Dr. Jolene Bowman Named President of NIEA

Dr. Jolene Bowman, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Vice President and WIEA Board Member to be sworn-in as NIEA President
Swearing in to take place on Saturday, October 7th at 48th Annual National Indian Education Association Convention & Trade Show in Orlando, FL

ORLANDO, FL – After waiting nearly a year to take her seat as the board president of the National Indian Education Association, Dr. Jolene Bowman will officially take the reigns this afternoon when she is sworn-in at the organization’s 48th Annual Convention & Trade Show at the Caribe Royal Orlando Hotel and Convention Center.

Dr. Bowman brings with her a strong presence and solid understanding of the issues facing American Indian students and communities. Hailing from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin, where she serves as the tribe’s governing board Vice President, Bowman has long been a proponent of widening the educational opportunities of American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

“I plan to use my new position to advocate for Indian education and Native students by getting in the know about the particular subject or issue students may be experiencing,” said Bowman. “I not only want to work through those challenges but also celebrate the accomplishments of our people.”

Bowman was elected president at last year’s NIEA convention held in Reno, NV. and has spent the last year building momentum for her new post through her work as both secretary for the organization and board member of the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

WIEA president Brian Jackson says he’s excited to see the impact Bowman will have on Indian education in Wisconsin and across the nation.

“I’m confident Dr. Bowman will continue NIEA’s efforts to increase educational opportunities for Native students everywhere,” said Jackson. “Women are the backbone of our Native communities. She has a strong sense of identity and has demonstrated her ability to lead through her previous successes working in tribal communities,” added Jackson, who traveled to Orlando in support of Bowman and Wisconsin Indian education.

One of Bowman’s first orders of business as NIEA president will be to address the growing funding needs of Indian education at the federal level.

“NIEA is the only organization that is exclusively working on behalf of native students to ensure that our trust responsibility is being upheld,” said Bowman, referring to the federal government’s treaty and trust responsibility to American Indian tribes.

“In the current context, Indian education was under attack in the last (federal) budget and NIEA will continue to work diligently to ensure our Native schools and Native student populations are funded,” Bowman added.

Bowman will serve a one (1) year term as board president, which will run concurrent to her other obligations in Wisconsin.

The 48th annual NIEA Convention & Tradeshow runs October 4 – 7, 2017, in Orlando, FL.

Nicole Bowman Bio Page

Dr. Nicole Bowman

“Wiciwen Niw Kenewak”

Nicole R. Bowman-Farrell, Ph.D. (Mohican/Munsee)

President and Founder, Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC

Email Nicole

Nicole’s IRB (CITI) Certification (2012)

Nicole’s Resume (PDF)

Professional Biography (PDF)

Dr. Nicole Bowman holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis (2015). She also earned a M.Ed. from Lesley University in Curriculum & Instruction (1996) and a B.A. from St. Norbert College in Elementary Education (1993). She has nearly 20 years of experience providing programming and completing research, evaluation, and technical assistance services within tribal and public contexts (rural, urban, and reservation) where scientific rigor and cultural responsiveness are the foundation to the services provided.

In her May 2015 dissertation, Dr. Bowman created and completed a first of its kind national study that used a multi-jurisdictional or tri-lateral approach to studying tribal and public education policy via the lenses of tribal, local, state, and public government educational agencies. She documented the multiple internal structures and steps of how tribal government policy is developed and what influences tribal and public education policy where American Indian students attend public K-12 schools. This study provides a new framework to operationalize how tribal and non-tribal governments can collaborate to strengthen policies, systems, and policy activities that can support educational success and improved outcomes for American Indian students.

Dr. Bowman is a national leader in Indigenous evaluation and has served the American Evaluation Association (AEA) through blogs, webinars, full day pre-conference workshops at the annual international AEA conference, conducting internal environmental audits, providing peer reviewed journal support as an editorial board member for AEA’s New Directions in Evaluation Journal and through other diversity, governance, and evaluation activities of AEA in elected or employed leadership. She contributed to the book Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture & Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory & Practice (Information Age Publishing, 2015) regarding multi-jurisdictional Indigenous evaluation, and continues to build capacities with tribal and non-tribal partners for strengthening human, cultural, and intellectual property protections, culturally responsive evaluation, and tribal/non-tribal government partnerships.

As BPC’s president and founder (2001) Dr. Bowman is BPC’s primary point of contact. She may be contacted at info@bpcwi.com or 715-526-9240

Custom Training and Consulting Upon Request

Bowman Performance Consulting  271 River Pine Drive, Shawano, WI  54166  ♦  Phone:  715-526-9240  ♦  Fax:  715-526-6028

Karen Washinawatok Bio Page

 12.12.13 Karen Washinawatok photo

Karen Washinawatok

Cultural Resource & Research Specialist for Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC

Email Karen

Karen’s Resume

CITI Certificate

Ms. Washinawatok holds a M.A. from the University of Arizona in Language, Reading & Culture (2003). She also has a B.A. from Native American Educational Services (NAES) College in Community Studies (1993). She is a lifetime language speaker and traditional leader, has served in leadership in the Menominee Tribal Legislature (MTL) and as MTL Chairwoman for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (2005). She also served as Dean of the Native American Educational Services (NAES) College on the Menominee Reservation (1994-2004). Ms. Washinawatok provides K-12 educational policy and programming guidance in her role as a board member for the Menominee Indian School District (2009-current) and as a teacher at the Menominee Tribal School (2014-2015). Ms. Washinawatok brings over 30 years of tribal and community centered capacity, skill, and nation-to-nation relation building to educational, cultural, and community-based BPC projects.

Custom Training and Consulting Upon Request

Bowman Performance Consulting  271 River Pine Drive, Shawano, WI  54166  ♦  Phone:  715-526-9240  ♦  Fax:  715-526-6028

Dr. Wayne Johnson Bio Page

dr wayne johnson

Dr. Wayne Johnson (Muscogee Creek/Seminole), Ed.D.

Dr. Wayne Johnson holds an Ed.D. from the University of Missouri-Columbia in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis (2009). He earned his Ed.S. degree in Educational Administration from the University of Missouri at Kansas City (2001), a M.Ed. degree in Secondary Administration (1980) from Southwestern Oklahoma State University, and a B.S. degree in Secondary Education (1974) from Baker University. During his more than 41 years in education, Dr. Johnson has served as a teacher, school administrator, and tribal program administrator in varied educational settings, including public and tribal contexts both on- and off-reservation. His focus has been helping to define Indian education that best serves the educational needs of American Indian students. Dr. Johnson possesses expert knowledge in the areas of federal trust responsibility, tribal treaty rights, tribal sovereignty, and federal programs and policies in Indian education. Dr. Johnson currently works as an educational consultant. He consults with Tribal Education Departments, Tribal Education Departments National Assembly, and state and national, public and tribal agencies regarding American Indian education, educational leadership, and educational policy on behalf of American Indian students. Dr. Johnson brings unique knowledge and experienced historical, treaty, and educational perspectives to BPC’s clients, partners, and projects.

 

Renewed Membership with Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce

BPC is proud to have renewed its membership with the Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce for 2017.

Dr. Nicole Bowman Biography

nicky head shot 2Dr. Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Munsee) is the president and founder of the nationally award winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Nicole earned a PhD in 2015 in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis Department from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW), one the nation’s top education schools. Her dissertation was recognized as the first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Dr. Bowman also has an appointment at the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Education Research. She serves as an evaluator for the LEAD Center and the WEC Center.

As BPC’s president, Dr. Bowman has led over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. BPC’s living mission and motto is “working WITH people and not ON them,” reflecting Nicole’s leadership as a responsive and respected subject matter expert on multijurisdictional, education policy, and Indigenous evaluation. This authentic daily practice has helped BPC grow a loyal, diverse, and national client base of hundreds of Native and non-Native clients from all sectors: public, private, and non-profit. BPC is a trusted, collaborative, and innovative partner that provides effective, responsive, and relevant services. BPCs clients do not merely meet their evaluation goals, but build professional and organizational capacities, skills, and resources during the process.

Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate with and empower others at every level. She serves as an elected or appointed member on scientific, education, evaluation, and economic boards locally, nationally, and internationally. Nicole is currently an international board member representing the American Evaluation Association (AEA) in the EvalPartners’ global initiative to connect evaluation efforts around the world on the EvalIndigenous work group. She’s also the chair of AEAs Indigenous People in Evaluation, serves on five internal AEA work groups, is a trusted webinar and conference trainer, and was one of the founding board members of AEAs official state affiliate in Wisconsin for evaluation.

Nationally, Dr. Bowman has been affiliated with projects or professional activities conducted by the American Civil Liberties Union, the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment, the National Indian Education Association, the Eastern Evaluation and Research Society, the Tribal Education Departments National Assembly, the National Congress of American Indians Policy Research Center, American Institutes for Research, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and IMPAQ International, among many others. She’s also served as a reviewer for many respected academic journals, including the American Journal of Evaluation, New Directions in Evaluation, Aotearoa New Zealand Evaluation Association Journal, and the Journal of American Indian Education. Dr. Bowman’s ongoing academic activities keep her current, competent, and caring across all aspects of her professional life.

At the state and local level, Dr. Bowman is a board member of Wisconsin’s Small Business Development Board, has served over a decade under two governors as a board appointee on the Wisconsin Women’s Council, served many years as a board member and education chair on Wisconsin’s American Indian Chamber of Commerce, and is a founding board member of the Menominee Indian Chamber of Commerce and Shawano Boys and Girls Club. Collectively, Dr. Bowman’s participation has been instrumental in shaping educational, academic, and economic policy as well as bringing evidence-based programming and opportunities to support underrepresented voices at all levels of her service. Culturally responsive, scientifically rigorous, and value added services are just a phone call or e-mail away.

You can contact Dr. Bowman directly to learn more at nicky@bpcwi.com, or (715) 526-9240, or nrbowmanfarr@wisc.edu.

Does LEAD Need You?

Program Evaluation for Proposals

We can meet with you to discuss your program or proposal ideas. Please call (608) 263-4256 or email: cmpribbenow@wisc.edu

Current proposal deadlines

Title: Education grants
Sponsor: Lumina Foundation for Education
Deadline: Ongoing; letters of inquiry accepted year round
Summary: Lumina’s goal is to increase the higher education attainment rate of the United States to 60% by 2025. While the Foundation’s mission focuses on both student access and success in higher education, its emphasis is on attainment, defined as completing associate and baccalaureate degrees and credentials. The Foundation focuses on increasing awareness of the benefits of higher education, improving student access to and preparedness for college, improving student success in college, and productivity across the higher education system. See the website for the foundation’s current funding strategies.
URL: http://www.luminafoundation.org/grants.html


Title: Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP)
Sponsor: NSF 16-552
Deadlines: June 14, 2016 and December 9, 2016
Summary: AGEP seeks to advance knowledge about models to improve pathways to the professoriate and success for historically underrepresented minority doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty, particularly African Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Native Pacific Islanders, in specific STEM disciplines and/or STEM education research fields. New and innovative models are encouraged, as are models that reproduce and/or replicate existing evidence-based alliances in significantly different disciplines, institutions, and participant cohorts.
URL: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16552/nsf16552.htm


Title: Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs
Sponsor: Institute of Education Sciences, Department of Education
Deadline: August 4, 2016
Summary: IES’s research grants program is meant to provide the public with reliable and valid information about education practices that support learning and improve academic achievement and access to education opportunities for all students. These grants provide national leadership in expanding fundamental knowledge and understanding of (1) developmental and school readiness outcomes for infants and toddlers with or at risk for disability, and (2) education outcomes for all students from early childhood education through postsecondary and adult education. In carrying out its grants program, IES provides support for programs of research in areas of demonstrated national need and will conduct competitions in FY2017 through two of its centers.

The National Center for Education Research (NCER) will hold six competitions in these areas (topics in parentheses):

  1. Education research (Cognition and Student Learning; Early Learning Programs and Policies; Education Leadership; Education Technology; Effective Teachers and Effective Teaching; English Learners; Improving Education Systems; Mathematics and Science Education; Postsecondary and Adult Education; Reading and Writing; Social and Behavioral Context for Academic Learning; and Special Topics, which include Arts in Education; Career and Technical Education; and Systemic Approaches to Educating Highly Mobile Students);
  2. Education research training (Pathways to the Education Sciences Research Training [NOTE: An institution may submit only one application to the Pathways Training Program]; Postdoctoral Research Training; and Methods Training for Education Researchers);
  3. Statistical and research methodology in education (Statistical and Research Methodology Grants; and Early Career Statistical and Research Methodology Grants);
  4. Partnerships and collaborations focused on problems of practice or policy (Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships in Education Research; and Evaluation of State and Local Education Programs and Policies);
  5. Low-cost, short-duration evaluations; and
  6. Research networks (Exploring Science Teaching in Elementary School Classrooms; and Scalable Strategies to Support College Completion).

The National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) will hold three competitions in these areas (topics in parentheses).

  1. Special education research (Autism Spectrum Disorders; Cognition and Student Learning in Special Education; Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education; Families of Children with Disabilities; Mathematics and Science Education; Professional Development for Teachers and Other Instructional Personnel; Reading, Writing, and Language Development; Social and Behavioral Outcomes to Support Learning; Special Education Policy, Finance, and Systems; Technology for Special Education; and Transition Outcomes for Secondary Students with Disabilities).
  2. Special education research training; and
  3. Low-cost, short-duration evaluations.

URL: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=282060 and https://federalregister.gov/a/2016-05155

Dr. Bowman Appointed to University of Wisconsin Madison Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination (LEAD) Center

IMG_1229Dr. Nicole Bowman has been appointed to University of Wisconsin Madison Learning through Evaluation,  Adaptation, and Dissemination (LEAD) Center.

LEAD website

View LEAD Staff

LEAD Mission

To advance the quality of teaching and learning by evaluating the effectiveness and impact of educational innovations, policies, and practices within higher education. Rigorous, theory-driven methods and interdisciplinary collaborations anchor our approach to evaluation, leading to the translation of findings and evidence-based strategies in service to student learning.

The LEAD Center is housed within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) at the School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

2016 Shawano Chamber Membership

2016 shawano chamber member logoWe’re proud to announce our renewed membership with Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce for 2016! Shop local folks!

Linda Warner Resume

Linda Sue Warner

lsuewarner@yahoo.com

918.919.0154
615.545.1262(cell)
2204 E. Street SW Miami, OK 74354

ACADEMIC DEGREES

Ph.D.   The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (1989)
General Administration
Emphasis: Personnel

M.Ed.   The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (1978)            Emphasis: Education Administration

B.A.     Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK (1970)
Emphasis: Language Arts/Education

A.A.     Northeastern A&M Junior College, Miami, OK (1968)
Emphasis: Liberal Arts

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Special Assistant to the President on Tribal Affairs

Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College

Miami, Oklahoma

January 2011-Present

IPA to Northeast Oklahoma College 2011 to 2013 assigned to NEO Oklahoma from position as Special Assistant, Deputy Director for Performance and Accountability, Albuquerque, NM to develop frameworks and policies for a Department of Education (TEDNA) and Charter School for Oklahoma tribes as requested. Northeast Oklahoma is home to nine tribes, the largest concentration of Indian tribes in Oklahoma. NEO College is a recent recipient of funds to create a Native American Success Center on campus. Regional tribal consultant for grant-writing and policy development including native ways of knowing. Duties include representing NEO with the National Endowment for the Humanities award with Ohio Historical Society and the Shawnee Nation on process technology development.   Additional duties include liaison to The Comanche Nation College in lifelong learning; consultant for federal grant writing to Oklahoma Tribes; syllabi and course development in online degree program development for Title III awards, specifically Early Childhood, Hospitality Management and Criminal Justice. Additionally developed initial format for Institutional Research Board and Mentorship projects.

President, Haskell Indian Nations University

Lawrence, KS

April 2007-December 2010

Haskell Indian Nations University has an enrollment of approximately 1,000 students each semester from over 135 federally recognized tribes. The University has 228 employees and an operating budget of $16million. Baccalaureate and associate degrees are offered. The University was established as a federal boarding school in 1884 and is the oldest continuously operated Bureau of Indian Affairs educational facility in the country. Haskell participates in collegiate sports for men and women in the NAIA.

Current partnerships include The University of Kansas, Kansas State University, Comanche Nation College (OK), The University of North Texas (TX), Institute of American Indian Arts (NM), University of Missouri (MO), Penn State University (PA) and various federal agencies. Haskell’s mission and curriculum are based on four cultural values: Accountability, Respect, Cooperation, and Honesty. The campus sits on 130+ acres and is designated as a national historical landmark.

Major initiatives on the campus include the following:

The RED Center: A site for Research, Evaluation, and Dissemination of current best practices for each of the baccalaureate programs on campus. It includes the Gerald E. Gipp Scholar Program, the Robert G. Martin International Business Entrepreneurial Program and the Karen Gayton Swisher Teacher Mentor Program. This program hosted Fulbright Scholars from Ireland and Russia in 2008.

Community Outreach: Through culturally appropriate learning materials, this project is designed as a literacy program targeting BIE schools through summer bridge programs and materials.

Healthier Haskell: Health and exercise program to complement dietary education designed to impact the high levels of diabetes, obesity, and heart disease in Indian Country.

Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Tennessee State Board of Regents

Professor, Institute for School and Community Renewal, Middle Tennessee State University

August 2003-March 2007

Responsibility and leadership for research and graduate programs for the 5th largest university system in the United States with 185,000 students, 6 universities, 13 community colleges, and 26 technology centers.

Research Universities in Tennessee Board of Regents:

University of Memphis –Memphis                              Tennessee State University -HBCU, Nashville

Middle Tennessee State University-Murfreesboro       East Tennessee State University-Johnson City

Tennessee Technology University-Cookeville University of Memphis-Memphis

Responsibilities include: Graduate degree program approval; policies related to academic affairs, research, technology transfer, international education, sponsored programs, admission and retention standards, academic personnel policies, minority affairs, Centers of Excellence, Centers of Emphasis, Chairs of Excellence, performance funding, and internal research and evaluation.

Major Projects

  • Tennessee Task Force on Teaching Quality
  • E-textbook Initiative; Taskforce on E-Learning
  • Access/Diversity Task Force (in response to Geier consent decree)
  • Research on high school student retention/transition
  • American Indian identity research focus group
  • Chair, Research Committee NAICE
  • EPSCoR liaison from TBR to the statewide committee in collaboration with the University of Tennessee, Vanderbilt University, and state business partners.
  • Research collaboration among the six TBR universities; provide leadership in Vision for Excellence process
  • International Education
  • Tennessee Grants Consortium, Advisory Board
  • Regents Online Degree Program, Graduate Advisory Board
  • TBR and EPSCoR cyber structure committee for Internet2 statewide
  • On-line doctorate in Leadership
  • Tennessee Consortium on International Studies (Advisory Board)
  • Extra-mural funding; principal author for the Tennessee Statewide GEARUP proposal, $30 million+ ; largest federal award made in this category.

Research Faculty, Truman School of Public Policy

University of Missouri-Columbia

March 2003-July 2003

As a research professor in public policy, including liaison with The University of Missouri administration on American Indian policy, specifically repatriation issues, my primary responsibility was for scholarship and service to the University.   I was appointed to a special task force by the Provost to develop strategies and timelines for work with regional tribal groups for compliance with NAGPRA. My research and focus on rural development issues, especially American Indian reservations, paralleled the work of RUPRI, the rural public policy center at MU.   I also taught graduate online courses in Education Law for the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Chief Executive Officer, Indian Community School of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI

January 1999-March 2003

As CEO, I had primary responsibility for the corporate and education mission of a non-profit organization with an annual budget of $15,000,000 and a financial portfolio of $128,000,000. I supervised 153 employees; the student enrollment was approximately 350 pre-school to 8th grade; multi-tribal urban enrollment. The educational program was honored by Deputy Secretary of Education as the Best Indian School in America for incorporating traditional academics into cultural framework in 2002.

Specific responsibilities included:

  • Acting Director of the Urban Indian Education Research Center, a national non-profit organization established under ICS corporate structure with a mission to serve urban Indian populations throughout the United States.       Operating budget of the research center was approximately 3M per year with a permanent staff of six employees and temporary staff of up to l2. Research projects focused on urban Indian populations in health, economic development, and education.
  • Supervision of the day to day school operations of a multi-tribal early childhood through 8th grade curriculum, including the development and research of a culturally relevant curriculum and organizational model.       Nationally recognized programs in education, health, and social welfare which served as models to urban school districts were developed.
  • Oversight responsibilities as CEO for all ancillary programs of the corporation, including, but not limited to social services outreach to the community, summer school, bridge programs, community action projects.
  • I had additional responsibility for the management of the corporate portfolio which included stocks, bonds, real estate, and related businesses. The corporation bonded 70M for the completion of a new facility in Franklin, WI.
  • I provided oversight of the Gerald Ignace Health Center in Milwaukee, WI. ICS incorporated and managed the Ignace Health Center until a separate board could be established and policies could be put in place so that the Center could function as an independent unit (approximately 12 months). The Health Center employed four full time physicians and support personnel.
  • I served as Board liaison to city, state, federal and Wisconsin tribal governments.

During my tenure in Milwaukee I also taught graduate online courses in Education Law and Research Methods for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Program Director, National Science Foundation

Arlington, VA

October 1996-November 1998

I was appointed program officer for Education and Human Resources and managed a portfolio that included systemic reform initiatives in the State of Texas, the State of Michigan; urban systemic initiatives in El Paso, TX and Fresno, CA; rural systemic initiatives in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Michigan, Oklahoma and Missouri. While at NSF, I monitored program compliance and served on interagency task force for projects in Indian Country. This position was an inter-agency personnel agreement. I returned to faculty position at the University of Missouri, upon completion of a two year tour.

Assistant Professor, Education Leadership & Policy Analysis

The University of Missouri-Columbia

August 1995-March 2001

As a professor in the department of Education Leadership and Policy, my responsibilities included research, scholarship, and service to the University. I taught graduate courses in Education Law and the Principalship. As a member of the graduate faculty, I supervised masters and doctoral students in the completion of theses/dissertations. I supervised administration interns in area schools. During this time, I served as faculty advisor to American Indian Student Association: From the Four Directions. I was awarded a Department of Education training grant. While on faculty, I completed a two year rotation at National Science Foundation in the Division of Education System Reform.

Director, American Indian Leadership Program

Penn State University, University Park, PA

August 1993-July 1995

As director, I had an administrative appointment of .50 FTE to supervise the American Indian Leadership Program. This nationally ranked program is the most successful in Indian Country in graduate student retention. It was established in 1970 and remains the most successful program throughout Indian Country.

I also held a faculty appointment for .50 FTE. As a professor my responsibilities included research, scholarship, and service to the University. I taught graduate courses in Education Law and the Principalship. As a member of the graduate faculty, I supervised masters and doctoral level students in the completion of theses/dissertations; I also supervised administrative interns in area schools.    I served on the Faculty Council in the role of Parliamentarian. As principal Investigator on training grants for American Indian students, I worked to recruit and retain qualified Indian professionals. I was awarded a MacArthur grant to plan the World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education which was held in Albuquerque, NM. Over 3,000 conference attendees participated representing ten international indigenous communities.

Assistant Professor, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

August 1990-July 1993

As professor my duties included research, scholarship, and service to the University. I taught graduate courses in Governance, The Principalship, School Facilities, and Sociology. As a member of the graduate faculty, I advised masters and doctoral level students. I supervised administrative interns in area schools. I coordinated a research project with the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City linking 5 A Day diets to lifestyle change on the White Mountain Apache Reservation, AZ. While at KU, I taught classes at Haskell Indian Junior College in the undergraduate liberal arts curriculum as service to the Lawrence community. I also volunteered to read books, newspapers and journals for the university radio station whose target population was the visually impaired. I served as faculty advisor to the American Indian Student Association, NASA.

School Supervisor, Theodore Roosevelt School, Ft. Apache, AZ

January 1986-July 1990

This was my last position as a full time federal employee. I had responsibility for all academic and residential programs in levels 5-8grade boarding school for at risk students. All students were referrals from social service agencies or state/tribal courts. Students were boarded 24/7 for 210 days each year. Programs included a traditional academic program, food service, health services, intensive residential guidance programs, athletic and recreational programs for 125 students. In this position, I had supervisory authority over 39 full time federal employees. Under my supervision, the enrollment increased by 300%; using the intensive residential guidance program, school attendance and retention increased.

Director of Admissions, Haskell Indian Jr. College, Lawrence, KS

now Haskell Indian Nations University

August 1981-December 1986

As Director of Admissions, I my responsibilities included supervision of four full time employees and up to eight student employees. HIJC enrolled approximately 1,000 students per semester and admissions had responsibility for recruitment and retention. The office had a work load for approximately 2,000 students per semester which included applicant/non-enrollees. Activities within the office included all admissions, suspensions, grade reporting, state and federal reporting, athletic certification for the NJCAA, enrollment, transfer and articulation agreements. While at Haskell, I taught freshman English as an overload assignment. In collaboration with other colleagues, I organized a lecture series on campus and sponsored invited guests to the campus. I served as co-sponsor of the Navajo Club.

Vice-Principal (Guidance), Wingate High School, Ft. Wingate, NM

August1980-August 1981

This assignment included responsibility for home living facilities for 1,000+ high school students, grades 9-12. I had direct supervision of 35 full-time employees for programs in residence, food service, social services, counseling, recreation and transportation, essentially all non-academic programs. Ninety-nine percent of the students were residential from Sunday night to Friday afternoon during the academic year.

Building Principal (Language Arts) Wingate High School, Ft. Wingate, NM

March 1977-July 1980

As teacher-supervisor for the Language Arts and Reading department my responsibilities included the development and realignment of the 9-12 Language Arts curriculum. This was the largest department in the school because students frequently took Language Arts electives. Our enrollment in duplicated head count was over 1,200. I also taught college prep English and supervised 20 teachers and teacher aides. During my tenure, we developed a personnel evaluation system and completed training on P.L. 94-142.

English Instructor, Mt. Edgecumbe High School, Sitka, AK

April1975-March 1977

While a teacher at Mt. Edgecumbe, I had responsibility for teaching freshman and sophomore level English courses, basic French courses, and drama. The student load was approximately 100 per day.  The students participated with the Sitka Little Theatre in production of Saroyan’s The Cave Dwellers for community theatre project. I volunteer with the MECAP program for substance abuse counseling and recreation programs. I also supervised “turn-around” in Anchorage, AK when students returned home at the end of the year. Students boarded at the school from August until May each year. This was my first position in the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ school system.

English Instructor, Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green, MO

August 1971-March 1975

As teacher in Northeast Missouri, my responsibilities included teaching freshman and sophomore level English courses in a rural public high school. I had a student load of approximately150 per day. I served as Sophomore Class sponsor each year and cheerleading sponsor for three years. I hold a lifetime teaching certificate in the State of Missouri endorsed in Language Arts.

Teacher, Curryville Elementary School, Bowling Green, MO

September 1970-July 1971

In my first public school contact, I had responsibilities for second grade instruction. Using an emergency teaching certificate, I taught l8 students in a rural, low SES community in Northeast Missouri. Prior to this assignment, I completed student teaching at Miami High School where I taught sophomore and junior level English and French I, II, III.

Commencement Addresses

Warner, L. S. (2007). Kickapoo Nation School, Horton, KS.

Warner, L. S. (1991). Theodore Roosevelt, Fort Apache, AZ.

Warner, L. S. (1985, Winter). Haskell Indian Junior College, Lawrence, KS.

Editorial Boards

Native Subjects: A Journal of Contemporary American Indian                      2013-Present

Issues, Philosophy, and Politics

Tribal College Journal  (2007-2010)

ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools  (2001-2003)

Indigenous Philosophies of the Americas (Assistant Editor)  (2001-2005)

Suahbetainu Kahni: Journal of American Indian Research and Practice (Editor)   (1997-2000)

International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education  (1996-2006)

Initiatives: Journal of the National Association of Women in Education  (1990-1994)

Emergent Leadership  (1976-1982)

Fellowships

Newberry Fellow  (1990)

Smithsonian Fellow  (1984)

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Invited Scholar  (2005)

Gerald R. Ford Center Fellow  (2008)

Honors

AARP Oklahoma Indian Elder Award  (2012)

Department of Education: Negotiated Rulemaking National Committee (2012)

For Title II of the Higher Education Act Appointed by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan

World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education: Chair of USA Representatives   (2011)

Center for the Study of Leadership in American Indian Education-  (2011+)

The Pennsylvania State University—Advisory Board

Northeastern State University: Outstanding Alumna  (2008)

The National Academies: Policy & Global Affairs: Committee on Underrepresented  (2008-09)

Groups & the Expansion of the Science & Engineering Workforce Pipeline

American Council on Education Commission on Effective Leadership  (2008-2011)

The Pennsylvania State University: Alumna Leadership Award  (2006)

College of Education, University of Oklahoma  (2005)

Named one of 75 Alumni who made a difference; one designate for each year of the College’s existence on Diamond Anniversary; G  (1989)

National Advisory Council on American Indian Education  (2004-2009)

Appointed by President George W. Bush Foundation for Excellence in American Indian Education  (2003-2007)

Department of Interior, Appointed by Secretary Gale Norton-Founding Board Member

David L. Clark Distinguished Faculty: University Council of Education Administration  (2003)

Indian Educator of the Year, National Indian Education Association  (2001)

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Gala for Teaching, Mentor Award  (2001)

People to People Ambassador to The Peoples’ Republic of China  (2001)

School of Education Advisory Board, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  (2000-2003)

Advisory Board, National Urban Indian Education Research Center   (2000-2003)

HO’IKE O NA MEA KIPA, World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education Hilo, HI  (1999)

Exemplary Educator, University of Texas at El Paso   (1998)

High Flyer (Outstanding Teaching Award)  (1995)

Outstanding Alumna, Northeastern A & M., Miami, Oklahoma    (1995)

Invited Scholar, The Pennsylvania State University University Park, PA  (1992)

PROFESSIONAL AND ACADEMIC ASSOCIATIONS

World Indigenous Higher Education Consortium (WINHEC) Accreditation Team: Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig

Comanche Nation College Council, Member Governing Board (2004-2012)

International Institute in Indigenous Research, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CA

The European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management

University Council for Education Administration

Urban Indian Education Research Center, Chair, Board of Directors  (2001-3)

American Education Research Association, Division A

Indigenous Peoples of the Americas (American Indian/Alaska Native

SIG-AERA (Chair 1988-89; Chair 1995-96); Rural Education (SIG); Education Law (SIG)

Program Director, Education System Reform, The National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA (1996-98)

The Bodleian Library Reader

Education Law Association

Department of Interior (Norton Appointment) No Child Left Behind Negotiated Rulemaking (2003-2005)

World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education

International Organizing Committee Co-Chair/United States: 1993 Albuquerque, NM

United States Team Leader/Reviewer: Peru: 2011 Cusco

National Indian Telecommunications Institute Corporate Board 1995-2007

Rural Education Association

Native Research Network

Teaching Experience

Graduate                                                                    Undergraduate /Community College

The Principalship                                                         Freshman English

Education Law                                                             Education Governance

Research Methods                                                       Women’s Studies

Indigenous Research                                                    Leadership

Organizational Management and Development                        Tribal Sovereignty

Education Facilities                                          Secondary

Educational Governance                                              AP Senior English

Advanced Supervision of Instruction                          9th Grade English

Teaching & Learning                                                   10th Grade English

                                                                                                French I & II

 

Elementary

Second Grade

 

Reviewer for:

Leadership

Education Administration Quarterly

ERIC/CRESS

International Journal for Qualitative Studies

Anthropology and Education Quarterly

Journal of Research in Leadership Education

Pedagogies: An International Journal

Canadian Journal of Native Education

U.S. Department of Education

-OERI

-21st Century Schools

-Office of Indian Education Programs

U.S. Department of Interior

-Office of Indian Education Programs (Technology Challenge Grants)

U.S. Department of Labor

-Association for Native Americans (Language Preservation )

U.S Department of Commerce

-TOPS

National Science Foundation

Tennessee Higher Education Commission

-Teaching Quality Enhancement

Leadership-Leadership in Asia

Women’s Educational Equity 

PUBLICATIONS/PRESENTATIONS

Book Reviews

Whakawhanaungatanga: Collaborative research stories. Russell Bishop. Palmerston North, New Zealand: Dunmore Press, Ltd. 274pp. Published in Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 1998

The politics of second generation discrimination in American Indian education: incidence, explanation, and mitigating strategies. Robert E. England, David E. Wright and Michael W. Hirlinger. 207 pp. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 1996.

Underrepresentation and the question of diversity: Women and minorities in the community college. Rosemary Gillett-Karam, Suanne D. Roueche, and John E. Roueche. Washington, DC: The Community College Press, 1991, 264pp.

High risk students in higher education: Future trends. Dionne J. Jones and Betty Collier Wilson. 1990 ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Reports. 120 pp.

Encyclopedia Entries

Warner, L. S. (2013). Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today. Leadership: Formal and Informal Leadership within Tribes. Russell M. Lawton, Editor. pp. 589-596. Greenwood Press. Vol 2. Santa Barbara, CA.ISBN: 978-0-313-36144-7.

Warner, L.S. (2013). Encyclopedia of American Indian Issues Today. Indian Schools: History of Schooling Models. Russell M. Lawton, Editor. pp. 138-150. Greenwood Press Vol 1.  Santa Barbara, CA. ISBN: 978-0-313-36144-7.

Sachner, M.J. (Ed) (1997). The Encyclopedia of North American Indians. Education (L.S. Warner). Marshall Cavendish: New York.

Books

Proudfit, J. and Warner, L.S. Series Eds. (2015-2017) On Indian Ground-: A Return to Indigenous Knowledge—Generating Hope, Leadership and Sovereignty through Education. Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC.

2015: On Indian Ground: California (Joely Proudfit, Editor)

2016: On Indian Ground: Bureau of Indian Affairs (Chris Redman, Editor)

2016: On Indian Ground: The Southwest(John W. Tippeconnic, III, Editor)

2015: On Indian Ground: Hawaii (Verli Ann Wright, Editor)

2016: On Indian Ground: Oklahoma (Juanita Pahdahpony, Editor)

2016: On Indian Ground: Northern Plains (Gerald E. Gipp, Editor)

2016: On Indian Ground: The Northwest (Michelle Jacob, Editor)

2017: On Indian Ground: The South (Susan Faircloth, Editor)

2017: On Indian Ground: Northern Woodlands (Michael D. Wilson, Editor)

2017: On Indian Ground: Alaska (Linda Sue Warner, Editor)

Warner, L.S. (Ed) (2014). Education in The Comanche Nation: Relationships, Responsibility, Redistribution and Reciprocity. Routledge Taylor & Francis Books, Oxford, UK. ISBN: 978-1-138-802490.

Warner, L.S., Gipp, G.E. Shanley, J. Pease, J. (Editors) (2015). American Indian Stories of Success: New Visions of Leadership in Indian Country. Praeger Greenwood Press.

Warner, L. S. (2013) Geronimo’s Caves. Publication Pending. Small Town Publishing Puha Voices Press, Miami, OK.

Knowles, F. and Warner, L. S. (2016) The Vision Keepers: Strategies for Urban Indian Educators. In series “Issues in the Research, Theory, Policy, and Practice of Urban Education”, edited by Denise E. Armstrong and Brenda J. McMahon. Information Age Publishing: Charlotte, NC.

Warner, L. S., Hailey, L.M. and Couchman, L. J. (2016). Rigel’s Journey on the Titanic. Small Town Publishing: Miami, OK.

Warner, L. S. and Gipp, G. E. Editors (2009). Culture and Tradition: Tribal Colleges and Universities at the Millennium. Series on Educational Policy in the 21st Century: Opportunities, Challenges and Solutions. InfoAge Publishing: Charlotte, NC. ISBN: 978-1-60752-001-6

Warner, L.S., Hailey, L.M., and Couchman, L. J. (2007) Seaman’s Journey with Lewis and Clark. Missouri Life Press, Fayette, MO. ISBN: 978-0-9749341-1-2

Rossow, Lawrence F. and Warner, L. S. (2000). The Principalship: Dimensions in Instructional Leadership. 2nd Edition. Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC. ISBN 0-89089-908-8

Warner, L. S. (Ed.) (1999, 2000, 2001) Won in the Classroom: Guide to the Selection of Culturally Appropriate Classroom Materials. ICS: Milwaukee, WI.

Book Chapters

Warner, L.S. and Proudfit, J. (2015). Internecine Warfare: White privilege and American Indians in colleges and universities. RIP: Jim Crow: Fighting Racism through Higher Education Policy, Curriculum, and Cultured Interventions. Virginia Stead, Ed. Peter Lang Publishing, U.S.

Proudfit, J. and Warner, L.S. (2015). Warriors for empowering advocates through valuing education. Honoring Our Elders: Culturally Appropriate Approaches for Teaching Indigenous Students. J.Reyhner, L. Lockard, Gilbert, J. Martin (ed)s. Northern Arizona University: Flagstaff, AZ.

Warner, L.S. (2015, January). Native Ways of Knowing: Linking Indigenous Theory and Practice in Higher Education. Handbook for Higher Education Admission Policy and Practice, Virginia Stead, Ed. Peter Lang Publishing, U.S.

Proudfit, J. and Warner, L.S. (2015). Warriors for Empowering Advocates through Valuing Education. Honoring Our Children. Northern Arizona University Press: Flagstaff, AZ.

Warner, L.S. and Grint, K. (2015)   Sacred Places: Indigenous Perspectives of Leadership. In Voices of Resistance and Renewal: Indigenous Leadership in Education. Edited by John Tippeconnic, Tim Begaye, and Dorothy Aguilera. University of Oklahoma Press. Norman, OK. ISBN: 9780806148670

Warner, L.S., Fann, A., & Briscoe, G.S. (2015, Accepted for Publication). The Role of Tradition in Education: Economic Development and American Indian Higher Education in American Indian Workforce Education. Carsten Schmidtke, Ed. Routledge. New York: NY

Warner, L. S. and Grint, K. (2014). War and Peace: Issues of Leadership in American Indian Communities. In Nationalisms and Identities among Indigenous Peoples: Case Studies from North America. Eds. Martina Neuburger and H. Peter Dörrenbächer. Pp. 31-46. Oxford: Peter Lang Publishing. ISBN: 978-3-0343-0838-0

Warner, L.S. (2014). Reflections III in Translating Evidence-Based Multicultural Education into Practice: Lessons Learned from Indian Education for Narrowing Achievement Gap across Diverse Student Groups. Eds. P. McCardle and V. Verninger. Taylor-Francis/Routledge, New York: NY. ISBN: 9780415-727-167.

Warner, L.S. (2013). Research as Activism. In Social Justice and Racism in the College Classroom: Perspectives from Different Voices. pps.133-150. Patricia Boyer and Dannielle Davis, Eds. Emerald Group Publishing. Dulles, VA ISBN: 978-1-78190-499-2.

Warner, L.S. (2011) American Indian Women: Their Role in Self Determination.   In Conference Proceedings from the international and interdisciplinary symposium White-Indian Relations: Moving into the 21st Century, (Eds Maria Moss et al, May 14-17, 2009. Leuphana Universitȁt, Lȕneburg, Germany. Galda & Wilch Publishers. ISBN: 978-1-931255-50-9.

Chiu-Chee, C, Simmons, J.A., Skrla, L., and Warner, L.S. (2011). An Exercise in Tempered Radicalism: The Intersectionality of Gender, Race, and Sexual Identity in Educational Leadership Research.  In Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity. Linda C. Tillman and James Joseph Scheurich Eds. American Education Research Association. Taylor Routledge, New York, NY. ISBN: 978-0-415-65745-7.

Deaton, B., Briscoe, G.S., and Warner, L. S. (2012). A Cost Benefit Analysis of the Navajo Nation RSI. In Indigenous Entrepreneurship: US and UK Experiences. Carolina Academic Press.

Warner, L. S. (2008). Ways of Knowing, Ways of Leading: American Indian Female Entrepreneurship. In Markovic, M. R. and Kyaruzi, I.S. (Eds). Female Entrepreneurship and Local Economic Growth: A Case of Countries in Transition. Pp.393-406. Outskirts Press. Parker, CO. ISBN: 978-1-4327-4755-8.

Warner, L. S. and Tijerina, K.H. (2008). Indigenous Governance. In Culture and Tradition: Tribal Colleges and Universities at the Millennium. InfoAge Publishing. Charlotte, NC.

Warner, L. S. (2006). American Indian Women: Ways of Knowing, Ways of Leading. In Marge Karsten (Ed). Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the Workplace. Greenwood Press.

Warner, L. S. (2001). Assault against history: Pan-Indian Matriarchy and Euro-American Myths. In Thompkins, C. and O’Neal, S. (Eds.) Fight for the (M)other Self Behind Enemy Lines: Power, Myth and Cultural Consciousness Among Ethnic Third World Women. Wayne State University Press.

Warner, L. S. (1999). Education and the Law. In Swisher, K. G. and Tippeconnic, J. (Eds.) Next Steps: Research and Practice to Advance Indian Education. ERIC Clearinghouse, Part F, 26.pp. 53-80. ERIC/CRESS. Charleston, WV. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 427 905)

Technical Reports

Warner, L.S. (May 2015). Feasibility Study: The California Tribal College. For Naqmayam Communications, San Marcos, California.

Warner, L.S. (Spring, 2011). A Comparison of Native Studies Programs in Tribal Colleges. Northeastern A. & M. College, Miami, OK

Warner, L. S. (December 2009). Enrollment Management Strategic Plans: Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute. Self-study for Higher Learning Commission, Albuquerque, NM.

Tanner, G., Gipp, F., Warner, L.S. et al. (August 2009). Haskell Indian Nations University Self-Study for World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium, Accreditation Report; Belleville, Canada.

Quigley, L, Brown, D., Warner, L.S. et al. (May 2008)  Annual Report, National Advisory Council on Indian Education, 2007-2008, Department of Education, Washington, DC

Quigley, L, Brown, D., Warner, L.S. et al. (May 2007) Annual Report, National Advisory Council on Indian Education, 2006-2007. Department of Education, Washington, DC

Warner, L.S. et al (November, 2006). E-Learning and Textbook Costs in the Tennessee Board of Regents System. TBR. Nashville, TN

Baird, P. Warner, L. S., Short, R., Longfeather, C.(2006) American Indian Identity and student achievement.   Research Focus Red Paper Series.

Short, P.M., Hovda, R., Knight, H., and Warner, L.S. (2006). Teaching Quality in Tennessee: Dimensions for Success. Tennessee Board of Regents, Nashville, TN.

Warner, L.S. (Fall 2006). Regents and Research: Community College Partnerships and Collaborations, p. 34-41. Research TN. Nashville, TN.

Linquist-Mala, C., Quigley, L., Warner, L.S. et al. Annual Report, National Advisory Council on Indian Education, 2005-2006, Department of Education, Washington, DC.

Warner, L. S. et al (Fall 2005). Regents and Research: Statewide intellectual capacity and technological capability, p.34-41. Research TN. Nashville, TN.

Stanton, P., Short, P.M., Warner, L.S., and Giampapa, J. (March 2005). A Vision of Research and Graduate Education: Vision of Excellence Initiative. Tennessee Board of Regents. Nashville, TN.

Linquist-Mala, C., Quigley, L., Warner, L.S. et al. Annual Report, National Advisory Council on Indian Education 2004-2005, Department of Education, Washington, DC.

Warner, L. S. (2002, September 8-10) 3rd Annual Urban Indian Summit Conference Proceedings, pp. 1-40. Indian Community School of Milwaukee, Inc. Milwaukee, WI.

Warner, L. S. (2001, May 5-6) 2nd Annual Urban Indian Summit Conference Proceedings, pp. 1-30. Indian Community School of Milwaukee, Inc. Milwaukee, WI.

Warner, L. S. Faircloth, S., and Singer, C. (2000, March 10). Urban Indian Summit Conference Proceedings. pp. 1-60, Indian Community School of Milwaukee, Inc. Milwaukee, WI.

Warner, L. S., Deaton, B. J., Amey, M. and Briscoe, G. S. (2000) Navajo Nation Rural Systemic Initiative. pp.1-28. AIEC: Miami, OK.

Gipp, G. and Warner, L. S. (1998, February). Rural Systemic Initiatives Performance Effectiveness Review. pp 1-20. The National Science Foundation: Arlington, VA.

López-Ferrao, J.E. and Warner, L. S. (1998, January). Statewide Systemic Initiatives PER. pp.1-27. The National Science Foundation: Arlington, VA. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 417 964)

Warner, L. S. (1997, December). Rural Systemic Program Evaluation. pp. 1-15. The National Science Foundation: Arlington, VA.

Professional Journals[1]

Littleaxe, C. and Warner, L.S. (2014). Sacred Places: Indigenous Perspectives of Education and Place. Ed. Mark B. Spencer Conference proceedings from the Tenth Native American Symposium, Southeastern Oklahoma State University: Durant, OK

Warner, L. S. (2013). Recipes for Teaching Leadership to School Administrators. International Journal of Professional Management. 8(5). 42-55. Special Issue. ISSN 20422341 Ed. Caroline Bagshaw. http://jpmajournal.com/index.php

Warner, L.S. and Mackey, H. (2013). For Our Children: Influences of American Indian Education Policy. The Journal of Critical Thought & Praxis, Iowa State University.

Warner, L.S. (Winter 2012). As Teachers. Editor for Special Edition of The Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education. Texas A & M. University 25(7). p. iii

Warner, L. S. and Briscoe, G.S. (2012). Beloved Women: Female Influences on American Indian/Alaska Native Education Policy. Ed. Judit Kadar. Eger Journal of American Studies. Vol 19. Pp 703-719 Spring 2012. Eger, Hungary. ISBN 978-963-9894-99-0

Warner, L.S. and Grint, K. (2012). The Case of the Noble Savage: The Myth that Governance can replace Leadership. International Journal of Qualitative Studies. Special Edition on American Indian/Alaska Natives. 25 (7) Texas A & M University.

Short, R.J. and Warner, L.S. (Accepted for publication) Engagement, Identity, and Achievement in Urban American Indian Children. Journal of American Indian Education. Tempe, AZ.

Warner, L. S. & Grint, K. (2006) American Indian ways of leading and knowing. Leadership. 2 (2) 225-244.

Warner, L. S. (2006) Native Ways of Knowing: Let me count the ways. Canadian Journal of Native Education. 29 (2) 149-164.

Warner, L. S. (2006) The double bind for American Indian women: Two decades of inquiry. International Studies in Education Administration. CCEAM. 33 (2) 43-50.

Warner, L. S. (2004). A Comanche viewpoint. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education. 17 (3) May-June 2004. p. 382-385.

Warner, L. S. and Grint, K. (2004). Native ways of knowing: American Indian leadership and culture in Williamson, D. et al (Eds). Leadership Refrains: Encounters, Conversations, and Enchantments. Centre for Leadership Studies. University of Exeter, UK. ISBN 0-95-49155-O-X

Warner, L. S. (2001) Leadership issues and perspectives. In Journal of Professional Proceedings: School Administration Delegation to China. Barker, B. (Ed). People to People Ambassador Programs, Spokane WA.

Warner, L. S. (1998) Technology issues in Indian Country today. Wicazo Sa Review. 13.2 pp. 71-82. University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis, MN. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ 572 213)

Warner, L. S. (1998, September). USA Comparison: American Indian Education. Directions in Education. 7 (13) 3-4. Australian Council for Educational Administration.   University of Melbourne: Victoria, Australia.

Warner, L. S. and Hastings, J. (1995, Fall). A research study to determine perceptions of job-related stress by Bureau of Indian Affairs education employees. Journal of American Indian Education. 35, (1), 16-29. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ 522 016)

Warner, L. S. (1995, Winter). A study of the perceptions of Navajo school board members’ perceptions of American Indian and Non-Indian administrators. The Journal of Navajo Education. 12, (2), 26-31. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ 518 691)

Warner, L. S. (1995). A study of American Indian females in higher education administration. Initiatives: Journal of NAWE. 56 (4), 11-18. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ 504 687)

Nicksick, C. J., Willower, D. J., and Warner, L. S. (Fall/Winter, 1994). Female school principals on their work. Planning and changing: An Educational Leadership and Policy Journal. 25 (3/4) 150-160.

Warner, L. S. (1994, Fall). Mirror, mirror on the wall: Special Interests Groups in Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Educational Leadership.  14, 1, 29-31.

Warner, L. S. (1992, Spring). American Indian education: Culture and diversity in the 21st century. Thought and Action: NEA Journal for Higher Education, 3, (1), 61-72. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ 445 987)

Warner, L. S. (1984). Ethical considerations for planned social change in the education of American Indian people. Journal of Thought, 19 (3), 153-158.

Stansbury, K., Warner (Thomas), L. S. and Wiggins, T. (1984). Women in leadership and implications for affirmative action. Journal of Educational Equity and Leadership, 4 (2), 99-113.

Warner, L. S. (1980).The legal background of in loco parentis as applied to the education of American Indian children. Emergent Leadership, 4 (2), 24-31.

Warner, L. S. (1978, Summer). Minimum competency testing in the BIA. BIA Educational Research Bulletin. 3 (4) pp. 8-18. DOI: Washington, DC.

Presentations

International

Warner, L.S. and Briscoe, G.S. (2015). Storytelling: Teaching Tribal Youth Native Perspectives of History. Reflecting on Story’s Place in our Lives: The Storytelling Project: 8th Global Meeting. September 3-5, 2015. Mansfield College, Oxford, UK.

Proudfit, J. Turner, T., Warner, L.S. (2014). Assessing Tribal Cultural Needs in California. World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education 2014. May 23-29 204 Kapi’olani Community College, O’ahu, HI.

Warner, L.S. and Henson, A. (2011). Indian Preference in an Era of Self-Determination. 32nd American Indian Workshop. March 31-April 3, 2011, University of Graz, Austria.

Warner, L.S. and Grint, K. (2010). The Case of the Noble Savage: The Myth that Governance can replace Leadership. 9th International Conference on Studying Leadership: Missions, Myths and Mysteries. December 13-14, 2010. Lund University, Sweden.

Warner, L. S. and Briscoe, G. S.   (2010). Research Funding Strategies: Building Collaborative Partnerships. Future Without Poverty panel series in association with The Oklahoma Quiet Man Foundation. January 6-8, 2010, Ada, OK.

Warner, L. S. and Grint, K. (2008). Sacred Places: Indigenous Perspectives of Leadership. 7th International Conference on Studying Leadership. Locales of Leadership: Foregrounding Context. December 8-9, 2008, The University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Grint, K. and Warner, L. S. (2007). War and Peace: Leadership in American Indian Communities. 6th International Studying Leadership Conference: Purposes, Politics and Praxis December 13-14, 2007. Warwick Business School, Warwick, UK.

Warner, L. S.   (August 2007). Teaching Quality and Leadership. 2007 International Conference on Education Leadership: Improving Teaching and Learning, Beijing, China.

Warner, L. S. (July 2006). Indigenous Leadership. International Conference on Leadership in War and Peace. Cranfield University, Shrivenham, UK.

Grint, K., Warner, L.S., and Collison, D. (December 2006). The Language of Indigenous Leadership. International Conference on Studying Leadership: Knowledge into Action. Cranfield University-School of Management, Cranfield, UK.

Warner, L. S. (2005). Native Ways of Knowing: Let Me Count the Ways. Paper proposal submitted First Nations: First Thoughts, Centre of Canadian Studies, University of Edinburgh, 1-6 May, 2005. http://www.cst.ed.ac.uk/2005conference/papers/Warner_paper.pdf

Warner, L. S. and Grint, K. (2004). Native Ways of Knowing: American Indian Leadership and Culture. 3rd International Studying Leadership Conference, 15-16 December, 2004. University of Exeter, UK.

Warner, L. S. (2004). American Indian Women and Gender Stereotyping. The 2004 CCEAM Conference Secretariat, Center for Educational Leadership, The University of Hong Kong. Invited Panel: Multiple Voices on Gender Issues in Leadership. October 20-24, 2004, Hong Kong China.

Brinson, K. B. and Warner, L. S. (2004). Coyote Tales: Transferring American Indian Peoples’ Knowledge, Culture and Tradition. New Understandings in Educational Leadership and Management. The 7th International BELMAS Research Conference in partnership with Standing Conference on Research in Educational Leadership and Management. St. Catherine’s College. July 8-10, 2004. Oxford. United Kingdom.

Warner, L. S. and Brinson, K. B. (2004). Our Voices, Our Way: Research Methods for Indigenous Peoples. Crossing frontiers in quantitative and qualitative research methods. International Conference on Research Methods. Academy of Management, Research Methods Divisions and ISEOR. University of Lyon, March 18-20). Lyon, France.

Lewis, S. J. and Warner, L. S. (2003). Strategies for success with urban Indian students. Hawaii International Conference on Education. January 7-10, 2003. Honolulu, HI.

Warner, L. S. (2002). Indigenous Leadership Model. EIASM Leadership Research Conference, Oxford University, December 16-17, 2002. Oxford, England.

Brinson, K. B. and Warner, L. S.   (2002). School leadership in urban Indian schools. Paper presented at the Commonwealth Conference on Educational Administration and Management’s Exploring New Horizons in School Leadership for Democratic Schools. September 23-27, 2002. Umea University, Umea, Sweden.

Warner, L. S. and Wilson, M. D. (2002) Indigenous Education in Urban Indian America. Invited Paper presented at the Oxford Round Table at St. Anthony’s College, Oxford University. August 11-August 16, 2002. Oxford University, England.

Warner, L. S. (2002). Indigenous post graduate education.   Sixth triennial conference World Indigenous Peoples’ Conference: Education. The Answers Lie within Us. August 3-10, 2002. Stoney Indian Nations Reserve, Calgary Canada.

Petersen, G., Warner, L. S., and Briscoe, G.S. (2001) Violence and Suicide Intervention strategies for urban schools serving American Indian populations. Paper presented at The 19th International Conference of the Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism: Organization(s), Institutions and Violence. June 30th-July 4th, 2001. Trinity College, the University of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Warner, L. S. (2001, January) Leadership Issues and Perspectives.   Paper presented at the Beijing Education Administration College, People to People Ambassador Programs, January 9, 2001, Beijing, The People’s Republic of China.

Warner, L.S., Gipp, G., Deaton, B., and Briscoe, G.S. (2000, April) Education in rural communities: Systemic reform in indigenous schools. The Australian Indigenous Education Conference: Learning Better Together, April, 4-7, 2000, Fremantle, Western Australia.

Warner, L. S., Deaton B. and Briscoe, G. S. (1999, November) Higher education in rural communities: Systemic reform in indigenous schools. The International Council on Innovation in Higher Education Annual Meeting, October 31-November 3, 1999, San Juan, Puerto Rico. See Proceedings of the International Council on Innovation in Higher Education, Toronto, CA, 17, 167-171. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 438 113)

Warner, L. S. (1998, November) Indigenous education: Systemic change. ICIE XVI International Conference, November 1-5, 1998, Los Angeles, CA.

Warner, L. S. (1998, January). Leadership in systemic reform. Paper presented at the Eleventh International Conference Women in Higher Education hosted by The University of Texas-El Paso in San Francisco, CA. January 3-6, 1998.

Warner, L. S. (1997, October). Technology issues in Indian country today. Paper presented at the Interface Conference, Social and International Studies, Southern Polytechnic State University, Marietta, GA, October 15-17, 1997.

Warner, L. S. (1996, July). Cultural approaches to education. Crossroads in Cultural Studies: An International Conference, Tampere, Finland. July 1-4, 1996.

Warner, L. S. (1996, June). Exemplary practice: A study of current policy in American Indian education. Paper presented at the World Indigenous Peoples’ Conference: Education 1996. Albuquerque, NM. June 16-21, 1996. Proceedings Indigenous Education around the World In R. Barnhardt (Ed.) Center for Cross-Cultural Studies, University of Alaska: Fairbanks. Section 8 p. 56.

Warner, L. S. and Brown, D. (1995, July). Cognitive and cultural constructions: The first year experience. Paper presentation at the 8th International Conference—Global Perspectives on the First Year Experience. University of York, York, England, July 11-15, 1995. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 389 484).

Warner, L. S. (1994, June). Wearing buckskin on the silver screen. Paper accepted for presentation at the 11th International Symposium on Latin American Indian Literatures. McKeesport, PA. June 3-5, 1994.

Warner, L. S. (1993, December). An analysis of the effectiveness of tribal leadership on educational policy development in the United States.   Paper presented at the World Indigenous Peoples Conference: Education. The University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia. December 13-19, 1993.

Warner, L. S. (1992, January). A study of ethnic and sex-role stereotypes among American Indian women educational leaders. Paper presented at the 5th Annual International Conference, Women in Higher Education, San Diego, CA. January 4-6, 1992.

Warner, L. S. (1991, January). American Indian women in education: Stereotypes and Satisfaction. Paper presented at the Fourth Annual International Conference on Women in Higher Education, Hilton Head, S.C. Proceedings published by the University of Texas at El Paso, Women’s Studies Program. Pp. 200-212.

National/Regional

 Warner, L.S. and Briscoe, G.S. (2015). American Indian Leadership: Case Studies. 11th Native American Symposium. Native Leadership: Past, Present, Future. November 5-6, 2015, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant, OK.

Warner, L.S. (2015). The ABCs of Indian History: I is Not for Indian. Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges: Native Americans in the Midwest. Ohio Historical Society, August 2015, Columbus, OH.

Proudfit, J. and Warner, L.S. (2015). The Sounds of Silence: American Indian Women in Cinema. The Native American Literature Symposium. March 12-14, 2015. Isleta, New Mexico.

 Proudfit, J. and Warner, L.S. (2014). On Indian Ground: A Return to Indigenous Knowledge Generating Hope, Leadership and Sovereignty through Education in California. California Indian conference, October 9-11, 2014. California State University San Bernardino, CA.

 Warner, L.S. (2014). Creating Courses about Native American History, Experiences and Challenges. Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges: Native Americans in the Midwest. Ohio Historical Society, August, 2014, Miami, OK.

Proudfit, J. and Warner, L.S. (2014, July 10-12). The WEAVE Project. 5th American Indian/Indigenous Teacher Education Conference: Empowering Students, Empowering Communities. Northern Arizona University: Flagstaff, AZ.

Littleaxe, C. and Warner, L.S. (2013). Sacred Places: Indigenous Perspectives of Education and Place. Tenth Native American Symposium. Southwestern Oklahoma State University: Durant, OK.

Littleaxe, C. and Warner, L.S. (2013). Native ways of knowing in NASNTIs.  44th Annual National Indian Education Association Conference, Building Education and Communities, October 30-November 2, 2013, Rapid City, SD.

Warner, L. S. (2013). Using Native American History in Online Courses. Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges: Native Americans in the Midwest. Ohio Historical Society, August 13, 2013, Columbus, OH.

Warner, L. S. (2013). Infusing Native American History into your American Indian History Survey Class. Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges: Native Americans in the Midwest. Ohio Historical Society, August 13, 2013, Columbus, OH.

Fann, A., Warner, L.S., Lloyd, R., Gardener, K., and Secatery, S. (2013).  American Indian Transfer Summit. 11th Annual Conference. National Institute for the Study of Transfer Students. January 30-February 1, 2013, Frisco, TX.

Warner, L.S., Briscoe, G.S. II, and Briscoe, G.S. III. (2012)   Comes in Sight: Creating Literacy Opportunities for all Ages. 14th Annual Tar Creek Conference: Restoration, Reclamation, Resolution. September 26, 2012. Miami, OK.

 Warner, L.S. (June 2012). Native Ways of Knowing. Native Ways of Knowing: Classroom Strategies. Northeastern A & M. Junior College, Miami, OK.

Lloyd, R., Henderson, B., Arana, J. Bauer, J. and Warner, L.S. (2012) Native Opportunities for Retention and Success in Education. 3rd American Indian Teacher Education Conference, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ. July 13-14, 2012.

 Warner, L.S. (2012) Without Borders. Daughters of the American Revolution, Oklahoma State Convention, April 20, 2012. Tulsa: OK.

 Warner, L. S. (2012). Research As Activism. University of Texas-San Antonio. Women’s History Month Invited Lecture. March 5, 2012. San Antonio, TX.

 Warner, L.S. (2011). Opportunities and Challenges: American Indian Center for Excellence with Amy Fann, Susan Faircloth, Gerald E. Gipp, and Alfred Bryant: 400 Years of Challenges and Opportunities. ASHE Annual meeting, Charlotte, NC. November 16-19, 2011.

Warner, L. S. (2011). Literacy Bridge Books: Seaman’s Journey with Lewis & Clark. Abraham Coryell Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. October 4, 2011. Vinita, OK.

Warner, L.S. (2011). Teaching and Learning: Exploring Native Decision-Making. 12th American Indian Studies Association Conference. Native Planning: Aligning Decision-Making with our Original Instructions. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

 Warner, L. S. (2009). Leadership as Place: Indigenous Leadership Forum conversations with Research and Practitioners. Panel Discussion lead by Dorothy E. Aguilera, John Tippeconnic, III, and Timothy Begay. National Indian Education Association: Shaping Our Future Wisdomkeepers. 40th Annual Convention. October 23-26, 2009. Milwaukee, WI.

Warner, L. S. (2008). An Urban Indian School Model for Reform: Insuring quality academic programs and culturally appropriate design. New Metropolis Lecture Series, August 27, 2008, Virginia Tech University, Alexandria, VA.

Warner, L. S. (2008). Presidential Perspectives: Indigenous Research. Tribal College Forum VII, Climate Crises and Water Nations are Calling for an Awakening. August 13, 2008, Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence, KS.

 Hamley, J., Warner, L. S. (2008). Post-Secondary Choices for American Indian Students. Partnerships for Indian Education: National Conference on Indian Education. July 8-10, 2008, Rapid City, SD.

 Warner, L. S. (2008). First Language Use and Poverty in American Indian Communities. Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, National Poverty Center, June 30, 2008, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Warner, L. S. and Monteau, D. (2008). An Indigenous Critique of Western Organizational Theory. K’Bil Nazzti’i: Making Policy from Traditional Perspectives. June 18-20, 2008, Dine College, Tsaile, AZ.

Warner, L. S. (2008) Knowing Who We Are: Indigenous Pedagogy and Our Future. The Urban Indian Experience, April 10-11, 2008. The RED Center Research Series, Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence, KS.

Warner, L.S. (2008) Native Ways of Knowing and the Scientific Method. Climate Change and Tribal Environmental Services Annual Meeting. Haskell Indian Nations University, April 1, 2008. Lawrence, KS.

Warner, L. S. (2008). Holistic Education-Native Ways of Knowing. World Without Poverty. January 12, 2008. Comanche Nation College, Lawton, OK.

Warner, L. S. (2007). Transition to Post-Secondary Education. Partnerships for Student Success: First Annual Bureau of Indian Education Partnership Conference. July 24-26, 2007. Denver, CO.

Warner, L. S. and Short, R. J.   (2007, June). A Conversation on Cultural Outcomes. Assessment and Research Institute for Tribal Colleges. Haskell Indian Nations University, Lawrence, KS.

 Warner, L. S. (2007, March). A Comparison of Native American Culture and Tradition in Film and in Contemporary Life. Dyersburg State Community College, Dyersburg, TN.

 Warner, L. S. (2006, October) Research and performance: Strategies for Program Improvement. TBR Center of Excellence/Center of Emphasis Annual Meeting, Nashville, TN.

 Warner, L. S. (2005, February) Native Ways of Knowing: Research and Scholarship in Indian Country. 26th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular and American Culture Association annual meeting. Albuquerque, NM.

Warner, L. S. (2005, January) American Indian culture and values today. BSA University. Tennessee Technology University, Cookeville, TN.

 Warner, L. S. (2003, November)   Sponsored Research Programs. University Council for Education Administration, Annual Meeting, Portland, OR.

Warner, L. S. (2003, April 26). Diversity and Educational Research. David L. Clark Graduate Student Research Seminar in Educational Leadership and Policy, UCEA Forum at the American Education Research Association, Chicago, IL.

Short, R.J., Warner, L.S., and Short, P. M. (2003, April). Engagement, Identity, and Achievement in Urban American Indian Children. American Education Research Association, Chicago, IL.

 Warner, L. S. (2003, February 26). Who Benefits from a Failing Urban School District? UWM Department of Multicultural Affairs, Institute on Multicultural Relations and the Milwaukee Urban League, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, WI.

 Warner, L. S. and Briscoe. G. S. (2002) Tradition and culture in an urban Indian environment. Paper presented at Celebrating Indigenous Lives Conference, University of Arkansas-Little Rock, November 14-16, 2002. Little Rock, AR.

Brinson, K.B. and Warner, L. S. (2002) Exploring the Leadership, Culture, and Climate in an Indian Community School. UCEA Annual Meeting, Fostering Learning for All: Honoring Multiple Leadership Perspectives. November 1-3, 2002. Pittsburgh, PA.

Warner, L. S. and Wilson, M. D. (2002) The image of urban Indians in the American imagination. The Newberry Library Fall Symposium Series. October 2, 2002. Chicago, IL.

Short, R. J. and Warner, L. S. (2002, September 8-10) American Indian Identity in an urban Indian elementary school. 3nd Annual Urban Indian Summit. Indian Community School of Milwaukee, Inc., Milwaukee, WI.

Short, R.J., Roper, J, Fleming, P., Guiling, S., and Warner, L. S. (2002, August) Connectedness, Race, SES, and Achievement in School-Age Children. American Psychological Association Annual meeting, August 22-25, 2002. Chicago, IL.

Warner, L. S., Short, R.J., Wilson, M.D. (2002). Instructional practices: their relationship to student engagement and identity. The annual National Indian School Board Association meeting, “Creating Sacred Places”, July 19-25, 2002. St. Louis, MO.

Warner, L. S., Couchman, L. J. and Barr, C. (2002) Urban Indian Education. Native Educators’ Conference. Nurturing Continuous Growth.   February 3-5, 2002. Anchorage, AK.

Warner, L.S., Deaton, B.J., Briscoe, G.S. (2001) Predicting economic change based on academic success for American Indians/Alaska Native students in rural schools. The 93rd Annual National Rural Education Association Convention. Rural Education: Celebrating Diversity. October 24-27, 2001, Albuquerque, NM.

Briscoe, G.S., Warner, L.S., and Wilson, M.D. (2001) The Impact of Technology in Rural Reservation schools. The 93rd Annual National Rural Education Association Convention. Rural Education: Celebrating Diversity. October 24-27, 2001, Albuquerque, NM.

Warner, L.S. (2001, August) An evaluation of American Indian curriculum inclusion at the Indian Community School of Milwaukee. Standards based Native American inclusion in math and science. NahTahWahshPsa August l3-17, 2001, Hannehville, MI.

Warner, L. S. (2001, April) Accountability and assessment for today’s schools. MIRSI Spring Leadership Institute, April 25-27, 2001, Gaylord, MI.

Warner, L. S., LaCourte, J. and Cornelius, W. (2000, July) Won in the Classroom: A rubric for culturally appropriate materials in an American Indian classroom. Wisdom and courage: Foundations for school change. National Indian School Board Association, July 26-30, 2000 Phoenix, AZ.

Warner, L. S. (2000, July). Urban Indian education: Research issues for a new agenda. Wisdom and courage: Foundations for school change. National Indian School Board Association, July 26-30, 2000 Phoenix, AZ.

Warner, L. S. (2000, May) Invited Response to Rick St. Germaine’s paper: A chance to go full circle: Building on reforms to create effective learning. National American Indian and Alaska Native Education Research Agenda Conference.   Department of Education, May 30-June 1, 2000, Albuquerque, NM.

Warner, L. S. and Swisher, K.G. (2000, April). An Urban Indian Education Research Agenda. Wisconsin Indian Education Association Annual Meeting, April 17, 2000. Milwaukee, WI.

Warner, L. S. (2000, March). Research and practice in Urban Indian education. Urban Indian Summit, March 9-10, 2000, Milwaukee, WI.

Warner, L. S. and Briscoe, G.S. (1999, October) Urban Indian education. National Indian Education Association Annual Meeting, October 18-21, 1999, Oklahoma City, OK.

Deaton, B. J., Briscoe, G.S. and Warner, L. S.   (1999, October) Research and evaluation in rural communities: A systemic approach. The Rural Education Research Forum in conjunction with the National Rural Education Association Annual Meeting, October 13-17, 1999, Colorado Springs, CO.

Warner, L. S. (1999, May). An evaluation of technology in Indian Country. Presentation at Digital Council Fires, National Indian Telecommunications Institute Conference, Albuquerque, NM.

Warner, L.S. (1998, September).   Lessons from urban reform for Indian country: The El Paso Model. Presentation at the El Paso Urban System Initiative, The University of Texas-El Paso, September 10-12, 1998, El Paso, TX.

Warner, L. S. (1998, February). Judging progress toward the classroom vision: The assessment of student achievement in science and mathematics. The 1998 Science and Mathematics Education Leadership Institute for Systemic Reform. February 18-21, 1998. Washington, DC.

Warner, L.S. (1997, July). Systemic initiatives in math and science. National Indian School Board Association Stewards of the Sacred, Snowmass, CO, July 27-31, 1997.

Warner, L. S. (1997, March). The role of federal agencies in the development of tribal telecommunications policy. Four Corners Technology Conference. Northern Arizona University, Shiprock Campus, NM. March 26-27, 1997.

Warner, L. S. (1997, February). American Indian students in American education: Best practice. Paper presented at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education annual meeting, Phoenix, AZ. February 27-28, March 1, 1997.

Warner, L. S. (1996, October). Theoretical model for research on leadership in Indian education. Paper presented at the National Indian Education Association 27th annual meeting, Rapid City, SD. October 12-16, 1996.

Warner, L. S. (1996, April). A comparative study of Bureau of Indian Affairs’ principals and public school principals’ leadership styles. Paper presented at the American Education Research Association Annual Meeting. New York, NY.

Warner, L. S. (1996, February) Indigenous education systems. UKAN Conference. National Science Foundation. Gallup, NM. February 2-4, 1996.

Brinson, K., Alston, J. and Warner, L. S. (1995, November). The emergence of race and gender litigation in American education. Paper presented at NOLPE 1995, 41st Annual Convention, Kansas City, Missouri. November 16-19, 1995.

Alston, J., Brinson, K. and Warner, L. S. (1995, May). When The Supreme Court comes knockin’ on the school house gate. Paper presentation at the New England Education Research Organizational Annual Meeting, Portsmouth, NH, May 3-5, 1995.

Warner, L. S. (1995, April) Exemplary practices from the nation: American Indian Leadership Program. Presented at the Multicultural Summit, April 27-28, 1995. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Warner, L. S. (1994, November). The impact of federal legislation on the education of American Indian students. Paper presented at the National Organization for Legal Problems in Education Conference, San Diego, CA. November 17-19, 1994. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 378 013)

Cooke, K. and Warner, L. S. (1994, October). An analysis of teachers’ perceptions of principals’ instructional leadership styles in Bureau of Indian Affairs and Tribal Contract Schools. Paper presented at the 25th University Conference of the National Indian Education Association, St. Paul, MN. October 16-20, 1994.

Warner, L. S. and Amey, M. J. (1994, September). ‘Dances with Wolves’: Understanding Others. Paper presented at the Eighth Annual Conference on Women in Educational Administration: Leadership and Change. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE. September 18-19, 1994.

Warner, L. S. (1994, June). Creating Change through Tradition. Paper accepted for presentation at the Women’s Leadership Institute, Wells College, Aurora, NY. June 10-12, 1994.

Warner, L. S. (1994, April). The legal framework for parental involvement in the education of American Indian students. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting. New Orleans, LA. April 2-9, 1994. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 369 641)

Warner, L. S. (1994, April). American Indian women supervisors in educational organizations. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. April 2-9, 1994.

Warner, L. S. and Amey, M. J. (1994, March). Yes, I did see ‘Dances with Wolves.’ Paper presented at the National Association of Women in Education Conference. Washington, DC. March 2-6, 1994.

Warner, L. S. (1994, February). “…the hearts of its women”. Paper presented at the Third Wave: (In)Visible Women Conference. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA. February 25-27, 1994.

Warner, L. S. (1993, March). Cultural implications of conflict resolution. Paper accepted at the Adults of Color in Higher Education: An Institutional Response Conference. The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. March 19-20, 1993.

Warner, L. S. (1992, September). Dispute resolution in education. Paper presented at the 6th Annual Women in Educational Administration Conference, Blending Theory and Practice: The Educational Administrator in the 21st Century. University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE. September 27-28, 1992. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 3346 596)

Warner, L. S. (1992, April). Cultural implications of dispute resolution. Paper accepted at the Conference on Education Leadership and Social Responsibility, Monmouth College, West Long Branch, New Jersey. April 10-12, 1992.

Warner, L. S. and Hawkins, R.A. (1992, April). Cultural implications of dispute resolution. Paper presented at the Women’s Research Conference, “Women and Diversity”, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. April 8-10, 1992.

Warner, L. S. (1992, March). Matriarchal decision-making. Paper presented at the 1992 NAWE Conference Colors of the Heart, San Antonio, TX. March 4-7, 1992. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 345 901)

Warner, L. S. (1992, March). Dispute resolution in education. Paper presented at the 1992 NAWE Conference Colors of the Heart, San Antonio, TX. March 4-7, 1992.

Warner, L. S. (1991, September). Educational facility planning. Paper presented at 1991 Conference on Women in Educational Administration, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE.

Warner, L. S. (1991, June). Red women, white policy. Paper presented at Marist College Women and Society Conference, Poughkeepsie, NY. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 339 563)

Warner, L. S. (1991, April). From King Arthur to Uncle Tom. Paper presented at Pace University conference Administrative Leadership: Lessons from liberal learning. White Plains, NY. In Murray, N. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Conference on Administrative Leadership—Lessons from Liberal Learning. (pp. 351-359) White Plains, NY: Dyson Center for Applied Ethics, Pace University Press.

Warner, L. S. and Hastings, J. (1991, April). American Indian education: Culture and diversity in the 21st century. Paper presented at Arizona State University-West, 21st Century Project. “Culture and Diversity: Teaching, Learning & the Curriculum for the 21st Century University, Phoenix, AZ. April 7-9, 1991. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 331 664)

Warner, L. S. (1991, March) Equity and stereotypes. Paper presented at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Association of School Administrators, New Orleans, LA.

Warner, L. S. and Seaberg, J. J. (1990, April). Stereotyping and job satisfaction among American Indian female supervisors. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Division A. Boston, MA. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 334 029)

 Invited Addresses

 Warner, L.S. (2012) Native Ways of Knowing: Indigenous Andragogy. College of Education, University of Houston-Clear Lake, November 29, 2012. Houston, TX

Warner, L. S. (2012)   Leadership: Indigenous Perspectives of Place. University of Houston-Clear Lake. November 28, 2012. Houston, TX.

Warner, L.S. (2012). Comanche Core Values: Defining Success. Top Ten Freshman Academy, Northeastern Oklahoma A & M, November 5, 2012.   Miami, OK.

Warner, L.S. (2012). Native Ways of Knowing: NORSE. Northeastern A & M. Junior College. August 14, 2012. Miami, OK.

 Warner, L.S. (2012). Native Ways of Knowing: American Indian Traditions. Northeastern A. & M. Junior College. E.D.U.C.A.T.E. ME Academy. June 27, 2012. Miami, OK.

Warner, L. S. (2012). Beloved Women: American Indian Women Educators. University of Texas-San Antonio. Women’s History Month Invited Lecture. March 5, 2012. San Antonio, TX.

Warner, L.S. (2010, March. Research as Activism. Symposium Series commemorating The Pennsylvania State University’s 40 years of Service to Indian Nations. Penn State University, State College, PA.

Warner, L.S. (November 6, 2009). American Indian Art Galleries: The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Kansas City, MO.

Warner, L.S. (September 16, 2009). Partnering with Tribal Colleges and Universities and local community colleges to support professional development in CCDF programs. Tribal CCDF Management Institute. Hosted by Department of Health and Human Services, St. Louis, MO.

Warner, L.S. (2009). Indigenous Controlled Higher Education: Haskell’s Legacy.  Invited Roundtable hosted by Brian McDougall, special Advisor, Learning Policy Directorate, HRSDC, Ottawa, CA.

Warner, L. S. (2009) Legacy as Place: Shaping American Indian Higher Education. 37th Annual Symposium on the American Indian—Legacy: 1909-2009. Northeastern State University, April 15-18, 2009, Tahlequah, OK.

 Warner, L. S. (2009) Resiliency in Higher Education: Personal Perspectives. Native American in Higher Education: Current Issues and Future Directions Symposium. Commission on Multicultural Understanding, February 5, 2009. University of Indiana, Bloomington, IN.

Warner, L. S. (2008) Census 2010. Regional 7 Census Bureau,   April 1, 2008. Kansas City, Missouri.

Warner, L.S. (2008). Connecting the Circle. Symposium for the Recruitment & Retention of Students of Color. April 20-22, 2008. Kansas City, MO.

Warner, L.S. (2008). Culture and Context: Urban American Indians. The Endicott Society. April 7, 2008. Lawrence, KS.

Warner, L.S. (2008). Academic All-Stars-Lawrence Journal World. March 5, 2008. Lawrence, KS.

Warner, L.S. (2005). American Indian Communities and Leadership. The University of Lancaster, Center for Leadership. May 10, 2004, Lancaster, UK.

Warner, L. S. (2004). American Indian Women and Gender Stereotyping. The 2004 CCEAM Conference Secretariat, Center for Educational Leadership, The University of Hong Kong. Invited Panel: Multiple Voices on Gender Issues in Leadership. October 20-24, 2004, Hong Kong, China.

Warner, L. S. (2002, November) Coyote Tales. Keynote: National Indian Education Association Annual Meeting, November 1-5, 2002. Albuquerque, NM.

Warner, L. S. (2002, April) Remembering Our Past. Wisconsin Indian Education Association Annual Meeting, April 6-9, 2002. Lac du Flambeau, WI.

Warner, L. S. (2002, February) A Cultural Model for Performance. Native Educators’ Conference- Nurturing Continuous Growth, February 3-5, 2002, Anchorage, AK.

Warner, L.S. (2001, November) Urban Indian Education and Research Imperatives. National Education Association, Native American Issues in Education Panel, November 8, 2001, Washington, D.C.

Warner, L. S. (2000, August) Urban Indian Education. Keynote Address. Colorado Indian Education Association meeting: Teaching American Indian Students Next Steps. August 3-4, 2000, Denver, Colorado.

Warner, L. S.   (2000, February). American Indian Women’s Leadership Model. Mt. Mary College, Leadership Lecture Series, February l4, 2000, Milwaukee, WI.

Brown, D. F., Warner, L. S., Briscoe, G. S. and Deaton, B.J. (1999, December) An evaluation study of American Indian/Alaska Native Rural Systemic Initiatives. Invited session, Conference of SI Research/Evaluative/Impact Studies. REC. NSF, December 13-14, 1999, Arlington, VA.

Warner, L. S. (l998, April). The American Indian/Alaska Native Context in Rural Systemic Reform. The National Education Association, April 9, 1998. Washington, D.C.

Warner, L. S. and Buller, K. (1996, April). World Indigenous Peoples’ Conference: Education 1996. The United Nations’ Human Rights Committee on the Decade of Indigenous Peoples. April 11, 1996. New York, NY.

Warner, L. S. (1996, January). Indigenous Knowledge Systems. The New Mexico House of Representatives invited testimony. Santa Fe, NM.

Warner, L. S. and Noley, G. B. (1995, October). American Indian Leadership Program Review, University Council of Education Administration. Annual Meeting Salt Lake City, UT.

Warner, L. S. (1994 October). The impact of federal legislation on the education of American Indian students. Minnesota Indian Law Student Association, The University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

Warner, L. S. (1993, Summer). American Indian Women and Leadership in Education. The Pennsylvania State University’s Invited Scholar Program. August 3, 1993. University Park, PA.

 ADDITIONAL PUBLICATIONS

 Tahdooahnippah, V. J. “Lightening.” Portmanteau May 2013:

Tahdooahnippah, V. J. “One Student.” Portmanteau May 2013:

Tahdooahnippah, V. J. “Charles Banks Wilson.” Portmanteau May 2013:

—2013. “Battles.” Social Justice Issues and Racism in the College Classroom: Perspectives from Different Voices.   Patricia G. Boyer & Dannielle Joy Davis (Eds). p.134. Emerald Publishing: UK.

 —2010. “Grandmother.” First Place in Chapters Bookstore Annual Poetry Contest, Spring, 2010. Miami, OK.

—-2005. “Navajoland.” Cold Mountain Review. Appalachian State University, NC. Fall, 2005. Volume 34, No 1, Page 8.

—-2004. “I am forever.” Journal of Qualitative Studies. University of Texas-Austin, TX. May-June 2004. Volume 17, No.3,

—-2004. “Who Lays the Railroads.” Journal of Qualitative Studies. University of Texas-Austin, TX. May-June 2004 Volume 17, No.3,

 —-1997. “A Child.” The Cimarron Review. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.

—-1997.   “Palo Duro.” The Cimarron Review. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.

—-1997. “Freedom.” The Cimarron Review. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.

—-1997. January/March. “Pratt.” The Journal of Qualitative Studies. University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX. p. 62, Vol 10, #1.

—-1995. “Navajo Boy.” Pen and Ink Magazine. Ann Arbor, MI. Fall/Winter 1995-96. P. 7.

—-1994. “North Star.” Sweetgrass Review. Green Bay, August/September.   WI P. 2. .

—-1994. “Workers.” Sweetgrass Review. Green Bay, WI. March/April. P.2.

—-1991. “New Mexico.” Minority Voices, Spring. University Park, PA. p. 49, Vol 7, #2.

—-1985. “Inky.” These Hearts, These Poems. Simon Ortiz, Editor. Pueblo of Acoma Press: Acoma, NM.

—-1985. “Lost Eyes.” These Hearts, These Poems. Simon Ortiz, Editor. Pueblo of Acoma Press: Acoma, NM.

—-1985. “Let the Record Stand.” These Hearts, These Poems. Simon Ortiz, Editor. Pueblo of Acoma Press: Acoma, NM.

—-1985. “Grandfather.” These Hearts, These Poems. Simon Ortiz, Editor. Pueblo of Acoma Press: Acoma, NM.

—-1985. “It Used to Be.” Akwekon June. Akwesasne Press: Rooseveltown, NY. , #2/3.   p. 104.

—-1985. “Battles.” Akwekon June. Akwesasne Press: Rooseveltown, NY. #2/3. p. 104.

—-1978. “Bridges.” Shush. Spring. Jostens: Wingate, NM. p. 5.

—–1970. “A hole.” Phoenix 5, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK. #7. p. 13.

—-1970. “They were only seventeen.” Phoenix 5.Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK. #7 , p. 14.

—–1970. “A Sign.” Phoenix 5.Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK. #7, p. 27.

—–1970. “Ignorant.” Phoenix 5. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK. #7, p. 28.

—–1969. “Restless Furor.” Phoenix 5. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK.#7 , p.8.

—-1969. “today.” Phoenix 5. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK. #7, p. 16.

—-1969. “The Stranger”. Phoenix 5. Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK. #7. p. 37.

[1] Refereed titles in Bold