to the lack of meaningful information,” said Jackson. “WIEA is open to partnering to provide materials, training, resources and information to any group or organization interesting in broadening their knowledge base on American Indians – that also includes widening their network and fostering positive relationships,” Jackson added.

The American Indian Heritage or Native American Heritage Month designation aims to provide a platform for Native people in the United States to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance and ways and concepts of life. This gives Native people and their allies the opportunity to express to their community, city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and cooperation in their local area.

###

For additional resources visit any one of the following websites:

www.indianmascots.com

www.wiea.org

www.wisconsinact31.org

www.dpi.wi.gov/amind/state-statues

About the Wisconsin Indian Education Association

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian Educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council (GLITC) Education sub-committee.

The GLITC Education Committee began in the early 1970’s but was disbanded around 1983 because of a lack of funds.

A group of concerned Indian Educators began meeting in 1984 and after a series of meetings during that year, developed By-laws and a mission statement.

The group was formally organized in 1985 as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

The Association has seven regions throughout the State. Each region elects/appoints two representatives as WIEA Board members for a two-year term.

Each Region’s Board members are responsible for hosting a meeting in their region throughout the year to share and gather information for the Board to either act upon or disseminate to all other WIEA members.

The Board meets every month except December. Meetings are held in the various regions throughout the state in an effort to get input from the general membership regarding their issues and concerns.

Spencer Foundation Conference Grant Program call for proposals

The Spencer Foundation has released its Conference Grant Program application for proposals to support small research conferences and focused symposia. The deadline to apply is December 1, 2017. Click hereto view more program details.

 

The foundation is specifically interested in funding conferences that focus on the topic of creating and sustaining equitable educational spaces specifically addressing how to support the advancement of learners who face structural and systemic barriers in their pursuit of educational opportunities.

Please contact Research and Sponsored Programs if you have any questions or are considering submitting a proposal to the Spencer Foundation.

 

NIH STEP-UP 11th & 12th Grade High School Portal Open

 

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK)

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

2017 American Indian/Alaska Native High School
NIH/NIDDK STEP-UP Cohort
The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held in Washington, D.C.
  • Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or permanent legal resident of U.S.- affiliated territory
  • High school junior or senior (at the time of application)
  • Must meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Part of an underrepresented racial or ethnic group (American Indian/Alaska Native).
    • Disadvantage as defined by annual family income
    • First generation in family to attend college
    • Diagnosed with a disability limiting one or more major life activities

Principal Investigator: Dr. Carolee Dodge-Francis
Emailcarolee.dodge-francis@unlv.edu
American Indian Research & Education Center (AIREC)

Apply at: http://stepup.niddk.nih.gov/Register.aspx
(If you are a new participant register as a new user and don’t forget to store your email/username and passcode, you will need later if you are a returning, second year use last years’ information)
Apply October 15, 2017 through February 15, 2018
Apply Now

 

Call for Submissions: Decolonize This

Call for submissions due October 30!

In nearly a year of a Trump presidency, the visibility of White supremacists has risen. Corporate and government partnership has brought back the Dakota Access and Keystone oil pipelines even amid the visceral impacts of climate change in this year’s devastating hurricanes and wildfires. Yet, the destructive course we’re on isn’t surprising given North America’s colonial history, where wealth was built on cultural oppression, land dispossession, and the exploitation of both people and land. What disruptive forces are destructive enough andcreative enough to transcend this legacy?

Decolonization is needed. We heard it loudly at Standing Rock. We hear it every day from oppressed people. But what does that look like? Is it all or nothing? Does the idea of it differ by generation? How much is really possible? And who benefits—how might breaking free from systems of White supremacy be liberating for everyone?

To answer these questions, YES! will turn to Indian Country. We’re looking for powerful ideas and evidence of solutions and profound change headed our way—and we’re looking for Native writers to tell these stories.

Subject areas might include:

  • The future of the White male-centered dominant culture. The aging of the general population, the unique disruptive force that millennials present. The increasingly multi-ethnic population.
  • The human relationship to the ecosystem.
  • The changing nature of dissent as Indigenous movements become global and social media allows people to find their community despite where they live.
  • Land reform and reconnection to land and water. Rights versus responsibilities to the natural world.
  • Language and cultural revitalization. How are Indigenous cultures experiencing renewal in the modern world? How do we combat cultural and political amnesia? How do we differentiate among appropriation, appreciation, and sharing?
  • What of truth, reconciliation, and governmental apologies? What might be an Indigenous approach to healing centered on responsibilities, resurgence, and relationships?
  • What kind of economic development can connect Indigenous homelands, cultures, and communities?
  • Solidarity and allies. What have we learned in the year after Standing Rock, when Native communities here joined the global Indigenous movement in challenging corporate-government systems that destroy sacred land and water for profit? How was Standing Rock a movement for decolonization?
  • What might a just nation-to-nation relationship among Indigenous nations and settlers look like?

Are you an Indigenous writer or photographer who has an idea for a reported feature, deeply researched think piece, or personal essay that belongs in this issue of YES! Magazine? Send pitches and leads to decolonize@yesmagazine.org.

Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011