Call for Proposals – Hawai’i-Pacific Evaluation Association Conference

The Hawai’i-Pacific Evaluation Association <https://h-pea.org/> (an AEA affiliate), is accepting proposals for its 11th annual conference.
Deadline May 1, 2017.

*11th Annual Hawai’i-Pacific Evaluation Association (H-PEA)* *Conference and Pre-conference Workshops * *September 21 and 22, 2017* *Kane’ohe, Hawai’i*

*Featured Speaker: Michael Quinn Patton *

*Call for Proposals*
Presentations will be accepted on the theme: “Evaluation for a Complex World”

*Session Types*

– Demonstration
– Paper Presentation
– Poster Session
– Roundtable (Work-in-progress/Issue & discussion)
– Symposium

Participate in the H-PEA Best Poster Award In Honor of Lois-ellin Datta!
The Best Poster Award honors our esteemed colleague, Dr. Lois-ellin Datta, whose lifetime achievements in evaluation set a high bar for poster presentations in terms of relevance, rigor, precision, and quality. *Dr.
Datta has been a tireless and enthusiastic supporter of H-PEA, providing positive, unconditional support and guidance for novice and indigenous
evaluators.* Her support, both financial and strategic, have been instrumental in our on-going efforts to grow the Hawai`i-Pacific Evaluation Association. First place: $50; Second place: $30; Third place: $20

*Proposal submission link*: SUBMIT NOW
<https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HPEA2017> < <goog_2033828791> https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HPEA2017>
This form requires a summary, title, abstract, theme, intended audience and relevance statement.

*Important Dates:*
Proposal submission deadline: 5:00 PM HST, *May 1, 2017*.
Notification of acceptance: June 1, 2017 (via email)
Conference: September 22, 2017

For any questions regarding proposals, please contact Yao Hill < yaozhang@hawaii.edu>.

Thank you,
H-PEA Conference Planning Committee

Hawai’i-Pacific Evaluation Association (H-PEA) P.O. Box 283232, Honolulu, HI 96828
Webpage: http://h-pea.org
Email: info@h-pea.org

My Journey as an Aspiring Culturally Responsive Evaluator with Stafford Hood!

My Journey as an Aspiring

Culturally Responsive Evaluator

Stafford Hood

Professor, Curriculum & Instruction University of Illinois
College of Education

Graduate student brown bag (i.e., bring your own lunch)
Friday, April 7, 2016 • Noon – 1:30 pm
UW Madison, Ed Sciences Building, Room 259, 1025 West Johnson Street

Sponsored by: 

Calling all Readers!

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

Check out This Resource for Native Youth Research!

 

 Tips for Researchers: Strengthening Research that Benefits Native Youth

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Policy Research Center invited several distinguished scholars to share their best practices to identify key aspects of ethics and process in research developed with and for Native youth.

The report is designed to guide efforts to include American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth in research, so that the research generates the maximum benefit for AI/AN youth and their communities, and importantly, does no harm. It offers some broad insights in five key areas, or “Tips”, in the hopes that this can be tool for communities of researchers, youth, and youth advocates to come together around and use to develop context-specific discussions and partnered research goals. The five key areas with lead author annotations include the following:

  1. Centering Youth Voices (Greg Tafoya)
  2. Engaging Tribal Communities (Catherine Burnette)
  3. The Power of Place-Based, Small-Scale Inquiry (Tarajean Yazzie-Mintz)
  4. Expanding Tribal Youth Research in Urban and National Settings (Michelle Sarche)
  5. Ethical Considerations (Deana Around Him)

View the Report here (PDF)

NCAI Policy Research Center. (2016). Tips for Researchers: Native Youth Research. Author: Washington, DC.

Evaluation Conference begins Tomorrow!

¡MilwaukeeEvaluation¡ Social Justice & Evaluation conference starts tomorrow, March 2, 2017 here in Madison. The event promises great opportunity to explore social justice as it relates to evaluation practice, all in community with evaluators from around the state.

*Click to view the flyer (PDF)

Visit http://evaluation.wildapricot.org/ for more information!

Tribal Roadmap

A ROADMAP FOR COLLABORATIVE AND EFFECTIVE EVALUATION IN TRIBAL COMMUNITIES (click for PDF)

Executive Summary

Many Tribal* communities feel the impact of intergenerational trauma as a result of the experiences of prior generations exposed to adverse and devastating events and conditions. Tribal communities can recount negative experiences that have created a distrust of research and evaluation. Evaluation activities have generally been imposed on Native communities by funding agencies that view evaluation from the dominant cultural paradigm. These approaches often failed to recognize the sovereignty of Tribes and to take advantage of long traditions of successful evaluation strategies that draw on indigenous practice. Research was often invasive and offered little benefit to the community. In some cases, research actually harmed and exploited Native culture and ignored community rights. These experiences have contributed to a fear of evaluation in Tribal communities – fear of doing an evaluation and fear of being evaluated. Evaluation efforts are often met with fearful reluctance or outright refusal. To address these challenges with respect to child welfare, the Children’s Bureau formed a workgroup comprising representatives from Tribal child welfare programs, evaluators, university researchers, technical assistance providers, and Federal program partners. The workgroup developed this Roadmap for Co-Creating Collaborative & Effective Evaluation To Improve Tribal Child Welfare Programs. This tool can be used to create a shared vision for the future of Tribal child welfare evaluation and provide a common language for Tribal communities and evaluators as they improve evaluation practice.

Register now for ¡MilwaukeeEvaluation¡

See the link below for a save-the-date for the ¡MilwaukeeEvaluation¡ Social Justice & Evaluation conference coming up March 2, 2017 here in Madison. More details will follow, but the event promises great opportunity to explore social justice as it relates to evaluation practice, all in community with evaluators from around the state. 

Students may be especially interested in participating in the new student poster session. Abstracts will be due Feb. 3, 2017.

*Click to view the flyer (PDF)

Visit http://evaluation.wildapricot.org/ for updates!

Eval Reads

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

new book pic

“Racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity has become of global importance in places where many never would have imagined. Increasing diversity in the U.S., Europe, Africa, New Zealand, and Asia strongly suggests that a homogeneity-based focus is rapidly becoming an historical artifact. Therefore, culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) should no longer be viewed as a luxury or an option in our work as evaluators. The continued amplification of racial, ethnic, linguistic, and cultural diversity and awareness among the populations of the U.S. and other western nations insists that social science researchers and evaluators inextricably engage culturally responsive approaches in their work. It is unacceptable for most mainstream university evaluation programs, philanthropic agencies, training institutes sponsored by federal agencies, professional associations, and other entities to promote professional evaluation practices that do not attend to CRE. Our global demographics are a reality that can be appropriately described and studied within the context of complexity theory and theory of change (e.g., Stewart, 1991; Battram, 1999). And this perspective requires a distinct shift from “simple” linear cause-effect models and reductionist thinking to include more holistic and culturally responsive approaches.

The development of policy that is meaningfully responsive to the needs of traditionally disenfranchised stakeholders and that also optimizes the use of limited resources (human, natural, and financial) is an extremely complex process. Fortunately, we are presently witnessing developments in methods, instruments, and statistical techniques that are mixed methods in their paradigm/designs and likely to be more effective in informing policymaking and decision-making. Culturally responsive evaluation is one such phenomenon that positions itself to be relevant in the context of dynamic international and national settings where policy and program decisions take place. One example of a response to address this dynamic and need is the newly established Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) in the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

CREA is an outgrowth of the collective work and commitments of a global community of scholars and practitioners who have contributed chapters to this edited volume. It is an international and interdisciplinary evaluation center that is grounded in the need for designing and conducting evaluations and assessments that embody cognitive, cultural, and interdisciplinary diversity so as to be actively responsive to culturally diverse communities and their aspirations. The Center’s purpose is to address questions, issues, theories, and practices related to CRE and culturally responsive educational assessment. Therefore, CREA can serve as a vehicle for our continuing discourse on culture and cultural context in evaluation and also as a point of dissemination for not only the work that is included in this edited volume, but for the subsequent work it will encourage.

CONTENTS
Introduction: This Is Where We Continue to Stand, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson. SECTION I: CRE THEORETICAL AND HISTORICAL LEGACIES AND EXTENSIONS. Culturally Responsive Theory-Driven Evaluation, Katrina L. Bledsoe and Stewart I. Donaldson. A Systems Approach to Culturally Responsive Evaluation Practice: Culturally Responsive Uses of the Systems Evaluation Protocol (SEP), Wanda D. Casillas and William M. Trochim. Cultural Views of Validity: A Conversation, Joan LaFrance, Karen E. Kirkhart, and Richard Nichols. An Analysis of Love My Children: Rose Butler Browne’s Contributions to Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Pamela Frazier-Anderson and Tamara Bertrand Jones. SECTION II: EVALUATORS’ JOURNEYS OF INTROSPECTION AND SELF-EXPLORATION. Culture and Evaluation: From a Transcultural Belvedere, Jennifer C. Greene. Culturally Responsive Evaluation as a Resource for Helpful-Help, Hazel Symonette. Peeling Open the Kiwi: Reterritorializing (Pākehā/White) Evaluation in Aotearoa New Zealand, Rae Torrie, Mathea Roorda, Robin Peace, Mark Dalgety, and Robyn Bailey. Beginning a Conversation About Spirituality in Māori and Pasifika Evaluation, Vivienne Kennedy, Fiona Cram, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, Maria Baker, Laurie Porima, Pale Sauni and Clark Tuagalu. Cultural Reactivity vs. Cultural Responsiveness: Addressing Macro Issues Starting With Micro Changes in Evaluation, Dominica McBride. SECTION III: APPLICATIONS OF CRE IN GLOBAL AND INDIGENOUS SCHOOL CONTEXTS. Culture Changes, Irish Evaluation and Assessment Traditions Stay the Same? Exploring Peer- and Self-Assessment as a Means of Empowering Ethnic Minority Students, Joe O’Hara, Gerry McNamara, Kathy Harrison. Implementing Culturally Sensitive Assessment Tools for the Inclusion Of Roma Children in Mainstream Schools,S. Mitakidou, E. Tressou, and P. Karagianni. Evaluating Alch’i’ni Ba/For the Children: The Troubled Cultural Work of an Indigenous Teacher Education Project, Carolyne J. White and Guy Senese. SECTION IV: CLAIMING NEW TERRITORIES OF CRE: CULTURALLY SPECIFIC METHODS, APPROACHES, AND ECOLOGIES. A Transformative Framework for Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Donna M. Mertens and Heather Zimmerman. Being Culturally Responsive Through Kaupapa Māori Evaluation, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, Kirimatao Paipa, Kataraina Pipi, and Nan Wehipeihana. Culturally Responsive Methods for Family Centered Evaluation, Kirimatao Paipa, Fiona Cram, Vivienne Kennedy, and Kataraina Pipi. Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation: A Practical Approach for Evaluating Indigenous Projects in Tribal Reservation Contexts, Nicole R. Bowman, Carolee Dodge Francis, and Monique Tyndall. Partnering with Pacific Communities to Ground Evaluation in Local Culture and Context: Promises and Challenges, Joan LaFrance, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Elizabeth D. Rechebei, and Janet Gordon.Epilogue: Toward the Next Generation and New Possibilities of Culturally Responsive Evaluation, Stafford Hood, Rodney Hopson, and Henry Frierson.”

http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Continuing-the-Journey-to-Reposition-Culture-and-Cultural-Context-in-Evaluation-Theory-and-Practice

Read More in 2017

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!

2016 Year in Review

#HappyNewYear from #BPC! Koolamalsi njoos wuk niiallogamaatit ! Wuli wulahkameew wulahlokayaan wuk wulakkuniimeew!

This is my humble attempt in my Original language (Lunaape-Munsee dialect) to say, “Hello Greetings colleagues, relatives, and friends! It is a beautiful and good day to do good work and say good things!”

BPC’s 2016 has been a bountiful year for us and without the help of many we wouldn’t continue to be successful, have such a good time, learned so much, and helped to support/empower the communities, people, projects, and partners we’re so blessed to collaborate with.

Forgive me if I’ve missed anyone in the video. Hopefully we’ve expressed our gratitude many times and in many ways in 2016. It is with happiness we reflect on our 2016 and look forward to the seeds lovingly planted which will grow in 2017.

#BPC #BeTheChange #SocialJusticeInAction