Today on Native America Calling!

Thursday November 23, 2017 – Indigenous Comic Con re-broadcast 

We’re going to revisit one of our favorite recent shows from the Indigenous Comic Con.  The event at Isleta Resort and Casino was a successful gathering of Native comic book creators, filmmakers, authors, artists and enthusiasts. Our live broadcast from the con touched in with comic book creators about why telling Native stories through action-packed sagas is important.

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

2018 NEA ESP Conference

March 23-25, 2018



Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista
1751 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
(407) 827-4000

General Registration Information

CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION

The NEA ESP conference is the premier professional development opportunity for Education Support Professionals across the nation. The goal of this conference is to enhance the skills and knowledge of ESP members to positively impact student achievement, build community relations, organize members, advocate for educators, build stronger locals, and help our members do their jobs better. The conference offers more than 60 different hands-on workshops over the course of four days. Pre-Conference workshop opportunities are offered in topics ranging from social justice, early career educators, leadership development, team building and school climate.

See the 2017 program…

How To Register

Online Registration

  • Online registration for the 2018 NEA ESP Conference is now open. Click the Register Now icon above and reserve your space today!

On-site Registration

  • On-site registration will be made available for all participants until full capacity is reached.
  • Personal checks will NOT be accepted on-site.
  • Pre-conference workshops are on a first-come, first-served basis. Some pre-conference workshops may be filled to capacity at the time of on-site registration and will not be available.

Terms

  • Registration is accepted on a full-payment, first-come, first-served basis only.
  • Personal checks will not be accepted as a form of payment.

Registration Fees and Refunds

NEA ESP Conference registration fees are as follows:

NEA Member Pre-Conference Participant Registrants (Thursday-Sunday): $250

  • Includes breakfast and lunch during pre-conference session days
  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, awards dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Non-Member Pre-Conference Participant Registrants (Thursday-Sunday): $350

  • Includes breakfast and lunch during pre-conference session days
  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, dinner and entertainment on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

NEA Member Conference Participant Registrants (Friday-Sunday): $200

  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, dinner and entertainment on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Non-member Conference Participant Registrants (Friday-Sunday): $300

  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, awards dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Exhibitor Opportunities: $700

  • Includes booth space from Thursday – Saturday of the conference, all provided conference meals for one person each day.
  • Registration for all exhibitor opportunities are available through online conference registration.
  • Online registration for the 2018 NEA ESP Conference will open in the fall.
  • Sponsorship opportunities are also available. Click here for more information.

NOTE: Online registration will open in the fall. Personal checks will not be accepted as a form of payment.

As a reminder, pre-conference spots are reserved on a first-come, first-served basis. Don’t miss reserving your spot!

Refunds

The deadline to request a 100 percent refund of registration fees is two weeks after online registration closes. Registrants will be eligible to receive a 50 percent refund during the third week after online registration closes. Thereafter, conference registration will be non-refundable.

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Registration Confirmation

CVent, NEA’s online conference registration system, will automatically generate a confirmation number upon completion of your registration. This confirmation number can be found in your confirmation email once you have submitted your registration, as well as in the confirmation page that will appear immediately after submitting your registration. Confirmation numbers are required to make future changes to registration accounts. Please be sure to keep this confirmation number for your records.

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First Timers Session

The NEA ESP Quality Department in the Center for Great Public Schools welcomes all of our first timer registrants to the NEA ESP Conference! We are confident that our programs will include great professional development sessions for you to add to your PD tool box. The NEA ESP Conference provides first timers with a special First Timers Lunch Session, held during on Friday afternoon of each conference weekend. This session is designed to acclimate first time attendees with both the NEA structure, conference structure and networking opportunities. Pre-registration is required once conference registration opens.

Lost, have questions, need one-on-one direction? Visit the conference registration desk. We are happy to assist you!

Hotel Lodging and Transportation

Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista
1751 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
(407) 827-4000

ROOM RATES

To receive the conference rate of $174 per night ($195.75 with tax included), reference the 2018 NEA ESP Conference when making hotel reservations over the phone. Reservations can also be made online by visiting, https://aws.passkey.com/go/2018NEAESPConference.

NOTE: Attendees fully funded by NEA to attend the conference should NOT make their own hotel reservations. Fully funded attendees will be added to the NEA hotel direct bill list via the internal conference registration process. NEA will not reimburse fully funded attendees for independently reserved hotel rooms.

AIRPORT TAXI AND SHUTTLE SERVICES

In an effort to reduce transportation costs, we encourage participants to reserve shuttle services ahead of time or to make arrangements to carpool with colleagues to and from the airport for all conference locations.

Questions or Comments

  • Questions or comments regarding ESP Conference registration should be addressed to Lisa Connor.
  • Questions or comments regarding conference ESP of the Year nominees and state selected Leadership nominees should be directed to Lisa Connor.
  • Inquiries regarding exhibiting at the ESP Conference should be directed to Jessica Brinkley.

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Now Available

2018 Pre-Conference Session Descriptions ( PDF, 3 pgs.)

For Reference

2017 ESP Conference Program  ( PDF, 51 pgs.)

*Join the new NEA ESP Conference online community through NEA edCommunities and become a member of the ESP Conference Group! This group will house real-time conference information, pictures, discussion areas for participants, and more!

*Info from http://www.nea.org/grants/31430.htm

IPE TIG Week: Introduction to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG by Erica Roberts and Nicole Bowman

Erica Roberts

Hello and welcome to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG Week (November 19-24)! I am Erica Blue Roberts, a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, IPE TIG Program Chair, and AEA GEDI alumnus. And I’m Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape) the IPE TIG Chair. As we approach the Colonial celebration and Federal holiday of Thanksgiving, let us reflect on, redefine our understandings, and redirect our behaviors regarding the Original inhabitants of Turtle Island (North America) and Kukuna Auhy (Mother Earth). Together we can move from cultural appropriation and romanticized notions of the first Thanksgiving, to a cultural appreciation for the ongoing contributions by Indigenous people that isn’t limited by a holiday or season.

The IPE TIG was established in 2006 to give voice and recognition to the Indigenous members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and begin to infuse Indigenous evaluation practices into more mainstream evaluation. Indigenous evaluation approaches were developed as culturally-responsive ways of evaluating programs in Indigenous communities. Indigenous evaluation often values and incorporates Indigenous knowledge, recognizes the negative history of evaluation imposed on many Indigenous communities, and respects tribal and data sovereignty. For more information about Indigenous evaluation, look to the work of IPE TIG Founder – Joan France, IPE TIG Founder – Fiona Cram, IPE TIG Chair – Nicky Bowman, and IPE TIG Program Chair – Erica Roberts.

The IPE TIG strives to achieve the following goals to improve evaluation practices and methods:

  • Developing and disseminating knowledge that helps assure that evaluations in which Indigenous people are among the major stakeholders are culturally responsive and respectful of their interests and rights.
  • Creating a venue for Indigenous evaluators and others working in Indigenous contexts to participate in discourse about evaluation models and methods that support Indigenous values, practices, and ways of knowing.
  • Mentoring and emerging evaluators interested in evaluation in various Indigenous contexts.

This week you will get a chance to read about a variety of Indigenous evaluation topics from the TIG Leadership and its members. We chose to blog this week as it is the week of the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when many misconceptions about American Indians and Alaska Natives are shared. We hope that by providing you with an overview of Indigenous evaluation, you may be inspired to look into other ways that Indigenous knowledge can be integrated into mainstream practices and understandings.

Rad Resources:

To learn more about the IPE TIG, please visit our website., become a member, and check us out on Facebook and Twitter.

No More Pranks-Giving:  How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee) Native Appropriations website and blog is an interactive forum for discussing representations and contributions of Native peoples.

Rethinking Schools Blog Archives on “Rethinking Thanksgiving:  Myths and Misgivings

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG week. All posts this week are contributed by members of the IPE Topical Interest Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

*Info originally posted: http://aea365.org/blog/ipe-tig-week-introduction-to-the-indigenous-peoples-in-evaluation-tig-by-erica-roberts-and-nicole-bowman/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+aea365+%28AEA365%29

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEMBER 1, 2017

CONTACT:

Brian Jackson

President

Wisconsin Indian Education Association

Office: (715) 588-3800

Email: brian.jackson@ldfschool.org

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November

Organization issues open Call-to-Action to strengthen relations, address disparities faced by American Indians and ending the use of race based mascots.

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is proud to celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November. On August 3, 1990, President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. The Bill reads in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities.” Every year since, the Office of the President has issued a proclamation supporting the month as such. The landmark Bill honors America’s indigenous people.

In keeping with the essence of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association honors the unique culture, history and perseverance of the 11 federally recognized tribal nations within the state, as well as all Native nations across both North and South America.

WIEA President Brian Jackson says the organization is calling on tribal, state and local governments, public and private schools, tribal education programs and departments and civic groups alike to implement curriculum that strengthen educational offerings about Indigenous peoples in Wisconsin.

“For hundreds of years, American Indian history has been obscured, altered and in many instances erased from existence,” said Jackson. “It has long been a mission of WIEA to educate our non-Indian neighbors to the valuable contributions of Native Americans over the course of American history — many of which have allowed this country to attain a level of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by so many,” added Jackson.

As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is issuing a call to action to address three main areas in closing the cultural divide while increasing the socioeconomic, educational and political position of Wisconsin’s tribal nations:

  • An open challenge to local governments, schools, civic organizations and individuals to learn more about the historical and contemporary connections of your local community to neighboring tribes and tribal communities in general.
  • Request that school districts employing race-based mascots develop an exit strategy away from the use of American Indian or other race based imagery within one (1) year. This request is especially critical if a school within the district you reside or a school within your school’s athletic conference currently uses a race based mascot.
  • Contact your legislator(s) to request a repeal of the 2013 Wisconsin Act 115, which makes it nearly impossible for those who object to race-based mascots and sports team names to bring about change at their school district.

Over the nearly 25-year history of WIEA, the group has remained a catalyst in the effort to incorporate historically accurate Native American curriculum into Wisconsin public schools. The effort gained support when former Governor Jim Doyle (D) signed into law Wisconsin Act 31, which requires public schools to offer historically accurate instruction on American Indian tribes in the state. Act 31 was born as a result of the ugly and sometimes violent protests of the late 80s and early 90s organized by non-Indian groups opposed to Chippewa Treaty Rights. Ultimately, District Judge Barbara Crabb ruled in favor of tribal spearers who sought a permanent injunction prohibiting non-Indian protesters from interfering with their court affirmed Treaty Rights, finding the protests to be racially motivated.

In addition to the call-to-action initiatives, WIEA will participate in a National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots, which is scheduled for Friday, November 17, 2017. Tribes, communities, universities and groups across the country plan to hold local and national events. From documentaries and movie showings, to book readings and workshops, and cultural events, the National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots brings to the forefront the social issues caused by Indian and other race based mascots.

“We’re encouraging everyone to participate in American Indian Heritage Month along with the November 17th National Day-of-Action on Raced Based Mascots,” said Jackson. “We all have a responsibility to add to the quality of life in our respective communities. When we act in the spirit of cooperation and unity, we create the framework for a positive future for people of all races and cultures in Wisconsin and beyond.”

Jackson says that WIEA, along with the Indian Mascot and Logo Task Force, offer a host of educational resources that provide historically accurate, authentic information on Wisconsin’s Native nations. “Much of the general public’s views and misconceptions of American Indians is due to the lack of meaningful information,” said Jackson. “WIEA is open to partnering to provide materials, training, resources and information to any group or organization interesting in broadening their knowledge base on American Indians – that also includes widening their network and fostering positive relationships,” Jackson added.

The American Indian Heritage or Native American Heritage Month designation aims to provide a platform for Native people in the United States to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance and ways and concepts of life. This gives Native people and their allies the opportunity to express to their community, city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and cooperation in their local area.

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For additional resources visit any one of the following websites:

www.indianmascots.com

www.wiea.org

www.wisconsinact31.org

www.dpi.wi.gov/amind/state-statues

About the Wisconsin Indian Education Association

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian Educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council (GLITC) Education sub-committee.

The GLITC Education Committee began in the early 1970’s but was disbanded around 1983 because of a lack of funds.

A group of concerned Indian Educators began meeting in 1984 and after a series of meetings during that year, developed By-laws and a mission statement.

The group was formally organized in 1985 as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

The Association has seven regions throughout the State. Each region elects/appoints two representatives as WIEA Board members for a two-year term.

Each Region’s Board members are responsible for hosting a meeting in their region throughout the year to share and gather information for the Board to either act upon or disseminate to all other WIEA members.

The Board meets every month except December. Meetings are held in the various regions throughout the state in an effort to get input from the general membership regarding their issues and concerns.

MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference: RFP!

Rita S. Fierro, PhD from Fierro Consulting has agreed to give the Keynote Address at the MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference on May 10, 2018. The conference theme is Enhancing Evaluation Through Effective Communication and Interaction. The conference is accepting proposals for presentations and posters at this time. Go to maeeval.org for more information about Dr. Fierro’s keynote and links to the application forms.

*The deadline for proposals is Monday, January 22, 2018.

Register today for LUCA!

Has your tribe built new housing developments in the last decade? The deadline for tribal governments to register for the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) is fast approaching December 15, 2017To count everyone in your tribal communities accurately, the Census Bureau has to know where to count them. This is your once in a decade opportunity to review the address listing and let the Census Bureau know where housing changes are taking place. Tribes must register by December 15, 2017. All registered tribes will receive LUCA materials in February to April 2018 for their review during a 120-day review period. Official letters were mailed to all tribal governments in July 2017.

 

REGISTER HERE

Dr. Bowman’s AEA Presentation Available Online Now!

Dr. Nicole Bowman presented, “Looking Backward but Moving Forward: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Indigenous Evaluation. at American Evaluation Associations, Evaluation 2017 conference.

*View Dr. Bowman’s slides online.

Presentation Abstract:

Culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) and culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation (CRIE) within the broader field of evaluation specialized designs is not often included in western literature nor known or used by the majority of mainstream evaluators.  In order to address this literature and practice gap, this article offers an origin story of CRIE prior to Colonial or European contact in the United States and gives a historical, theoretical, and practical foundation for conducting CRIE in a contemporary context.  Examples of evidence-based models and resources connect CRIE to western designs and provide concrete strategies for the field of evaluation going forward.  The article provides a new evaluation research, policy and practice for the field of evaluation to consider so that when working with Indigenous populations and Tribal governments a more culturally and contextually responsive, scientifically rigorous, and ethical evaluation can be conducted.

About AEA

The American Evaluation Association is a professional association of evaluators devoted to the application and exploration of program evaluation, personnel evaluation, technology, and many other forms of evaluation. Evaluation involves assessing the strengths and weaknesses of programs, policies, personnel, products, and organizations to improve their effectiveness. AEA has approximately 7300 members representing all 50 states in the United States as well as over 80 foreign countries.

The American Evaluation Association seeks to act in ways that embody our mission, vision, and values in pursuit of our defined policies and goals.

MISSION: The American Evaluation Association’s mission is to improve evaluation practices and methods, increase evaluation use, promote evaluation as a profession, and support the contribution of evaluation to the generation of theory and knowledge about effective human action.

VISION: The American Evaluation Association’s vision is to foster an inclusive, diverse, and international community of practice positioned as a respected source of information for and about the field of evaluation.

VALUES: The American Evaluation Association values excellence in evaluation practice, utilization of evaluation findings, and inclusion and diversity in the evaluation community.

i. We value high quality, ethically defensible, culturally responsive evaluation practices that lead to effective and humane organizations and ultimately to the enhancement of the public good.

ii. We value high quality, ethically defensible, culturally responsive evaluation practices that contribute to decision-making processes, program improvement, and policy formulation.

iii. We value a global and international evaluation community and understanding of evaluation practices.

iv. We value the continual development of evaluation professionals and the development of evaluators from under-represented groups.

v. We value inclusiveness and diversity, welcoming members at any point in their career, from any context, and representing a range of thought and approaches.

vi. We value efficient, effective, responsive, transparent, and socially responsible association operations.

Organization: AEA is led by a Board, advised by Task Forces and Working Groups, structured around Topical Interest Groups (TIGs), and aligned with recognized regional affiliate associations.  Learn more

Bylaws: The Bylaws of the American Evaluation Association serve as the legal foundation for Association operations.  Learn more

Awards: AEA’s awards program acknowledges outstanding contributions and service to the field of evaluation.  Learn more

Contacts: We welcome your inquiries about the association, membership, our annual conference, programs, or services. Please do not hesitate to contact the AEA office at any time.  Learn more

Register today for Diversity Forum 2017

Please register today to join us at the 2017 UW-Madison Diversity Forum, Together: Building Cultural Capacity at Union South. (See schedule at Diversity Forum 2017)

This year we will have a two-day forum. Tuesday, November 7, will be our traditional forum format of an engaging and instructional keynote speaker, Native American Civil Rights Attorney Walter Echo-Hawk. We’ll also have informative diversity updates, insightful breakout sessions and our Campus/Community Town Hall, where we will discuss DACA (Deferred Action for Child Arrivals).

Wednesday, November 8, will be Cultural Competency Workshop Training for Mental Health Specialists, Student Service Professionals and Advisors, and will include an opening keynote by Dr. Sarah Van Orman and a student panel moderated by Simone Collins of University Health Services. This forum will set the stage for six repeated training workshops offered by experienced campus professionals.

Register today for both days:

2017 Diversity Forum Day 1, Together: Building Cultural Capacity: http://go.wisc.edu/i2w2pd

2017 Diversity Forum Day 2, Cultural Competency Workshop Training for Mental Health Specialists, Student Service Professionals and Advisors: http://go.wisc.edu/a9van3

 

See more and download the brochure on our 2017 Diversity Forum Day 2 Cultural Competency Workshop Training for Mental Health Specialists, Student Service Professionals and Advisors.

See you at Evaluation 2017!

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Graphic Facilitation Training for Evaluators!

 

A one-day, hands-on introduction to visual thinking
and graphic facilitation.

The power to clarify thinking, create shared understanding and to make positive change is at your fingertips. All you need is paper and pen.

In this interactive and engaging full-day workshop, Brandy Agerbeck shares her solid gold lessons from over 20 years’ experience as a graphic facilitator creating live, large-scale drawings for her clients. She’ll give you concrete, accessible tips on HOW to reclaim drawing as your best thinking tool and important reasons WHY visuals are vital to helping groups understanding and improve their work.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the basic principles of graphic facilitation, practice it, and understand some of the business basics (e.g., hiring a graphic facilitator, consulting as a graphic facilitator)
  • Bring together a diverse group of evaluators, artists, and communication design students for peer mentorship
Why Graphic Facilitation?

In 2016, ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Inc. identified one of the leaders in graphic facilitation, Brandy Agerbeck, was right next door in Chicago! We’ve been working ever since to bring her to Wisconsin. In partnership with the Milwaukee Art Institute and Design (MIAD), we are excited to bring you this training. 3 out of 4 learners are visual thinkers. Millennials are taking the reigns – leading in all sectors from government to nonprofit. They use visual tools and social media more than their predecessors. To facilitate evaluation use, we need to do things differently – like getting data out there that speaks to visual decision-makers. We also see the void of this skill in the Milwaukee area (and likely the state). This event is the first step in getting more graphic facilitators working in our community providing this service – and it’s starting with the ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Inc. community.

We also want to make connections to the graphic illustrators and artists so we invited MIAD to join us. At the training there will be lots of opportunity to work with artists, artist communities of practice from around the state, and artists of color. Thank you Dale Schilder, Chair of Graphic Illustration for joining us on this journey!

You can Draw
Can evaluators draw a square box? YES!!!! We asked Brandy if evaluators could really do her training. She said yes, we know the content which makes us the best type of training participant. The drawing part is easy, distilling the content to obtain an accurate record of the meeting is A LOT harder!
Don’t live in Milwaukee? Come anyway!
We are sharing the dates early so that we can have as many non-Milwaukee evaluators and artists participate as possible. Space is limited and we are inviting artists from many communities to join us so book today!
Get Your Name Out There
This training is worth hundreds of dollars. Brandy usually charges over $1K for a single participant. To cover the cost of our training ($60 for members), we would like to offer $25 advertisements (logos only) to be included in the training manual insert. The advertisement guidelines can be found here.

 

¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Members: $60
Non-members: $60 until Dec. 15th, then $100 (hurry and register soon!)

MIAD Students: To register, contact Dale Schilder

Light refreshments, lunch and art supplies included

Friday, January 26, 2018
9:00 am to 4:00 pmMilwaukee Institute for Art and Design
273 E. Erie St., Milwaukee, WI 53202

Parking
Italian Community Center – $5

Pre-Order Books – special discounts for our training participants! Pre-order Brandy’s books by December 31st at a 20% discount at: www.loosetooth.com/events/mke