Fourth International CREA Conference

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). Early registration rate deadline AUGUST 25, 2017

*More info to come!

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

Register Now! CREA Conference

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). Early registration rate deadline AUGUST 25, 2017

*More info to come!

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

CREA Call for Papers Deadline Extended to February 27!

After numerous requests, “for just a little more time”, we have decided to extend the deadline (February 20, 2017) for the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) 4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times call for papers (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ) to February 27, 2017.

We are also very pleased to announce that: Drs. Teresa LaFromboise (Professor of Developmental & Psychological Sciences, Graduate School of Education, and Chair Native American Studies, Stanford University) https://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/lafrom; Robin L. Miller (Professor of Ecological-Community, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University) http://psychology.msu.edu/Faculty/FacultyMember.aspx?netid=mill1493; and Guillermo Solano-Flores (Professor of Developmental & Psychological Sciences, Graduate School in Education, Stanford University)https://ed.stanford.edu/faculty/gsolanof  are confirmed to deliver keynote addresses with Dr. Ernie House (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder) also delivering a featured plenary session presentation.

As expected, many are strongly resonating with the conference theme and purpose statement that is guiding our preparation. We are looking forward to the symposia, papers, and roundtable discussions that will also make major contributions to the work we must undertake during our time together.  This excitement is further amplified as a result of the American Evaluation Association’s Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues) to be held on September 28 in conjunction with our conference, as well as in San Antonio during the time of the AERA Annual Meeting.

Please share this information with your respective networks and we look forward to your submissions as well as seeing you at the conference. If you have any questions or difficulty with our proposal submission or conference registration system do not hesitate to contact us at: crea@education.illinois.edu

No More PRANKS-Giving: How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Koolamalsi njoos (Greetings, colleagues and friends):image1

As the newest Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Affiliate Researcher, I represent the oldest and least known communities on Turtle Island and Mother Earth: Indigenous people.  My Indigenous ancestors and relatives are on nii nooxw waak nii numoxoomus (my father Peter Bowman’s and my grandfather Morris Bowman’s) side of the family. Neekaawa Lunaapeewook waak Mohiikaneewi (they are Lenaape-Munsee and Mohican Indians).  Mohican (not the “last of” thank you very much) and Lenni-Lunaape Munsee (we were “renamed” “Delaware Indians” as we were “relocated” by the Europeans post-contact) are my Indigenous family and community members who arrived on this continent thousands of years prior to European contact in the 1400s, according to our oral traditions. For the reader’s convenience, I will continue the rest of this discussion in the language the colonial people forced upon Indigenous people when they arrived at and conquered Turtle Island (English).

We need to stop Pranksgiving, and this time of year gives us a chance to rethink Columbus and beyond!  So, as we embark on yet another “Thanksgiving” and Native American history “month” I’d like to offer a different, historical Indigenous perspective, “re-writing and re-righting” (Smith, 1999) the western narrative that the American story began when Columbus or Henry Hudson got here, and adding to or correcting the discourse and printed content which often excludes, is ignorant of, or provides a romanticized and incorrect version of Indigenous people’s perspectives, experiences, and contributions.  We were here before European contact, we’re still here surviving and thriving, and we will continue correcting the information regarding our Indigenous communities’ contributions to contemporary contexts.  This includes the wisdom and content that Indigenous people provide to modern-day educational, academic, governance, and other disciplines, topics, and contexts.

I am proud to be part of an evaluation community at CREA that is leading the way to encompass the history, values, perspectives, strengths, and contributions that our collective and strong diversity represents.  Some of these evaluation roots date back decades and some trace back centuries.  Others are unknown and/or are being re-awakened, recovered, and revived as we strive to understand our origin stories and the cultural, historical, and intellectual traditions of our Indigenous relatives and ancestors.  Undoubtedly, our awakening process is as critical to what we create as evaluators: designs, studies, publications, presentations, trainings, and transformative change that are sustained by the communities we humbly serve.  The journey as well as all the people, places, projects, and insights along the way provide a rich context in which we situationally understand more about ourselves, our traditions, our communities, and our broader academic context.

When the historical, contextual, technical, and content knowledge of Indigenous and underrepresented people is not woven into the more contemporary evaluation fabric, we are in conflict and ignoring the very mission, vision, values, and goals that our professional evaluation community (AEA) is supposed to uphold.  If we are to improve, increase, promote, and support activities that make for more effective evaluators and evaluations then as a profession, we must acknowledge, accept, and address the severe lack of equity, inclusion, ethical consideration, and legal protections critically missing from most evaluation activities, curriculum, studies, and discourse.

Current controversy provides a significant example for reflection and consideration.  Within both Indigenous and academic communities, I am often asked about the conflict surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and the #NoDAPL counter-movement launched by human, water, and earth rights protectors from Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.  #NoDAPL seeks to block a $3.8B, 1,100-mile fracked-oil pipeline currently under construction from the Bakken shale fields of North Dakota to Peoria, Illinois. DAPL is slated to cross Lakota Treaty Territory at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where it would be laid underneath the Missouri River, the longest river on the continent, endangering a source of fresh water for the Standing Rock Sioux and 8 million people living downstream. DAPL would also impact many sites that are sacred to the Standing Rock Sioux and other Indigenous nations.

As a culturally responsive community, and as competent and skilled evaluators, we all must understand the cultural, contextual, historical, and legal implications of DAPL and similar projects with Indigenous communities and Tribal nations.  This is one reason why the Indigenous origin stories must be part of the broader evaluation narrative so our “intellectual” evaluative foundations are aware, accurate, informed, inclusive, comprehensive, responsive, and responsible for situating our practice within a much longer and mostly unknown, destructive history than our contemporary publications, agencies, and evaluators acknowledge. Claiming expertise, ignorance, or other falsehoods is not acceptable if we profess to be a global evaluation community.

Like many projects – research, evaluation, and otherwise – conducted with Indigenous people, DAPL has deep, destructive, and illegal historical roots.  The project is in violation of treaty rights afforded the Standing Rock Sioux as a sovereign nation, reflecting the lack of recognition of Tribes as sovereign nations that stretches back to the earliest treaties enacted in 1774 between colonists and Indigenous Tribal nations.  How many research and evaluation projects have been enacted with Indigenous communities to “extract” knowledge and data without due consideration for Indigenous ownership of that knowledge and data?  Far too many!  And this must stop, for ethical, moral, legal, and professional reasons.

Reflecting on the DAPL project reminds us that our broader evaluation community is also about power, networks, and resources.  The perspectives and experiences of the “others” or “have nots” is greatly underreported in our evaluation, academic, education, and other contexts.  We only need to look at who gets funded, published, promoted, elected, or represented on key commissions, editorial review boards, or attends “invite only” events to see that while we talk about inclusion, equity, and diversity, there is little evidence of it in our “community” of practice.  What business interests, amount of dedicated resources, and professional practices are most prevalent in our evaluation community?  It depends on whose conference and what context you are in.  But the interests, practices and viewpoints of Indigenous and other marginalized groups are consistently and significantly absent!

DAPL and the #NoDAPL movement also remind us that our broader evaluation community privileges the written word and values certain evaluation voices – largely white and male – more than others.  A content analysis of AEA journals and evaluation published literature from the 1970s to the present (n=3,305 articles) demonstrates racialized and cultural incongruence issues that are consistently seen between program participants and evaluators stemming from white privilege, wealth inequities, and inequitable distribution of wealth along cultural lines in the United States.  Similar inequities appear when we consider whose voices are heard and respected in discussion around the DAPL project.  For example, DAPL was originally routed through Bismarck, ND, but was redirected in response to the voices of the powerful and political concerns of a municipality over drinking water.  However, voices against the inequitable, unethical, and unlawful treatment of a sovereign Tribal nation remain unheard, not covered by mainstream media as human or environmental concerns.  I welcome emerging voices that tell different stories in different ways – voices like those of Carl Sack, a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who is using critical cartography as a culturally-responsive and scientifically-sound method to provide a counter-narrative to the lack of media coverage of the historic, Indigenous and #NoDAPL perspective.

 

black-snake

Figure 1.  Sack, C. (2016). The Black Snake in Sioux country: showing the Dakota Access Pipeline reroute through unceded treaty lands and its consequences.   Retrieved from https://northlandia.wordpress.com/2016/11/01/a-nodapl-map/

Where are the social justice evaluators and researchers?  Who will give voice to the historic and contemporary experiences and stories of the people, land, and destruction based on forced removal and contemporary trauma and violence stemming from DAPL? How is our evaluation community holding up the mission of “generating knowledge about effective human action” when we can’t even make a joint statement about #NoDAPL, let alone send a commissioned group of evaluators to ND?  Surely, the Canadian Evaluation Society and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission give us an example of how that is done!   Inclusion and action are the responsibility of everyone who claims to be a principled evaluator within the larger the evaluation profession.  Yes, YOU are being called to action because knowing better should mean doing better!  Standing Rock is just another contemporary example of centuries of injustices, destruction, trauma, and death dealt out to Indigenous people where most of the world stood by.  I am asking you at #NoDAPL and in other contexts to stand with us as global academic #warriors in solidarity as together as transformative evaluators.  In turn, you too will be transformed.

The bottom line is that I feel at home with CREA.  This is the interdependent place where we engage as family to draw enlightenment, continue to grow, and gather support from all races, ethnicities, contexts, cultures, socio-economic, gender, orientation, different abilities, and other diversity components as strengths to stand with us on the front lines.  Processing our ancient pain or contemporary trauma continues to be largely minimized, ignored, denied, and/or aggressively blocked by most post-contact people, institutions, literature, and systems.  Truly this can be paralyzing at times, and is a problem compounded by the low numbers of Indigenous academics who can add our communities’ voices to the mainstream narrative. So we need support, solidarity, and collegial partnerships.  CREA provides the place for speaking, sharing, and celebrating all that our community brings to evaluation; it is only through the stories, sacrifices, struggles, teachings and strengths of our ancestors/relatives coupled consciously and courageously with our CREA community that many of us Indigenous academics can continue.

In closing, I offer my perspective in the most humble and sacred way.  My words and vulnerabilities are my perspectives alone and are shared within context knowing that some of my Indigenous relatives died on the longest Trail of Tears journeys, were raped and killed by colonists, and continue to be treated as sub-humans suffering, traumatized, and dying on the lands that we were forced to move onto.  Yet we find ways to survive contribute and thrive.  As Waapalaneexkweew (Flying Eagle Woman; Accompanied by the Four Eagles), it is my responsibility to use my life to keep telling our origin and contemporary stories until the day Creator takes me back to the spirit world.  And from my deeply grateful heart, I’m so honored that we’ve created more academic, educational, and community spaces to share the truths of Indigenous perspectives that will continue transform us towards a more equitable and empowered future. I feel your strength, my beautiful CREA family, and I know Indian Country does too.  Anushiik (thank you) for being in it with us for the long haul.  We are one Tribe walking the Red Road, so see you soon.

Sincerely, Critically, and Indigenously Yours,

Waapalaneexkweew and my English name is Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape), PhD

Evaluator & Researcher, University of Wisconsin-Madison (www.wcer.wisc.edu/)

President, Bowman Performance Consulting, Shawano WI (www.bpcwi.com)

If you’d like more information to contextualize my comments, I suggest the following:

 

Bigelow & Peterson (Eds.). (2003). Rethinking Columbus. Milwaukee, WI:  Rethinking Schools.

Deloria, V. (1988). Custer died for your sins: An Indian manifesto; with new preface. Norman: University of Oklahoma.

Deloria, V. (1995). Red earth, white lies: Native Americans and the myth of scientific fact. New York: Scribner.

Hood, S., Hopson, R. K., & Frierson, H. T. (2015). Continuing the journey to reposition culture and cultural context in evaluation theory and practice.  Greenwich CT:  Information Age Publishing.

Tuhiwai Smith, L. (1999). Decolonizing methodologies: research and Indigenous peoples. Dunedin, New Zealand: Zed Books Limited.

Dr. Bowman on CREA Blog

manulani-and-nicky_orig

Dr. Aluli-Meyer reminded us about the importance of transformative epistemologies that incorporate ways of knowing, ways of being, and ways of doing. She encouraged us as students of culturally responsive evaluation and assessment to challenge narrow cultrocentric standards and ideas that limit our ability, and tap into the brilliance of our mind, body, and spirit!

In leaving the Palmer house with Joe O’Hara (Dublin City University) and Alfredo Artiles (Arizona State U) on the Friday after the closing keynote, I knew I had been CREA’ed – that sense of having been at a special place where something special happened.  In fact, the gathering of this group of interdisciplinary and intergenerational scholars at that particular place of city, in this particular social, political, economic global milieu is historic, agenda and precedent setting, and worthy of continual repeating.

I recall hearing a colleague say at the inaugural conference that these are all the people you go to see at AEA and now they are all in the same room.  I also recall one of the keynote speakers from the inaugural conference, Eric Jolly (Science Museum of Minnesota), suggesting that the knowledge base in that room at CREA could essentially contribute to rewriting and rethinking research and evaluation agendas in major philanthropic, academic, government, and community board rooms around the country and potentially the world.  I believe him and I can’t wait until the 4th International conference!

Author

Rodney Hopson is a professor at George Mason University and Faculty Affiliate, UIUC – CREA

 

*Original post found here.

CREA Partners with Evaluation 2016 in Atlanta

BPC is very pleased to announce CREA’s second partnership with AEA to provide another outstanding  thread of pre-conference workshops pertinent to culturally responsive evaluation. Dr. Bowman will be a part of CREA’s team of presenters. Please take a look and we hope to see you there.

CREA Education Comes to Atlanta through Evaluation 2016

The Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) has partnered with the American Evaluation Association (AEA) to offer a unique thread of professional development training options as part of the pre- and post-conference professional development workshops during Evaluation 2016 in Atlanta, Georgia. CREA has created six workshop opportunities that focus on evaluation theory, methods, and practice grounded in culturally responsive evaluation.

CREA Professional Development Workshops

Contemporary Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Latino Communities
Tuesday, October 25, 2016 | 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Presenters: Leah Christina Neubauer and Lisa Aponte-Soto

This workshop will focus on contemporary culturally responsive evaluation (CRE) practice with Latino communities. Latinos are the fastest growing population in the United States, accounting for 16.3 percent of the total population (2010 census). CRE with multinational, racial, and ethnic Latino communities demands highly skilled evaluators who can employ evaluation approaches which align and support diverse perspectives in all evaluation phases. The session will begin with a brief history of social justice oriented evaluation theories, CRE, and Latino Critical Race Theory (LatCrit). This paradigmatic framing will provide a foundation to discuss the nine-step CRE process in action with Latino communities. Facilitators will highlight synthesized literature and draw on their own indigenous praxis-oriented perspectives. Participants should come prepared to ‘dig deep’ and share their experiences with Latino-focused evaluation planning and practice.

Foundations of Culturally Responsive Evaluation
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Rodney K. Hopson and Karen E. Kirkhart

This workshop addresses theoretical foundations of Culturally Responsive Evaluation (CRE) and the strategies that operationalize it in evaluation practice. Following opening introductions, presenters set the context with a brief history of how the evaluation profession is coming to a clearer appreciation of the centrality of culture. Against this backdrop, the history of CRE’s development is highlighted and key theoretical elements are identified. The workshop then transitions from theory to practice in three segments. The first segment pairs analysis of evaluation contexts with reflections on one’s own cultural location as an evaluator. This prepares participants to consider methods that are culturally congruent with their contexts of practice, noting potential strengths and limitations of each. CRE values the return of benefit to the community, and the third segment examines both methods and issues in communicating findings. Presenters pair examples from the literature with participants’ own examples to connect workshop content with participants’ contexts, interests, and concerns. The closing segment returns to Big Picture issues such as the fundamental grounding of CRE in social justice and how this poses important metaevaluation questions that connect to both ethics and validity.

Original Instructions: Utilizing Indigenous Knowledge, Frameworks, & Case Studies to Inform & Transform Evaluation Practice
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Fiona Cram and Nicole R. Bowman

This workshop focuses on the culturally responsive evaluation of services and programs provided for and/or designed by Indigenous peoples. The workshop is structured to answer three key questions in Indigenous Evaluation (IE): 1.) Who should undertake IE? 2.) What do evaluators need to understand about Indigenous contexts? How should IE be done?

Cultural Responsiveness and Mixed Methods Research
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
Presenters: Jori Hall

This engaging half-day workshop presents an introduction to mixed methods research, focusing on cultural responsiveness. Participants will explore key principles of cultural responsiveness and consider how these principles can be applied to mixed methods research. Topics covered related to mixed methods research include the benefits and challenges of mixed methods; when to use mixed methods; paradigmatic issues; research design conceptualization; and data integration. By attending the workshop, participants will be better able to apply cultural responsive understandings to the crafting of their own mixed methods project.

Culturally Relevant Evaluation and Research from a Quantitative Perspective
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Toks Fashola

This workshop will address culturally relevant and evaluative research from a quantitative perspective. The workshop seeks to engage the workshop participants in the process of creating a culturally relevant topic, and exploring quantitative ways to address this topic. The process will involve creating culturally relevant and quantitatively sound methods to create constructs, surveys, data dictionaries, and to administer enter, and interpret data. The outcome(s) will help to create and produce data that are not only rigorous and robust, but also data that can address topics of social justice, culturally relevant evaluation, and theories of change. The workshop will use some examples of projects that currently exist, and projects that are in progress. Workshop participants will be encouraged and guided to become informed consumers of quantitative research.

Utilization of a Racial Equity Lens to help Guide Strategic Engagement and Evaluation
Wednesday, October 26, 2016 | 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Presenters: Paul Elam, Willard Walker, and LaShaune Johnson

This workshop focuses on the practical use of a racial equity lens when conducting evaluation. The framework argues that culture and race are important considerations when conducting an evaluation because we believe that there are both critical and substantive nuances that are often missed, ignored, and/or misinterpreted when an evaluator is not aware of the culture of those being evaluated. Participants will be provided with a Template for Analyzing Programs through a Culturally Responsive and Racial Equity Lens, designed to focus deliberately on an evaluation process that takes race, culture, equity, and community context into consideration.

Register for Evaluation 2016 and learn more about the CREA workshops by visiting the Evaluation 2016 website.

See Dr. Bowman on the Eleanor Chelimsky Forum Tomorrow!

Dr. Bowman and Dr. Hood

Dr. Bowman and Dr. Hood

The Eleanor Chelimsky Forum

In its 4th year for the 2016 conference, the Chelimsky Forum on Evaluation Theory and Practice focuses on a conference theme through the eyes of selected luminaries from the evaluation field. Supported again by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, this spring’s Forum Plenary Presentation will feature Stafford Hood, Director of the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment. The role of Forum Discussant will be served by Nicole Bowman, President and founder of Bowman Performance Consulting.

When:  Monday, May 2nd 9:00 to 10:15 am

Where:  Salons A and B

Introduction:  Jill Feldman, Westat

Continuing the Exploration of U.S Evaluation History during the Pre-Brown v. Board of Education Era (1930-1954) and the Nobody Knows My Name Project: A Notable Footprint in the U.S. Office of Education

Featured Speaker:  Stafford Hood, Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment

This presentation builds upon previous work undertaken by Hood (1998, 2001; Hopson & Hood, 2005; Hood & Hopson, 2008, and Anderson-Frazier & Bertrand-Jones 2015) as part of the “Nobody Knows My Name” project. This project aimed to discover and acknowledge our roots in the evaluation field by illuminating the untold contributions of African American educational researchers and evaluators to evaluation research in the United States during the pre-Brown era. This presentation provides an opportunity to reflect on Eleanor Chelimsky’s significant contributions to evaluation theory and practice within the context of the federal government while similarly considering the contributions of Ambrose Caliver, who in 1930 was appointed the Specialist in the Education of Negroes in the U.S. Office of Education’s Division of Special Problems. Caliver became a significant figure, contributing to efforts to meld culturally-informed theory and practice in responding to the educational inequities facing African Americans of the day.

Discussant:  Nicole Bowman, Bowman Performance Consulting

*This session will be videotaped.

 

Don’t Miss Dr. Bowman on CREA’s 2016 Panel Presentation Tomorrow!

crealogoCREA 2016 Panel Presentation, Being Culturally Responsive: Discerning When, Where, and How Cultural Familiarity Counts. Melvin Hall (Northern Arizona University), chair. Nicole R. Bowman (Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC), Wanda Casillas (Deloitte Consulting), Fiona Cram (Centre for Social Impact, New Zealand), Rodney Hopson (George Mason University), & Hazel Symonette (University of Wisconsin-Madison), presenters.

April 22, 2016 | 10:45am – 12:15pm | Room: Salon 2
Conference program

From the paper abstract: “As part of the last CREA Conference, a panel of culturally responsive evaluators explored the personal traits and experiences that helped to shape their worldview and dispositions toward evaluation. As a follow up to that session, an expanded panel will again explore interactions between the personal, professional, and community commitments that influence how an evaluator does their work. We begin the discussion with examining the dynamics when an evaluator works in a community they know well, and then extend the analysis to the situation where they work in similar but distant communities. When working in your community of origin, in what understandings can you place confidence during an attempt to be culturally responsive? How far from a familiar home base, can or should the evaluator feel confident of their ability to be responsive? When preparing to enter a familiar but distant space, what cautions might we suggest?”

Join Us! April 22nd Paper Panel with Bowman and Chamberlain

CREA 2016 Paper Panel, Perspectives in Evaluation Training, Thinking and Practice. Nicole R. Bowman (Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC) & Anne Chamberlain (IMPAQ International LLC), presenters.

April 22, 2016 | 9:00 am – 10:30 am | Room: Marshfield
Conference program

From the paper abstract: “Through an United States Department of Agriculture funded and congressionally mandated study that includes the 567 tribal governments and Alaskan Native villages in the United States, session participants will learn how the principals of Tribally Driven Participatory Research (TDPR) can be utilized in research and evaluation studies. The emphasis of this session will be not only on understanding the conceptual and theoretical foundations to TDPR but also the practical implementation of TDPR as an effective model for creating highly effective and culturally responsive Tribal/academic research partnerships. Participants will be engaged through active discussion, will learn about the strengths and challenges of this model, and will be given many resources to help inform their future practice.”

Tomorrow! Dr. Bowman with Dr. Beverly Anderson Parsons (InSites) “Addressing Structural Racism through Systems-Oriented Evaluation”

Dr. Parsons

Dr. Parsons

CREA 2016 Symposium Session, Addressing Structural Racism through Systems-Oriented Evaluation, Patricia Jessup (Jessup & Associates), chair. What Evaluators Need to Know About Structural Racism, Nicole R. Bowman (Bowman Performance Consulting, LLC) & Beverly Anderson Parsons (InSites), presenters.

April 21, 2016 | 10:00 am – 11:30 am | Room: Chicago

Conference program

From the symposium abstract: “The session includes a description of four evaluation designs that are being incorporated into the evaluation guidebook. The designs highlight critical points in the complex and often unpredictable processes of changing the basic paradigms on which our social systems are built in regard to race. The designs are grounded within communities but reach inward and outward from that pivotal point with attention to honoring all voices. Investment design, implementation, and evaluation all work together to increase racial equity that generates significant practical returns in the form of improved social and economic outcomes for vulnerable populations.”

2016 Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) International Conference

April 20-22, 2016 | Chicago, IL

Conference website

Conference schedule

From the website: CREA 3rd International Conference The Next Generation of Theory and Practice: Rethinking Equity through Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment will demonstrate the kinds of interventions in education, health care, criminal justice, and social services that are being undertaken to address inequities. What has been attempted? What are the results? What works for whom, why, and in what circumstances? This year’s theme includes, broadening participation in STEM and beyond; capacity building in global and local communities and neighborhoods; development of equitable measures, methods and metrics; policies and practices of influence and consequence; and examples of effective models of collaborations and networks.”