Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Associate Dean and Director Native American Cultural Center position at Stanford

*Please do not contact BPC about this position. See contact info and details below or visit the listing online.
Associate Dean and Director, Native American Cultural Center  76223
Description

 

If you are ready to work for an organization that nurtures diversity, respect within the American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Pacific Islander students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, we invite you to explore this opportunity and apply online for the position of Associate Dean and Director of the Native American Cultural Center, a unit of the Division of Student Affairs.
The Native American Cultural Center is proud to be part of Student Affairs, which advances student development and learning; fosters community engagement; promotes diversity, inclusion and respect; and empowers students to thrive.
JOB PURPOSE:
 
The Associate Dean and Director of the Native American Cultural Center (NACC) is the chief administrator for NACC at Stanford.  The Director provides strategy, vision and direction regarding issues and objectives impacting NACC as part of the student services/affairs organization.  Primary responsibilities include strategic planning and assessment and conceptualizing and implementing policies, professional services, resources and programs that address identified concerns and needs of the community.  The Associate Dean and Director must also be attuned to the dynamics between the individual, the institution, and the home environment of students.
 
Liaise with senior management and cross functional areas and schools to implement this vision and strategy. The Associate Dean and Director of the NACC is the primary conduit between and among university offices and departments with particular attention to the American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Pacific Islander community, both undergraduate and graduate. Manage the work of other employees, including managers.
 
CORE DUTIES:
  • Manage the work of managers and other employees, processes, and projects, to implement the strategic goals of the unit, department, or school. Make hiring decisions, provide coaching and mentoring, and manage performance and staffing levels.
    • Supervise the Center’s two professional and, in conjunction with the Associate Directors, the student staff
    • Responsible for hiring, training, goal setting, performance management/reviews, compensation planning, and terminations.
  • Crisis prevention and intervention: conduct counseling, intervention and referral when necessary to assist students in resolving personal/academic problems and crises; collaborate with other university offices, such as Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and Residence Deans when necessary; develop appropriate outreach, education and programming to proactively address unique mental health and wellness issues affecting Native students.
  • Identify, clarify, and resolve complex issues with university­wide scope and impact and substantial significance which may span multiple areas, using advanced technical and professional knowledge requiring broad discretion and judgment.
    • Participate in the development and implementation of university policies to ensure student success, e.g. mental health, well-being, academic success, retention and graduation.
    • Serve on University committees such as the mental health task force subcommittee and other division committees.
  • Provide strategic direction for and manage the Center, including forecasting, planning, and managing program budgets. 
    • Develop, implement and manage long-range budget and strategic plans;
  • Develop, analyze, measure effectiveness and oversee programs and tools for delivery of student services or programs.
    • Provide individual advising to students on issues that include academics, career paths, internships, conflict resolution and personal matters.
    • Conceptualize, develop and implement quality student programs designed to promote student’s educational, social, cultural and leadership goals.
    • Advise and train students and student organizations in event planning, organizational development and conflict resolution.
  • Review exceptions to university, program or unit policies and procedures, settle grievances. 
  • Manage the direction of internal administrative policy development for programs and operations. May serve as senior advisor to dean on programmatic and policy development.
  • Interpret, implement and ensure compliance with university, academic and administrative policies within Student Affairs and NACC. Recommend new internal policies, guidelines and procedures. Direct process improvement.
  • Lead university­ or school­wide initiatives and campaigns; develop long range planning and policy development.
  • Represent department programs and initiatives at senior level meetings, conferences, and to both internal and external constituents. 
    • Participate in Vice Provost for Student Affairs divisional meetings and development activities and complete special projects as assigned.
  • Evaluate and recommend the technological needs and effectiveness for delivery of student programs and services
  • Identify, manage relationships, and negotiate with external and internal partners.
    • Collaborate with other community centers, programs and departments to develop and implement multicultural student leadership training.
    • Collaborate with other offices to impact the quality of undergraduate and graduate student life, including CAPS, Graduate Life Office, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Vice Provost for Graduate Education, Diversity & First Generation, Admissions, Stanford Alumni Association, schools & academic departments.
    • Maintain communication and collaborations with faculty, staff, alumni and other programs.  Involve them in center programming; assist in making connections with students.
Note: Not all unique aspects of the job are covered by this job description
Qualifications

 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 
 
Education & Experience:
Bachelor’s degree and eight years of relevant experience, or combination of education and relevant experience. Experience in higher education setting preferred.
 
Education & Experience:
  • User knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Advanced communication skills to clearly and effectively communicate information to internal and external audiences, client groups, and all levels of management.
  • Strong analytical skills to review and analyze complex financial information. Strong leadership and strategic management skills.
  • Demonstrated experience managing people.
  • Understanding of underlying technological needs and requirements. Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively.
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS*:
  • Frequently sit, perform desk­based computer tasks.
  • Occasionally stand, walk, twist, use fine manipulation, grasp, use a telephone, write by hand, sort and file paperwork, lift, carry, push, and pull objects that weigh up to 10 pounds.
* ­ Consistent with its obligations under the law, the University will provide reasonable accommodation to any employee with a disability who requires accommodation to perform the essential functions of his or her job
 
WORK STANDARDS:
  • Interpersonal Skills: Demonstrates the ability to work well with Stanford colleagues and clients and with external organizations.
  • Promote Culture of Safety: Demonstrates commitment to personal responsibility and value for safety; communicates safety concerns; uses and promotes safe behaviors based on training and lessons learned. Subject to and expected to comply with all applicable University policies and procedures, including but not limited to the personnel policies and other policies found in the University’s Administrative Guide, http://adminguide.stanford.edu/.
 
About NACC:
 
The mission of the Native American Cultural Center (NACC) is to create an environment of support for the American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Island undergraduate and graduate student population at Stanford, guided by the principle that students succeed where there is support for that success.  
 
NACC’s educational mission complements and enhances students’ learning and thriving at Stanford, based on active collaboration with academic and Student Affairs partners, alumni, and the tribal community beyond.  NACC strives to foster adaptive learning and community based learning models and experiences. 
 
Leadership development, counseling, advising, mentoring, academic support, intellectual and cultural programming, professional guidance, and service to campus and community are all venues to promote a sense of belonging or community, student wellness, retention, graduation, and preparation for global citizenship.  
 
NACC is a resource center and clearinghouse for Native issues, opportunities and programs to the campus community, potential students, families, scholars, tribal leaders, and other visitors. NACC staff are institutional border crossers who facilitate dialogues and strategic partnerships among multiple stakeholders.
 
NACC is committed to meeting student needs and challenges through innovative programs, resource development and campus partnerships.  It offers a range of services for both undergraduate and graduate students and has a solid reputation for nurturing student, faculty and staff initiatives.  
 
Programs and services of Native American Cultural Center are aligned with the Aims of a Stanford Education and provide students with various opportunities to own knowledge, hone skills and competencies, cultivate personal and social responsibility and participate in adaptive learning.
 
Experience a culture of excellence
 
Stanford University, located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, is one of the world’s leading teaching and research universities. Since its opening in 1891, Stanford has been dedicated to finding solutions to big challenges and to preparing students for leadership in a complex world. 
 
Supporting that mission is a staff of more than 10,000, which is rooted in a culture of excellence and values innovation, collaboration, and life-long learning. To foster the talents and aspirations of our staff, Stanford offers career development programs, competitive pay that reflects market trends and benefits that increase financial stability and promote healthy, fulfilling lives. An award-winning employer, Stanford offers an exceptional setting for professionals looking to advance their careers. 
Stanford is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.
Finalist candidate must successfully pass a pre-employment background check.

Job

: Student Services

Location

: Vice Provost for Student Affairs

Schedule

: Full-time

Grade: K
Job Code: 7507

Apply Online!

Article: Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion

Congrats to Martin Reinhardt on publishing “Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion!”

Abstract: In 2016, Dr. Martin Reinhardt and Dr. Jioanna Carjuzaa produced a series of three webinars concerning Indigenous language immersion programs. The first webinar focused on broad curriculum development ideas including core relationships, guidelines and principles for effective pedagogy, and models. The second webinar focused on the elements of lesson planning. The third and last webinar focused on assessments and the use of rubrics aligned with Indigenous language standards. The content of the webinars has been transposed into the following chapter with certain modifications.

Subjects: Education; Education Studies; Multicultural Education; Curriculum Studies

Read the full article online!

Free! AIGC Journey to College Turtle Map

The turtle is seen as strength and solidarity, is old, wise, well respected and teaches us patience and never to give up.

Order free maps online here: http://www.aigcs.org/aigc-publications/aigc-journey-to-college-turtle-map/

American Indian Science & Engineering Society Opportunity for STEM students

Apply for the 4th “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” cohort! 

In 2014, AISES was awarded a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create the “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” program. The program’s goal is to increase the representation of American Indians, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty positions at universities and tribal colleges across the country. The program aims to create an intergenerational community of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and junior and senior faculty members.

This full circle of support will help guide students to successful degree completion and advancement to the next stage on the academic career path. In addition to full circle mentorship, the program strives to provide students with valuable academic and professional support, travel funding, and educational, research, fellowship, and internship opportunities.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Full time undergraduate student, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar in a field within Biological Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Geosciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, STEM Education, or Engineering at an accredited four-year college/university or two-year college. Must be enrolled in a program leading to an academic degree.
  • Interest in becoming a faculty member at a college, university, or tribal college.
  • Have a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or higher cumulative grade point average (GPA), with consideration being given to applicants reflecting somewhat lower GPAs but with high potential to raise the GPA above 3.0.
  • Current member of AISES.

Selection of students will seek balance with respect to a diversity of tribes, geographic areas in the United States, STEM majors, and gender. While the focus is primarily on American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and Native Hawaiians, all AISES members are eligible. The selection process will attempt to ensure that a diversity of STEM disciplines is reflected.

Scholars in the program will receive an annual participation stipend of $2,250 for two years, and two years of travel funding to attend the AISES National Conference and AISES Leadership Summit or discipline-specific professional conference. Scholars will be matched with an AISES selected faculty mentor to interact with at least monthly.  Scholars are required to participate in skill-building, professional-development in-person programming and webinars. Finally, scholars will have the opportunity to engage in an active community of Native STEM researchers.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

  • You must be either an undergraduate student, graduate student, or post-doctoral fellow to apply.
  • Complete the “Lighting the Pathway” application online:http://www.aises.org/content/lighting-pathway
  • Submit the following supporting documents to bhall@aises.org:
    • Unofficial transcript(s)
    • CV/Resume
    • One Letter of Recommendation
  • All applications and supporting documents must be received by July 24, 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact Kathy DeerInWater at kdeerinwater@aises.orgor 720-552-6123 ext. 107.

BEGIN APPLICATION

2018 Ford Foundation Fellowship Programs

Competition Deadlines:

2018 Predoctoral application deadline is: December 14, 2017 (5:00 PM EST)

2018 Dissertation and Postdoctoral application deadlines are: December 7, 2017 (5:00 PM EST)

Supplementary Materials receipt deadline for submitted applications is: January 9, 2018 (5:00 PM EST)

Through its Fellowship Programs, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

Predoctoral, Dissertation, and Postdoctoral fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on behalf of the Ford Foundation.

Eligibility to apply for a Ford fellowship is limited to:

  • All U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, and U.S. permanent residents (holders of a Permanent Resident Card), as well as individuals granted deferred action status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, regardless of race, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation,
  • Individuals with evidence of superior academic achievement (such as grade point average, class rank, honors or other designations), and
  • Individuals committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level.

First Cohort of Native Students to Graduate From UW Madison College Pipeline Program

Tacked to the wall of his bedroom on the Oneida Indian Reservation is evidence of how hard Michael Williams worked as a high school student — an acceptance letter to Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

But the real prize, the acceptance letter to UW–Madison, his dream school, travels with him in his backpack, always within reach.

Growing up, Williams, 18, says he watched too many young people flounder in their attempts to leave the reservation and find opportunities elsewhere. He was determined not to be one of them.

“I’ve always wanted to further my education,” he says. “The more I know, the better I feel personally. And I think college is the step to a successful job and a secure future.”

Williams participated in an extensive college pipeline program sponsored by UW–Madison for students from tribal communities. It is a new component of a long-running UW diversity initiative called the Information Technology Academy. The first cohort of 10 Native students, including Williams, is graduating from the program this spring and will be in Madison June 3 for a ceremony marking the occasion.

“The program changed my life,” says Williams, who plans to begin classes at UW–Madison this fall.

He had always hoped to attend college, he says, but UW had not been on his radar prior to the program. During a trip to Madison, he was captivated by the urban environment and found everything on the campus “new and exotic.” He could picture himself among the student body.

“I especially like the idea of walking to class every day and running into friends and new strangers,” says Williams, who has always traveled to school by bus or car. “It’ll be an experience I’ve never had before.”

The initiative is one of the most direct ways university administrators are trying to increase enrollment of American Indian students, currently estimated at just under 1 percent of 43,336 students.

A little background: The Academic Technology Department of the UW’s Division of Information Technology created the Information Technology Academy (ITA) 17 years ago. There are now three programs under its umbrella. All work to increase the number of students of color at UW–Madison and in the field of information technology — two areas where historically they’ve been underrepresented.

ITA Madison, the original program, began in 2000 and works with students from Madison public schools. Three years ago, the tribal component was added to more explicitly recruit American Indian students. It is called ITA’s Tribal Technology Institute and serves two communities: the Oneida Nation near Green Bay and the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin.

View entire article here

Connections That Create Health, Wellness and Security

At the heart of Iḷisaġvik College’s Restorative Teachings project is the desire to nurture and support meaningful connections between early childhood students, their families, and the community as a whole. It is through these connections that knowledge of language and culture, love, respect, and compassion are passed from one generation to the next.For the Iñupiat, an ancient people who have inhabited the northern regions of Alaska for thousands of years, potlucks are an opportunity to build and maintain strong connections.It is a time to gather with friends and kin, share highly prized subsistence foods, and revel in aġġi, the holding of traditional drumming and dancing, which are always accompanied by warm conversation and laughter.

On a cold, dark winter afternoon in Utqiaġvik (Barrow, Alaska), the staff of Uqautchim Uglua Learning Center escorted nine of their two- and three-year-old children and 14 family members to Aimaaġvik Assisted Living Center to celebrate the season with a potluck held for the elder residents. Aimaaġvik, loosely translated as “a place for home,” is one of Uqautchim Uglua’s community partners, along with its parent organization the Arctic Slope Native Association (ASNA). Joining the celebration were staff members from Aimaaġvik, representatives from ASNA, and members of Iḷisaġvik College administration including Iḷisaġvik College President Pearl Brower. Forty-five participants celebrated and shared the abundance of locally harvested foods such as tuttu (caribou), maktak (bowhead whale blubber), pivsi (dried fish), and aġvik quaq (frozen raw whale meat).

The cooperation of many hearts and hands contributed to the success of the potluck. Because of the community members’ compassion and willingness to share, this gathering created meaningful connections across generations. From the sounds of children laughing to the Iñupiaq language flowing from elders, it is these connections that are necessary for true health, wellness and security.

During subsequent visits, the children of Uqautchim Uglua Learning Center returned to Aimaaġvik Assisted Living Center to entertain the elders with holiday songs and traditional dancing. In January 2017, they also returned to celebrate and welcome the New Year with their “adopted” aakas and aapas (grandparents) from Aimaaġvik.

by Kimberlee Brent, Iḷisaġvik College, Assistant Professor of Education, and Heidi Ahsoak, Uqautchim Uglua Learning Center, Center Manager

 

 

My Journey as an Aspiring Culturally Responsive Evaluator with Stafford Hood!

My Journey as an Aspiring

Culturally Responsive Evaluator

Stafford Hood

Professor, Curriculum & Instruction University of Illinois
College of Education

Graduate student brown bag (i.e., bring your own lunch)
Friday, April 7, 2016 • Noon – 1:30 pm
UW Madison, Ed Sciences Building, Room 259, 1025 West Johnson Street

Sponsored by: 

Stafford Hood Presents… Carl A. Grant Scholars Lecture Series 2016-2017

Dr. Stafford Hood is lecturing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 6-7, 2017.

Come join us and hear about culturally responsive assessment and evaluation from one of the nation’s leading subject matter experts!  A lecture and brown bag provide opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to interact and visit with this warm, down to earth, and humble social justice scholar warrior.

As part of UW’s Carl A. Grant lecture series, Dr. Hood’s scholarly storytelling will provide a historical and practical way to understand and improve professional practice in this area.   “Continuing the Untold Legacy of African Americans in the History of American Evaluation: Another Installment in the Nobody Knows My Name Project” is Professor Hood’s research which continues to strongly influence the field of culturally responsive evaluation in education.

Dr. Hood is a recent American Evaluation Association Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory awardee, the Founder/Director of the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment, and Faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Continuing the Untold Legacy of African Americans in the History of American Evaluation: Another Installment in the Nobody Knows My Name Project

Professor Hood’s research has influenced the field of culturally responsive evaluation in education by extending the logic of cultural responsiveness from pedagogy and educational assessment to evaluation. His work provided the historical framework that created a bridge between culturally responsive assessment to culturally responsive evaluation.

Presented By:

Stafford Hood, Sheila M. Miller Professor

Professor, Curriculum & Instruction and Ed. Psychology

Founding Director, Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation & Assessment (CREA)

College of Education University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Thursday, April 6, 2017, Noon-1 pm University of Wisconsin – Madison, Ed Sciences Building, Room 259 1025 West Johnson Street