College of Menominee Nation Wins Major Grant

The following is an announcement from Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

The office of U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin has announced a $798,199 grant from the U.S. Department of Education to help provide ACT preparation courses and leadership opportunities to Menominee Indian High School students. The award will be managed by the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) of the College of Menominee Nation.

Project partners collaborating with SDI include the College of Menominee Nation’s teacher education program and digital media program, Menominee Indian School District; Menominee Tribal School; Mawaw Ceseniyah, a community-based Menominee culture and language organization; and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Midwest Region Fire Prevention program. The four-year grant will enhance and expand SDI’s successful youth enrichment program model known as the Sustainability Leadership Cohort. Funding will bring new multifaceted activities centered on fire, which will help introduce language and culture teachings, science, technology, engineering and math concepts, along with leadership and responsibility. The students will gain a better understanding of how Indigenous ecological knowledge and Western science can interact, and how to apply that understanding to address environmental issues both inside and outside the classroom.

The project team will be providing more ACT preparation opportunities for the Menominee Indian High School students to generate an increase in the number of students who take the ACT and apply to college. In addition to receiving ACT preparation, students will work with teams made up of in-service and pre-service teachers, language and culture practitioners, and CMN staff to develop science lessons for elementary classrooms using Indigenous knowledge as the base. This work will take place on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin, at the College of Menominee Nation’s Keshena campus, the Menominee Tribal School, and in the Menominee Indian School District.

Both high school and undergraduate interns (pre-service teachers) will be hired in early 2018. Students will receive a stipend for participation in this program and have the opportunity to present their work at relevant conferences. Funding for the project, titled “Preparing Native Youth for the Future through the Sustainability Leadership Cohort,” is through the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and Office of Indian Education: Indian Education Discretionary Grants Programs: Demonstration Grants for Indian Children Program.

*Blog originally published here.

Faculty Position in Indigenous Community Studies

Open Rank faculty position in Indigenous Community Studies University of
Wisconsin-Madison The Department of Civil Society and Community Studies
(School of Human Ecology) and the American Indian Studies Program (College
of Letters and Science) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison invite
applications for a tenure-track faculty position, open to all ranks in
Indigenous Community Studies.

Position Summary:
This position is for a joint appointment with 50% in the Department of Civil
Society and Community Studies (tenure home) and 50% in the American Indian
Studies Program. We seek a candidate with expertise in community-engaged
scholarship, indigenous methodologies/evaluation, community leadership,
civil society or nonprofits and with tribal expertise. The area of research
is open and may include community/tribal health, environmental health,
community/tribal nutrition, indigenous knowledge systems, traditional
ecological knowledge, community/tribal education, social justice,
incarceration, etc. The candidate’s research should focus on Indigenous
peoples and issues within North America with a particular focus on Wisconsin
communities. The position requires scholarship, teaching, and service in a
department and a program serving undergraduate and graduate students. Other
desirable attributes include strong research methods, oral and written
communication skills and the ability to interact with an interdisciplinary
and collaborative intellectual community. Native American and minority
candidates are encouraged to apply.
Degree and area of specialization:
Holds a doctoral degree in a discipline relevant to the units and position
e.g. psychology, human development and family studies, social work, American
Indian studies, anthropology, education or related disciplines. Employment
contingent upon completion of degree.

The successful candidate will:
– Build community-academic partnerships with tribal/urban Indian communities
especially in Wisconsin.
– Maintain a coherent and productive program of research excellence.
– Seek and secure funding to support research partnerships.
– Teach graduate and undergraduate courses (2:2 load) and contribute to
program development.
– Supervise student research and provide high quality academic mentoring.
– Participate in shared governance and other departmental and university
service activities as appropriate for career stage.

Application link:
http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/496371/asst-assoc-or-full-professor-of-
indigenous-community-studies

Seeking Candidates for CMN Presidency

Position Summary:
Reporting to the Board of Trustees, the President leads the campus community in creating and implementing a
vision and strategy for the future of the College of Menominee Nation (CMN) that is responsive to the College’s
mission and capitalizes on the professional and intellectual strengths of CMN’s staff and faculty.  Leading by
example, the President fosters a strong sense of community and a commitment to higher learning.  He or she
establishes and enhances partnerships and relationships among tribal and external entities that align with the
College’s purpose and educational reputation, promote its sustainability, and serve its community.

Learn More!

An Artful August

August is full of opportunities to support our local solo artists and artist communities. Find the nearest art show or festival and bring the whole family for art exhibits, demonstrations, fun runs and even live art performances!

August 25th-27th

2017 Self-Determination Conference: Registration Open!

Registration is now open for the 2017 annual Self-Determination Conference. This conference works to empower people with disabilities in Wisconsin to have more control over their lives.

More than 600 people each year participate in the conference to learn about self-determination and self directed supports so they can live independently, be members of their communities, and use public funds efficiently.

Participants include people with disabilities and their family members, direct care providers, and professionals from Wisconsin’s disability community. 

Register Today! 

Nicole Bowman-Farrell on The Origin of Bowman Performance Consulting

Dr. Nicole Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman shares her story with the American Evaluation Association for IC TIG Week.

“Koolamalsi Njoos (greetings colleagues).  I’m Dr. Nicole Bowman-Farrell, the Founder and President of Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC), a consulting firm located in Wisconsin.  As a traditional Mohican and Lunaape – Munsee (AKA Delaware) Indigenous person, the concept of writing an origin story about BPC is steeped in traditional cultures.  If you know who you are and where you come from then those origin stories help shape how you do business.  BPC started in 2001 as a result of standing my ground professionally, ethically, and morally.”

Read more!

Training Grant Opportunity for Small Business & Construction Trades

The Department of Workforce Development (DWD) – Office of Skills Development (OSD) will be releasing Grant Program Announcements (GPAs) under Governor Walker’s Wisconsin Fast Forward(WFF) initiative for both Small Business Occupations and Construction Trades and Related Occupations.

Wisconsin employers and workforce partners are encouraged to start preparing innovative and collaborative customized training grant applications. Grantees may be awarded up to $400,000 to upskill construction trades and related occupations and up to $50,000 to upskill workers in small business settings.

Application details follow:

Worker Training Grants for:
– Small Business Occupations
– Construction Trades and Related Occupations

Grant Applications Open: June 09, 2017
Deadline to Apply: June 30, 2017 at 3:00 p.m.

Governor Walker’s WFF program was approved with overwhelming bipartisan support from lawmakers in 2013 to address the skills gap through grants to employers for customized skills training to fill current job openings and ongoing skill requirements. DWD has awarded over $18 million in WFF grant contracts to date, supporting nearly 200 worker training projects that are benefitting hundreds of businesses and thousands of trainees across the state. To learn more about WFF-funded worker training projects, please review grant award summaries.

Please contact OSD with questions regarding the WFF GPAs.

BPC is Hiring! Scientific & Technical Professional Personnel

Bowman Performance Consulting is hiring one exceptional individual to fill a Scientific & Technical Professional Personnel role. Please provide a resume and fill out an application by June 23, 2017. See PDFs below for details. Please no phone calls or faxes!

Occupational Detail: Social Science Research Assistants/Analysts, Evaluation Assistants/Analysts, Primary Investigators, Co-Primary Investigators, Technical Assistance Specialists, Technical Writers, Editors, Marketing/Communications Specialists Webpage Designers, Network Administrators, Computer Support Analysts/Assistants

Organizational Category:  Scientific/Technical; hourly or salary based on credentials, experience, context, and employment classification (employee vs. independent contractor/vendor)

Position Overview:  Scientific and technical positions at BPC include staff that is generally categorized into three functional areas:

  • Scientific (Social Science Research Assistants/Analysts, Evaluation Assistants/Analysts, Primary Investigators, Co-Primary Investigators).  Key duties include design, methodology, instrumentation, data collection, data analysis, scientific report writing, presentations, and publications as appropriate to staff credentials noted above.
  • Technical (Technical Assistance Specialists, Technical Writers, Marketing/Communications, and Editors).  Key duties include providing expertise in a given area (economic development, business development, transit plans, strategic plan, policy, legal, etc) or providing an expert skill set (editorial, APA editing, graphic design for marketing, formatting, final publications, communication, public relations, etc.) to the organization or a project.
  • Technology (Webpage Designers, Network Administrators, Computer Support Analysts/Assistants).  Key duties include providing expertise in technology related topics for the organization or client project as a one-time or ongoing process.  Specific skills, network, hardware, and software applications/applicable certifications/degrees are warranted for these positions.

*Job Description (PDF)

*Job Application (PDF)

Addressing the Misconceptions of Native Americans: The Role that History Plays in Our Schools

This is an image of diverse children learning.

Addressing the Misconceptions of Native Americans:The Role that History Plays in Our Schools 

June 16, 2017

Holiday Inn Stevens Point – Convention Center

Event Description
Western models of schools have historically been challenging places for Native American students to learn. History matters in teaching and learning! History has a profound effect on us all. What can we do to embolden and empower students to reflect the power that history has on us today? How can students use that history to make a better tomorrow? Join us for an opportunity to extend our understanding of knowing our neighbors while engaging in conversations about the historical impact of schools for Native American students with national speaker, Gyasi Ross.

First Cohort of Native Students to Graduate From UW Madison College Pipeline Program

Tacked to the wall of his bedroom on the Oneida Indian Reservation is evidence of how hard Michael Williams worked as a high school student — an acceptance letter to Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

But the real prize, the acceptance letter to UW–Madison, his dream school, travels with him in his backpack, always within reach.

Growing up, Williams, 18, says he watched too many young people flounder in their attempts to leave the reservation and find opportunities elsewhere. He was determined not to be one of them.

“I’ve always wanted to further my education,” he says. “The more I know, the better I feel personally. And I think college is the step to a successful job and a secure future.”

Williams participated in an extensive college pipeline program sponsored by UW–Madison for students from tribal communities. It is a new component of a long-running UW diversity initiative called the Information Technology Academy. The first cohort of 10 Native students, including Williams, is graduating from the program this spring and will be in Madison June 3 for a ceremony marking the occasion.

“The program changed my life,” says Williams, who plans to begin classes at UW–Madison this fall.

He had always hoped to attend college, he says, but UW had not been on his radar prior to the program. During a trip to Madison, he was captivated by the urban environment and found everything on the campus “new and exotic.” He could picture himself among the student body.

“I especially like the idea of walking to class every day and running into friends and new strangers,” says Williams, who has always traveled to school by bus or car. “It’ll be an experience I’ve never had before.”

The initiative is one of the most direct ways university administrators are trying to increase enrollment of American Indian students, currently estimated at just under 1 percent of 43,336 students.

A little background: The Academic Technology Department of the UW’s Division of Information Technology created the Information Technology Academy (ITA) 17 years ago. There are now three programs under its umbrella. All work to increase the number of students of color at UW–Madison and in the field of information technology — two areas where historically they’ve been underrepresented.

ITA Madison, the original program, began in 2000 and works with students from Madison public schools. Three years ago, the tribal component was added to more explicitly recruit American Indian students. It is called ITA’s Tribal Technology Institute and serves two communities: the Oneida Nation near Green Bay and the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin.

View entire article here