American Indian Science & Engineering Society Opportunity for STEM students

Apply for the 4th “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” cohort! 

In 2014, AISES was awarded a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create the “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” program. The program’s goal is to increase the representation of American Indians, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty positions at universities and tribal colleges across the country. The program aims to create an intergenerational community of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and junior and senior faculty members.

This full circle of support will help guide students to successful degree completion and advancement to the next stage on the academic career path. In addition to full circle mentorship, the program strives to provide students with valuable academic and professional support, travel funding, and educational, research, fellowship, and internship opportunities.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Full time undergraduate student, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar in a field within Biological Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Geosciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, STEM Education, or Engineering at an accredited four-year college/university or two-year college. Must be enrolled in a program leading to an academic degree.
  • Interest in becoming a faculty member at a college, university, or tribal college.
  • Have a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or higher cumulative grade point average (GPA), with consideration being given to applicants reflecting somewhat lower GPAs but with high potential to raise the GPA above 3.0.
  • Current member of AISES.

Selection of students will seek balance with respect to a diversity of tribes, geographic areas in the United States, STEM majors, and gender. While the focus is primarily on American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and Native Hawaiians, all AISES members are eligible. The selection process will attempt to ensure that a diversity of STEM disciplines is reflected.

Scholars in the program will receive an annual participation stipend of $2,250 for two years, and two years of travel funding to attend the AISES National Conference and AISES Leadership Summit or discipline-specific professional conference. Scholars will be matched with an AISES selected faculty mentor to interact with at least monthly.  Scholars are required to participate in skill-building, professional-development in-person programming and webinars. Finally, scholars will have the opportunity to engage in an active community of Native STEM researchers.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

  • You must be either an undergraduate student, graduate student, or post-doctoral fellow to apply.
  • Complete the “Lighting the Pathway” application online:http://www.aises.org/content/lighting-pathway
  • Submit the following supporting documents to bhall@aises.org:
    • Unofficial transcript(s)
    • CV/Resume
    • One Letter of Recommendation
  • All applications and supporting documents must be received by July 24, 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact Kathy DeerInWater at kdeerinwater@aises.orgor 720-552-6123 ext. 107.

BEGIN APPLICATION

2018 Ford Foundation Fellowship Programs

Competition Deadlines:

2018 Predoctoral application deadline is: December 14, 2017 (5:00 PM EST)

2018 Dissertation and Postdoctoral application deadlines are: December 7, 2017 (5:00 PM EST)

Supplementary Materials receipt deadline for submitted applications is: January 9, 2018 (5:00 PM EST)

Through its Fellowship Programs, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

Predoctoral, Dissertation, and Postdoctoral fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on behalf of the Ford Foundation.

Eligibility to apply for a Ford fellowship is limited to:

  • All U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, and U.S. permanent residents (holders of a Permanent Resident Card), as well as individuals granted deferred action status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, regardless of race, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation,
  • Individuals with evidence of superior academic achievement (such as grade point average, class rank, honors or other designations), and
  • Individuals committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level.

First Cohort of Native Students to Graduate From UW Madison College Pipeline Program

Tacked to the wall of his bedroom on the Oneida Indian Reservation is evidence of how hard Michael Williams worked as a high school student — an acceptance letter to Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

But the real prize, the acceptance letter to UW–Madison, his dream school, travels with him in his backpack, always within reach.

Growing up, Williams, 18, says he watched too many young people flounder in their attempts to leave the reservation and find opportunities elsewhere. He was determined not to be one of them.

“I’ve always wanted to further my education,” he says. “The more I know, the better I feel personally. And I think college is the step to a successful job and a secure future.”

Williams participated in an extensive college pipeline program sponsored by UW–Madison for students from tribal communities. It is a new component of a long-running UW diversity initiative called the Information Technology Academy. The first cohort of 10 Native students, including Williams, is graduating from the program this spring and will be in Madison June 3 for a ceremony marking the occasion.

“The program changed my life,” says Williams, who plans to begin classes at UW–Madison this fall.

He had always hoped to attend college, he says, but UW had not been on his radar prior to the program. During a trip to Madison, he was captivated by the urban environment and found everything on the campus “new and exotic.” He could picture himself among the student body.

“I especially like the idea of walking to class every day and running into friends and new strangers,” says Williams, who has always traveled to school by bus or car. “It’ll be an experience I’ve never had before.”

The initiative is one of the most direct ways university administrators are trying to increase enrollment of American Indian students, currently estimated at just under 1 percent of 43,336 students.

A little background: The Academic Technology Department of the UW’s Division of Information Technology created the Information Technology Academy (ITA) 17 years ago. There are now three programs under its umbrella. All work to increase the number of students of color at UW–Madison and in the field of information technology — two areas where historically they’ve been underrepresented.

ITA Madison, the original program, began in 2000 and works with students from Madison public schools. Three years ago, the tribal component was added to more explicitly recruit American Indian students. It is called ITA’s Tribal Technology Institute and serves two communities: the Oneida Nation near Green Bay and the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin.

View entire article here

Connections That Create Health, Wellness and Security

At the heart of Iḷisaġvik College’s Restorative Teachings project is the desire to nurture and support meaningful connections between early childhood students, their families, and the community as a whole. It is through these connections that knowledge of language and culture, love, respect, and compassion are passed from one generation to the next.For the Iñupiat, an ancient people who have inhabited the northern regions of Alaska for thousands of years, potlucks are an opportunity to build and maintain strong connections.It is a time to gather with friends and kin, share highly prized subsistence foods, and revel in aġġi, the holding of traditional drumming and dancing, which are always accompanied by warm conversation and laughter.

On a cold, dark winter afternoon in Utqiaġvik (Barrow, Alaska), the staff of Uqautchim Uglua Learning Center escorted nine of their two- and three-year-old children and 14 family members to Aimaaġvik Assisted Living Center to celebrate the season with a potluck held for the elder residents. Aimaaġvik, loosely translated as “a place for home,” is one of Uqautchim Uglua’s community partners, along with its parent organization the Arctic Slope Native Association (ASNA). Joining the celebration were staff members from Aimaaġvik, representatives from ASNA, and members of Iḷisaġvik College administration including Iḷisaġvik College President Pearl Brower. Forty-five participants celebrated and shared the abundance of locally harvested foods such as tuttu (caribou), maktak (bowhead whale blubber), pivsi (dried fish), and aġvik quaq (frozen raw whale meat).

The cooperation of many hearts and hands contributed to the success of the potluck. Because of the community members’ compassion and willingness to share, this gathering created meaningful connections across generations. From the sounds of children laughing to the Iñupiaq language flowing from elders, it is these connections that are necessary for true health, wellness and security.

During subsequent visits, the children of Uqautchim Uglua Learning Center returned to Aimaaġvik Assisted Living Center to entertain the elders with holiday songs and traditional dancing. In January 2017, they also returned to celebrate and welcome the New Year with their “adopted” aakas and aapas (grandparents) from Aimaaġvik.

by Kimberlee Brent, Iḷisaġvik College, Assistant Professor of Education, and Heidi Ahsoak, Uqautchim Uglua Learning Center, Center Manager

 

 

My Journey as an Aspiring Culturally Responsive Evaluator with Stafford Hood!

My Journey as an Aspiring

Culturally Responsive Evaluator

Stafford Hood

Professor, Curriculum & Instruction University of Illinois
College of Education

Graduate student brown bag (i.e., bring your own lunch)
Friday, April 7, 2016 • Noon – 1:30 pm
UW Madison, Ed Sciences Building, Room 259, 1025 West Johnson Street

Sponsored by: 

Stafford Hood Presents… Carl A. Grant Scholars Lecture Series 2016-2017

Dr. Stafford Hood is lecturing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison April 6-7, 2017.

Come join us and hear about culturally responsive assessment and evaluation from one of the nation’s leading subject matter experts!  A lecture and brown bag provide opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to interact and visit with this warm, down to earth, and humble social justice scholar warrior.

As part of UW’s Carl A. Grant lecture series, Dr. Hood’s scholarly storytelling will provide a historical and practical way to understand and improve professional practice in this area.   “Continuing the Untold Legacy of African Americans in the History of American Evaluation: Another Installment in the Nobody Knows My Name Project” is Professor Hood’s research which continues to strongly influence the field of culturally responsive evaluation in education.

Dr. Hood is a recent American Evaluation Association Lazarsfeld Evaluation Theory awardee, the Founder/Director of the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment, and Faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Continuing the Untold Legacy of African Americans in the History of American Evaluation: Another Installment in the Nobody Knows My Name Project

Professor Hood’s research has influenced the field of culturally responsive evaluation in education by extending the logic of cultural responsiveness from pedagogy and educational assessment to evaluation. His work provided the historical framework that created a bridge between culturally responsive assessment to culturally responsive evaluation.

Presented By:

Stafford Hood, Sheila M. Miller Professor

Professor, Curriculum & Instruction and Ed. Psychology

Founding Director, Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation & Assessment (CREA)

College of Education University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Thursday, April 6, 2017, Noon-1 pm University of Wisconsin – Madison, Ed Sciences Building, Room 259 1025 West Johnson Street

WIEA is in May!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!

Future Services Institute at the University of Minnesota Has New Opportunity

The Future Services Institute is seeking an individual to act as a project manager and become a key resource in the development of a Tribal/Urban American Indian Workforce Strategy. The project will target the engagement of representatives from Tribal governments, urban Indian community and the Department of Human Services and the Department of Employment and Economic Development. The focus will be on creating quality employment services that will support the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)/Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP), and Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) programs. At the same time, the goal is to develop a comprehensive employment service matrix that includes other key tribal programs such as Tribal 477 programs and Tribal Employment Rights Office (TERO).
The goal is to align employment training services and to increase employment opportunities within tribal and urban Indian communities within Minnesota. This project is facilitated by the Future Services Institute (FSI) http://futureservicesinstitute.umn.edu/), within the Humphrey School of Public Affairs and University of Minnesota, and is funded by MN Department of Human Services.

Grant Opportunity – Native Youth Initiative for Leadership, Empowerment, and Development

The Administration for Native Americans (ANA), within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), announces the availability of Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 funds for the Native Youth I-LEAD. This program will emphasize a comprehensive, culturally-appropriate approach to ensure that all young Native people can thrive and reach their full potential by fostering Native youth resilience, capacity building, and leadership. Native Youth I-LEAD will specifically focus on implementation of community programs that promote Native youth resiliency and foster protective factors such as connections with Native languages and Elders, positive peer groups, culturally-responsive parenting resources, models of safe sanctuary, and reconnection with traditional healing. Projects will also promote Native youth leadership development through the establishment of local models to instill confidence in Native youth of their value and potential, preparation of older youth to be role models for younger peers, and activities that foster leadership and skills-building. In addition, it is intended that Native youth must be actively involved during the planning and implementation phases of the projects to ensure that they are responsive to the needs of Native youth in the communities to be served and to ensure that youth remain engaged throughout the project period. DUE: May 22

 

https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=290439&utm_source=phplist446&utm_medium=email&utm_content=HTML&utm_campaign=Funding+Opportunities%3A+Native+Youth+Initiative+for+Leadership%2C+Empowerment%2C+and+Development+%28I-LEAD%29+Department+of+Health+and+Human+Services

Register for Let’s Be Healthy Together!

The 2017 Wisconsin Indian Education Association Conference titled, MINO-AYAA ‘IDIIWIN: Let’s Be Healthy Together, will be hosted by WIEA’s Northeast Region and is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, May 12 and 13, 2017, at The Waters of Minocqua in beautiful Minocqua, WI. The conference includes events at Lakeland Union High School in Minocqua and Lake of the Torches Resort Convention Center in Lac du Flambeau, WI.

The 2017 Conference includes early extended programming thanks in part to a partnership between The Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network or “The Network”, which is a multi-tiered system of compliance activities and improvement supports to address racial disproportionality in special education and the Wisconsin Indian Education Association. On May 11, The Network will hold a training workshop at The Pointe Hotel in Minocqua.

Register Now!