Call for Proposals: A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

March 19-20, 2018

Sponsored by

The Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI), University of Minnesota

The University of Melbourne (Australia) Centre for Program Evaluation

Claremont Graduate University

The Teaching of Evaluation Topical Interest Group of the American Evaluation Association

The purpose of this working conference is to engage evaluation trainers, instructors, and faculty to begin a formal discussion of the current status of the education and training of program evaluators. The conference will address a range of essential questions, including:

– What are foundational questions in the area of evaluation education, and how can researchers and practitioners collaborate to describe and
explore them together?
– What are the risks of not addressing evaluation education with data-driven questions and solutions?
– What research exists on evaluator education/training, and what is needed?
– How can research on evaluation education be strengthened?

We seek proposals from people who are actively engaged in evaluation education practice so we can establish a collaborative, professional community of individuals charged with teaching the current and future generations of evaluators.

A number of presentation opportunities are available for participants to share their theoretical and empirical work on evaluation education. We are requesting proposals for presentations of 3-5 minutes on a variety of topics related to the education and training of evaluators, including, but not limited to, the following:

– Conceptual framings of evaluator and evaluation education/training
– Research on evaluator and evaluation education/training
– The status and future of evaluation educators in different settings (e.g., university, paid professional development, conferences, in-house
trainings, on-line)
– The role of competencies in curriculum development
– Pedagogy for the practice of evaluation
– Assessing learning and impact from evaluator education/training programs
– The appropriateness and potential of program accreditation and/or evaluator credentialing
– Good questions to shape our vision and future work

All proposals will undergo peer-review for content and fit with conference goals.  For your work to be considered, please complete the application at https://goo.gl/forms/DjzyHmozZtj9lITQ2 and submit your form by January 15, 2018.

Anticipated benefits of this conference and the pre-work leading to it include the following:

Benefits for participants

·         Adding a conference presentation to your resume or CV
·         Establishing connections with others working in evaluation education
·         Participating in a conversation that will shape the research agenda and future of evaluator education

Potential benefits for participants over time

·         Collaborative research and eventual; publications on key topics identified
·         Participation in AEA conference panel presentations in coming years
·         Access to an ongoing community working on cutting edge research to improve teaching practice

The working conference will occur concurrently with the annual Spring Training of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute. It will begin at
5:00 PM on Monday, March 19, 2018 with an introductory working session and dinner, then continue throughout the day on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, with presentations in the morning and early afternoon and ending with agenda setting and final debriefing. There will be no cost to attend the working conference, although participants can attend the MESI conference for an additional fee.  See www.evaluation.umn.edu for details and more information.

2018 NEA ESP Conference

March 23-25, 2018



Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista
1751 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
(407) 827-4000

General Registration Information

CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION

The NEA ESP conference is the premier professional development opportunity for Education Support Professionals across the nation. The goal of this conference is to enhance the skills and knowledge of ESP members to positively impact student achievement, build community relations, organize members, advocate for educators, build stronger locals, and help our members do their jobs better. The conference offers more than 60 different hands-on workshops over the course of four days. Pre-Conference workshop opportunities are offered in topics ranging from social justice, early career educators, leadership development, team building and school climate.

See the 2017 program…

How To Register

Online Registration

  • Online registration for the 2018 NEA ESP Conference is now open. Click the Register Now icon above and reserve your space today!

On-site Registration

  • On-site registration will be made available for all participants until full capacity is reached.
  • Personal checks will NOT be accepted on-site.
  • Pre-conference workshops are on a first-come, first-served basis. Some pre-conference workshops may be filled to capacity at the time of on-site registration and will not be available.

Terms

  • Registration is accepted on a full-payment, first-come, first-served basis only.
  • Personal checks will not be accepted as a form of payment.

Registration Fees and Refunds

NEA ESP Conference registration fees are as follows:

NEA Member Pre-Conference Participant Registrants (Thursday-Sunday): $250

  • Includes breakfast and lunch during pre-conference session days
  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, awards dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Non-Member Pre-Conference Participant Registrants (Thursday-Sunday): $350

  • Includes breakfast and lunch during pre-conference session days
  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, dinner and entertainment on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

NEA Member Conference Participant Registrants (Friday-Sunday): $200

  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, dinner and entertainment on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Non-member Conference Participant Registrants (Friday-Sunday): $300

  • Includes breakfast and lunch on Saturday, awards dinner on Saturday, and breakfast and brunch on Sunday.

Exhibitor Opportunities: $700

  • Includes booth space from Thursday – Saturday of the conference, all provided conference meals for one person each day.
  • Registration for all exhibitor opportunities are available through online conference registration.
  • Online registration for the 2018 NEA ESP Conference will open in the fall.
  • Sponsorship opportunities are also available. Click here for more information.

NOTE: Online registration will open in the fall. Personal checks will not be accepted as a form of payment.

As a reminder, pre-conference spots are reserved on a first-come, first-served basis. Don’t miss reserving your spot!

Refunds

The deadline to request a 100 percent refund of registration fees is two weeks after online registration closes. Registrants will be eligible to receive a 50 percent refund during the third week after online registration closes. Thereafter, conference registration will be non-refundable.

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Registration Confirmation

CVent, NEA’s online conference registration system, will automatically generate a confirmation number upon completion of your registration. This confirmation number can be found in your confirmation email once you have submitted your registration, as well as in the confirmation page that will appear immediately after submitting your registration. Confirmation numbers are required to make future changes to registration accounts. Please be sure to keep this confirmation number for your records.

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First Timers Session

The NEA ESP Quality Department in the Center for Great Public Schools welcomes all of our first timer registrants to the NEA ESP Conference! We are confident that our programs will include great professional development sessions for you to add to your PD tool box. The NEA ESP Conference provides first timers with a special First Timers Lunch Session, held during on Friday afternoon of each conference weekend. This session is designed to acclimate first time attendees with both the NEA structure, conference structure and networking opportunities. Pre-registration is required once conference registration opens.

Lost, have questions, need one-on-one direction? Visit the conference registration desk. We are happy to assist you!

Hotel Lodging and Transportation

Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista
1751 Hotel Plaza Blvd.
Lake Buena Vista, FL 32830
(407) 827-4000

ROOM RATES

To receive the conference rate of $174 per night ($195.75 with tax included), reference the 2018 NEA ESP Conference when making hotel reservations over the phone. Reservations can also be made online by visiting, https://aws.passkey.com/go/2018NEAESPConference.

NOTE: Attendees fully funded by NEA to attend the conference should NOT make their own hotel reservations. Fully funded attendees will be added to the NEA hotel direct bill list via the internal conference registration process. NEA will not reimburse fully funded attendees for independently reserved hotel rooms.

AIRPORT TAXI AND SHUTTLE SERVICES

In an effort to reduce transportation costs, we encourage participants to reserve shuttle services ahead of time or to make arrangements to carpool with colleagues to and from the airport for all conference locations.

Questions or Comments

  • Questions or comments regarding ESP Conference registration should be addressed to Lisa Connor.
  • Questions or comments regarding conference ESP of the Year nominees and state selected Leadership nominees should be directed to Lisa Connor.
  • Inquiries regarding exhibiting at the ESP Conference should be directed to Jessica Brinkley.

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Now Available

2018 Pre-Conference Session Descriptions ( PDF, 3 pgs.)

For Reference

2017 ESP Conference Program  ( PDF, 51 pgs.)

*Join the new NEA ESP Conference online community through NEA edCommunities and become a member of the ESP Conference Group! This group will house real-time conference information, pictures, discussion areas for participants, and more!

*Info from http://www.nea.org/grants/31430.htm

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NOVEMBER 1, 2017

CONTACT:

Brian Jackson

President

Wisconsin Indian Education Association

Office: (715) 588-3800

Email: brian.jackson@ldfschool.org

Wisconsin Indian Education Association celebrates Native American Heritage Month in November

Organization issues open Call-to-Action to strengthen relations, address disparities faced by American Indians and ending the use of race based mascots.

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) is proud to celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month during the month of November. On August 3, 1990, President of the United States George H. W. Bush declared the month of November as National American Indian Heritage Month, thereafter commonly referred to as Native American Heritage Month. The Bill reads in part that “the President has authorized and requested to call upon Federal, State and local Governments, groups and organizations and the people of the United States to observe such month with appropriate programs, ceremonies and activities.” Every year since, the Office of the President has issued a proclamation supporting the month as such. The landmark Bill honors America’s indigenous people.

In keeping with the essence of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association honors the unique culture, history and perseverance of the 11 federally recognized tribal nations within the state, as well as all Native nations across both North and South America.

WIEA President Brian Jackson says the organization is calling on tribal, state and local governments, public and private schools, tribal education programs and departments and civic groups alike to implement curriculum that strengthen educational offerings about Indigenous peoples in Wisconsin.

“For hundreds of years, American Indian history has been obscured, altered and in many instances erased from existence,” said Jackson. “It has long been a mission of WIEA to educate our non-Indian neighbors to the valuable contributions of Native Americans over the course of American history — many of which have allowed this country to attain a level of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by so many,” added Jackson.

As part of Native American Heritage Month, the Wisconsin Indian Education Association is issuing a call to action to address three main areas in closing the cultural divide while increasing the socioeconomic, educational and political position of Wisconsin’s tribal nations:

  • An open challenge to local governments, schools, civic organizations and individuals to learn more about the historical and contemporary connections of your local community to neighboring tribes and tribal communities in general.
  • Request that school districts employing race-based mascots develop an exit strategy away from the use of American Indian or other race based imagery within one (1) year. This request is especially critical if a school within the district you reside or a school within your school’s athletic conference currently uses a race based mascot.
  • Contact your legislator(s) to request a repeal of the 2013 Wisconsin Act 115, which makes it nearly impossible for those who object to race-based mascots and sports team names to bring about change at their school district.

Over the nearly 25-year history of WIEA, the group has remained a catalyst in the effort to incorporate historically accurate Native American curriculum into Wisconsin public schools. The effort gained support when former Governor Jim Doyle (D) signed into law Wisconsin Act 31, which requires public schools to offer historically accurate instruction on American Indian tribes in the state. Act 31 was born as a result of the ugly and sometimes violent protests of the late 80s and early 90s organized by non-Indian groups opposed to Chippewa Treaty Rights. Ultimately, District Judge Barbara Crabb ruled in favor of tribal spearers who sought a permanent injunction prohibiting non-Indian protesters from interfering with their court affirmed Treaty Rights, finding the protests to be racially motivated.

In addition to the call-to-action initiatives, WIEA will participate in a National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots, which is scheduled for Friday, November 17, 2017. Tribes, communities, universities and groups across the country plan to hold local and national events. From documentaries and movie showings, to book readings and workshops, and cultural events, the National Day-of-Action on Race Based Mascots brings to the forefront the social issues caused by Indian and other race based mascots.

“We’re encouraging everyone to participate in American Indian Heritage Month along with the November 17th National Day-of-Action on Raced Based Mascots,” said Jackson. “We all have a responsibility to add to the quality of life in our respective communities. When we act in the spirit of cooperation and unity, we create the framework for a positive future for people of all races and cultures in Wisconsin and beyond.”

Jackson says that WIEA, along with the Indian Mascot and Logo Task Force, offer a host of educational resources that provide historically accurate, authentic information on Wisconsin’s Native nations. “Much of the general public’s views and misconceptions of American Indians is due to the lack of meaningful information,” said Jackson. “WIEA is open to partnering to provide materials, training, resources and information to any group or organization interesting in broadening their knowledge base on American Indians – that also includes widening their network and fostering positive relationships,” Jackson added.

The American Indian Heritage or Native American Heritage Month designation aims to provide a platform for Native people in the United States to share their culture, traditions, music, crafts, dance and ways and concepts of life. This gives Native people and their allies the opportunity to express to their community, city, county and state officials their concerns and solutions for building bridges of understanding and cooperation in their local area.

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For additional resources visit any one of the following websites:

www.indianmascots.com

www.wiea.org

www.wisconsinact31.org

www.dpi.wi.gov/amind/state-statues

About the Wisconsin Indian Education Association

The Wisconsin Indian Education Association (WIEA) was established in 1985 by a group of concerned Indian Educators to carry on the efforts of the former Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Council (GLITC) Education sub-committee.

The GLITC Education Committee began in the early 1970’s but was disbanded around 1983 because of a lack of funds.

A group of concerned Indian Educators began meeting in 1984 and after a series of meetings during that year, developed By-laws and a mission statement.

The group was formally organized in 1985 as the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

The Association has seven regions throughout the State. Each region elects/appoints two representatives as WIEA Board members for a two-year term.

Each Region’s Board members are responsible for hosting a meeting in their region throughout the year to share and gather information for the Board to either act upon or disseminate to all other WIEA members.

The Board meets every month except December. Meetings are held in the various regions throughout the state in an effort to get input from the general membership regarding their issues and concerns.

College of Menominee Nation Wins Major Grant

The following is an announcement from Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

The office of U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin has announced a $798,199 grant from the U.S. Department of Education to help provide ACT preparation courses and leadership opportunities to Menominee Indian High School students. The award will be managed by the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) of the College of Menominee Nation.

Project partners collaborating with SDI include the College of Menominee Nation’s teacher education program and digital media program, Menominee Indian School District; Menominee Tribal School; Mawaw Ceseniyah, a community-based Menominee culture and language organization; and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Midwest Region Fire Prevention program. The four-year grant will enhance and expand SDI’s successful youth enrichment program model known as the Sustainability Leadership Cohort. Funding will bring new multifaceted activities centered on fire, which will help introduce language and culture teachings, science, technology, engineering and math concepts, along with leadership and responsibility. The students will gain a better understanding of how Indigenous ecological knowledge and Western science can interact, and how to apply that understanding to address environmental issues both inside and outside the classroom.

The project team will be providing more ACT preparation opportunities for the Menominee Indian High School students to generate an increase in the number of students who take the ACT and apply to college. In addition to receiving ACT preparation, students will work with teams made up of in-service and pre-service teachers, language and culture practitioners, and CMN staff to develop science lessons for elementary classrooms using Indigenous knowledge as the base. This work will take place on the Menominee reservation in Wisconsin, at the College of Menominee Nation’s Keshena campus, the Menominee Tribal School, and in the Menominee Indian School District.

Both high school and undergraduate interns (pre-service teachers) will be hired in early 2018. Students will receive a stipend for participation in this program and have the opportunity to present their work at relevant conferences. Funding for the project, titled “Preparing Native Youth for the Future through the Sustainability Leadership Cohort,” is through the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education and Office of Indian Education: Indian Education Discretionary Grants Programs: Demonstration Grants for Indian Children Program.

*Blog originally published here.

NIH STEP-UP 11th & 12th Grade High School Portal Open

 

National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK)

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

2017 American Indian/Alaska Native High School
NIH/NIDDK STEP-UP Cohort
The STEP-UP Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

Program Highlights

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held in Washington, D.C.
  • Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.

Eligibility Requirements

  • U.S. Citizen, non-citizen national, or permanent legal resident of U.S.- affiliated territory
  • High school junior or senior (at the time of application)
  • Must meet one or more of the following criteria:
    • Part of an underrepresented racial or ethnic group (American Indian/Alaska Native).
    • Disadvantage as defined by annual family income
    • First generation in family to attend college
    • Diagnosed with a disability limiting one or more major life activities

Principal Investigator: Dr. Carolee Dodge-Francis
Emailcarolee.dodge-francis@unlv.edu
American Indian Research & Education Center (AIREC)

Apply at: http://stepup.niddk.nih.gov/Register.aspx
(If you are a new participant register as a new user and don’t forget to store your email/username and passcode, you will need later if you are a returning, second year use last years’ information)
Apply October 15, 2017 through February 15, 2018
Apply Now

 

ELPA’s PhD Cohort in K-12 Leadership

4th PhD Cohort to start Fall 2018. Application deadline is January 1st, 2018.

View the PDF for details!

Most States Plan To Use Student Absences To Measure School Success

How do you judge how good a school is? Test scores? Culture? Attendance?

In the new federal education law (the Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA) states are asked to use five measures of student success. The first four are related to academics — like annual tests and graduation rates. The fourth measures proficiency of English language learners.

The fifth is the wild card — aimed at measuring “student success or school quality” — and the law leaves it to states to decide.

Learn More!

10 Tips for Creating a Fertile Environment for Kids’ Creativity and Growth

TEN TIPS FOR PARENTS AND TEACHERS

There’s a common misconception that the best way to encourage children’s creativity is simply to get out of the way and let them be creative. Although it’s certainly true that children are naturally curious and inquisitive, they need support to develop their creative capacities and reach their full creative potential.

Supporting children’s development is always a balancing act: how much structure, how much freedom; when to step in, when to step back; when to show, when to tell, when to ask, when to listen.

Learn More!

Business Plan Basics – November 2nd

Small business owners, entrepreneurs and aspiring business owners are invited to attend “Business Plan Basics” onThursday, November 2nd. The class will run from 6-9 pm. at Western Dairyland Business Center, 418 Wisconsin St., Eau Claire.
Class participants will learn how to create an effective and engaging business plan that can be presented to lenders or simply used to guide the launch and growth of a new business. Tuition is $29. Class materials are included. Scholarships are available for income-eligible individuals.
A business plan is an important document for anyone starting a new business, expanding an existing business, or launching a new product. Fundamentally, a business plan will include a mission statement, business description, product description, market analysis, marketing plan, operations plan, management plan and financial projections. However, more than just a document, the process involved with putting the components of a business plan together will help the entrepreneur identify and mitigate risk.
Kelly Berry is the owner ofResourceAbility, LLC and has been in business for over 12 years. She specializes in research, marketing planning, strategic planning and project management. Kelly is approved as a Service Provider for the Wisconsin Center for Technology Commercialization to write business plans and commercialization plans funded by state grants. She enjoys working with entrepreneurs and small business owners across Western Wisconsin
There are three easy ways to register and pay for the class: online at www.SuccessfulBusiness.org, by phone at 836-7511 ext. 1171, or in person at the Western Dairyland office in downtown Eau Claire. Because space is limited, pre-registration and payment is required.

Dr. Jolene Bowman Named President of NIEA

Dr. Jolene Bowman, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Vice President and WIEA Board Member to be sworn-in as NIEA President
Swearing in to take place on Saturday, October 7th at 48th Annual National Indian Education Association Convention & Trade Show in Orlando, FL

ORLANDO, FL – After waiting nearly a year to take her seat as the board president of the National Indian Education Association, Dr. Jolene Bowman will officially take the reigns this afternoon when she is sworn-in at the organization’s 48th Annual Convention & Trade Show at the Caribe Royal Orlando Hotel and Convention Center.

Dr. Bowman brings with her a strong presence and solid understanding of the issues facing American Indian students and communities. Hailing from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin, where she serves as the tribe’s governing board Vice President, Bowman has long been a proponent of widening the educational opportunities of American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

“I plan to use my new position to advocate for Indian education and Native students by getting in the know about the particular subject or issue students may be experiencing,” said Bowman. “I not only want to work through those challenges but also celebrate the accomplishments of our people.”

Bowman was elected president at last year’s NIEA convention held in Reno, NV. and has spent the last year building momentum for her new post through her work as both secretary for the organization and board member of the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

WIEA president Brian Jackson says he’s excited to see the impact Bowman will have on Indian education in Wisconsin and across the nation.

“I’m confident Dr. Bowman will continue NIEA’s efforts to increase educational opportunities for Native students everywhere,” said Jackson. “Women are the backbone of our Native communities. She has a strong sense of identity and has demonstrated her ability to lead through her previous successes working in tribal communities,” added Jackson, who traveled to Orlando in support of Bowman and Wisconsin Indian education.

One of Bowman’s first orders of business as NIEA president will be to address the growing funding needs of Indian education at the federal level.

“NIEA is the only organization that is exclusively working on behalf of native students to ensure that our trust responsibility is being upheld,” said Bowman, referring to the federal government’s treaty and trust responsibility to American Indian tribes.

“In the current context, Indian education was under attack in the last (federal) budget and NIEA will continue to work diligently to ensure our Native schools and Native student populations are funded,” Bowman added.

Bowman will serve a one (1) year term as board president, which will run concurrent to her other obligations in Wisconsin.

The 48th annual NIEA Convention & Tradeshow runs October 4 – 7, 2017, in Orlando, FL.