HEB Theme Issue on Equity and Justice

Please consider submitting an abstract to develop a manuscript for the special theme issue on Collaboration for Equity and Justice. I am working with several noted scholar/practitioners on a special issue of Health Education and Behavior. This is based on the publication effort led by Tom Wolff and a team of nearly 20 leaders to frame the values and approaches to Collaboration for Equity and Justice that promotes a values-based approach to the work. We are looking for examples, case studies, data-based investigations and other manuscripts that will expand our understanding of approaches that contribute most to community engagement and transformation in this area.

This effort is being supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Health Equity Team, along with leadership in the Society for Public Health Education. Our colleagues at RWJF are keen to support, and to learn more about, efforts to promote health equity among marginalized populations. Papers submitted for publication may significantly inform their investments and efforts to support communities more broadly. The call for papers can be downloaded at https://communityleadershipsquared.box.com/s/wbn39kzprhraz6k2cbsaa3rmkj8gchk2.

Although the original deadline for abstracts was Dec 15, we are extending this to January 1, in the hopes of getting as many manuscripts as possible. We especially hope to get more manuscript proposals that include evidence of success, along with theoretical and conceptual analyses of those efforts.

HEB is considered to be one of the pre-eminent journals in public health, and the flagship journal of the Society for Public Health Education. Please email me with questions and ideas, or contact Dr Michelle Kegler directly. Please send abstracts to Dr Kegler, following the instructions on the attached call for papers.

Please share this call for papers with others who may be interested in submitting an abstract and manuscript.

Q & A Session with Honoring Nations

Are you thinking of applying to the 2018 Honoring Nations award in good governance?  Do you have questions about eligibility, the application process, or the criteria?  If so, please join us for a Q & A session and let us answer your questions! Participation is not mandatory; however applicants are encouraged to participate.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 at 4pm EST
The toll-free call in number: 1-866-889-3913
The Conference Passcode: HN18

The Harvard Project’s Honoring Nations program invites applications from American Indian governments across a broad range of subject areas including:

  • Cultural Affairs
  • Economic and Community Development
  • Education
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Government Performance
  • Health and Social Services
  • Intergovernmental Relations
  • Justice

The 2018 Honoring Nations awardees will receive a monetary grant to share their stories of success: $2000 for honors and $5000 for high honors.  Awardees will also be featured in case profiles, nation-building curriculum, Google platforms, and through world-class exhibits showcased at the Smithsonian Institution.

At the heart of Honoring Nations is the principle that tribes themselves hold the key to positive social, political, cultural, and economic prosperity—and that self-governance plays a crucial role in building and sustaining strong, healthy Indian nations.  Honored programs give decision-makers fresh ideas about how to create sustainable economies, improve service delivery, protect and manage vital resources, administer justice, and educate tribal citizens.

Applications are due January 24, 2018 For additional information about this program, please contact:

SIGN UP

MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference: RFP!

Rita S. Fierro, PhD from Fierro Consulting has agreed to give the Keynote Address at the MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference on May 10, 2018. The conference theme is Enhancing Evaluation Through Effective Communication and Interaction. The conference is accepting proposals for presentations and posters at this time. Go to maeeval.org for more information about Dr. Fierro’s keynote and links to the application forms.

*The deadline for proposals is Monday, January 22, 2018.

Indigenous Professors Seeking Contributors

Robert Lee and Alan Velie are editing a series of volumes on the Native American Renaissance. The first, on literature,  has been published by University of Oklahoma Press. They are in the process of gathering articles for the second, on art, politics, religion, and economic development. They have most of the art pieces in hand; but are looking for contributors on politics, economics, and religion. If you are interested, please respond to Bob Lee at arobertlee@gol.comor Alan Velie at alanvelie@ou.edu.

Call for Submissions: Decolonize This

Call for submissions due October 30!

In nearly a year of a Trump presidency, the visibility of White supremacists has risen. Corporate and government partnership has brought back the Dakota Access and Keystone oil pipelines even amid the visceral impacts of climate change in this year’s devastating hurricanes and wildfires. Yet, the destructive course we’re on isn’t surprising given North America’s colonial history, where wealth was built on cultural oppression, land dispossession, and the exploitation of both people and land. What disruptive forces are destructive enough andcreative enough to transcend this legacy?

Decolonization is needed. We heard it loudly at Standing Rock. We hear it every day from oppressed people. But what does that look like? Is it all or nothing? Does the idea of it differ by generation? How much is really possible? And who benefits—how might breaking free from systems of White supremacy be liberating for everyone?

To answer these questions, YES! will turn to Indian Country. We’re looking for powerful ideas and evidence of solutions and profound change headed our way—and we’re looking for Native writers to tell these stories.

Subject areas might include:

  • The future of the White male-centered dominant culture. The aging of the general population, the unique disruptive force that millennials present. The increasingly multi-ethnic population.
  • The human relationship to the ecosystem.
  • The changing nature of dissent as Indigenous movements become global and social media allows people to find their community despite where they live.
  • Land reform and reconnection to land and water. Rights versus responsibilities to the natural world.
  • Language and cultural revitalization. How are Indigenous cultures experiencing renewal in the modern world? How do we combat cultural and political amnesia? How do we differentiate among appropriation, appreciation, and sharing?
  • What of truth, reconciliation, and governmental apologies? What might be an Indigenous approach to healing centered on responsibilities, resurgence, and relationships?
  • What kind of economic development can connect Indigenous homelands, cultures, and communities?
  • Solidarity and allies. What have we learned in the year after Standing Rock, when Native communities here joined the global Indigenous movement in challenging corporate-government systems that destroy sacred land and water for profit? How was Standing Rock a movement for decolonization?
  • What might a just nation-to-nation relationship among Indigenous nations and settlers look like?

Are you an Indigenous writer or photographer who has an idea for a reported feature, deeply researched think piece, or personal essay that belongs in this issue of YES! Magazine? Send pitches and leads to decolonize@yesmagazine.org.

19th Annual AISA Conference – Feb 1 & 2

Announcing the 19thAnnual American Indian Studies Association Conference,  “Unsettling American History:  American Indian Studies in the time of the Trump Administration, White Supremacy, and Settler Nationalism” to be held on February 1 & 2, 2018 at Arizona State University, Tempe Campus.

The organizers of the AISA Conference welcome proposals for paper and panel presentations, posters, roundtables, film screenings, and workshops. Consideration will be given to other topics that relate to American Indian issues. Proposals from faculty; students at colleges, universities, and tribal colleges; community-based scholars, elders, and professionals working in the field are encouraged and welcomed.

The following topics are welcomed:

  • Decolonizing Public Space: Removing Settler Colonial Historical Presence
  • “Taking Sides” in Re-Presentations of US History
  • Healing through Resistance
  • Indigenous Lives Matter: American Indians in the Age of Trump
  • Re-Imagining the Indigenous Landscape: Trump Era Environmentalism
  • Struggle to Preserve Natural/Cultural Resources
  • Culturally Appropriate and Historically Accurate Memorials
  • Changing or revisioning monuments, names of people and places, boarding schoo

    s, and universities (Amherst College) that continue to glorify of the genocide of Indigenous Peoples.

Please see the PDF document for more information about the conference, and how to submit proposals. If you have any questions, please contact Michael Yellow Bird atMichael.Yellowbird@ndsu.edu or Aaron Woods at awoods@asu.edu .

Call for Articles – Indigenous Knowledge

IK: Other Ways of Knowing, a publication of Penn State Libraries Open Publishing, is currently seeking original research articles, book and new resource reviews, and field reports relating to indigenous knowledge for inclusion in upcoming issues. The journal particularly welcomes works with audio and visual components.

About the Journal

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, open access journal concentrating on indigenous knowledge and its application to solve complex problems in areas such as health, agriculture, education, law, and the environment. The journal also fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the different indigenous perspectives regarding the human identity and its place in societies across the world.

Indigenous knowledge focuses on ways of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down informally from generation to generation. The journal has a global scope and is interested in the research and application of indigenous knowledge in both “developing” and “developed” regions of the world. New issues of the journal are published twice per year, in June and December.

To Submit a Manuscript

Review the journal’s author guidelines to register with the journal and begin a submission. Please contact Mark Mattson, Managing Editor (mam1196@psu.edu)with any additional questions.

Submit your Proposal for Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL)

Full Proposal Deadline Date

November 6, 2017

SYNOPSIS

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

CONTACTS

Name Email Phone Room
Address Questions to the  Program DRLAISL@nsf.gov (703)292-8616
For administrative questions contact the Program by e-mail at DRLAISL@nsf.gov or phone at (703)292-8616

Announcement of an Effort to Expand the NSF INCLUDES National Network

National Science Founation welcomes three types of proposals:

EAGER Proposals should produce findings and results that will generate new insights for the NSF INCLUDES National Network, suggest potential strategies for engaging NSF’s existing broadening participation activities in the Network and/or highlight lessons learned that could inform the NSF INCLUDES Launch Pilots and Alliances as they develop. EAGERs are encouraged that:

  1. Conduct research on the implementation and impact of strategies to improve specific problems of diversity and inclusion in STEM, especially strategies focused on expanding networks and scaling effective innovations. Studies should be grounded in the relevant social science, behavioral science, economic, or education research theories or frameworks, apply appropriate methods, and further the evidence-based research (e.g., the science of broadening participation) that illustrates the efficacy of the various approaches, especially collective impact-style approaches; or
  2. Examine strategies being used in projects in the existing NSF broadening participation portfolio. For example, research could examine the implementation, impact, network expansion, and scaling of change strategies used in NSF-funded projects within the NSF INCLUDES portfolio of Design and Development Launch Pilots, or projects funded through such programs as ADVANCE, the Broadening Participation in Computing Alliances, the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation(LSAMP), Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), and Math and Science Partnership, or the outreach activities of NSF research centers and large facilities aimed at broadening participation. Research could explore how strategies such as collective impact or networked improvement communities are being used to address the challenge of broadening participation in STEM.

Conference proposals to:

  1. Link to the NSF INCLUDES National Network the knowledge and results from the NSF broadening participation portfolio of programs and projects, and from NSF center-scale activities (e.g., Science and Technology Centers and Engineering Research Centers, among others), or other major Foundation investments, and encourage new opportunities for collaboration across the network;
  2. Generate novel ideas for how new and existing collaborations and organizations can help shape opportunities for connecting to the NSF INCLUDES National Network;
  3. Communicate research findings from the science of broadening participation research community to the NSF INCLUDES National Network, especially as these pertain to new efforts to translate basic research into practice; or
  4. Provide a platform for new collaborations within the NSF INCLUDES National Network to discuss the development of shared goals, common metrics, and mutually reinforcing activities.

Supplemental funding requests to:

  1. Create opportunities among currently-funded NSF projects, including NSF broadening participation projects, with the goal to build a collaborative infrastructure for broadening participation in NSF-funded research activities;
  2. Provide seed money for experiments in using effective strategies to further broadening participation goals through collaborative change;
  3. Develop linkages between current activities and NSF INCLUDES-funded Design and Development Launch Pilots, including adoption of common goals, shared measures, and mutually reinforcing activities; or
  4. Generate new ideas for bringing a community of NSF-funded projects into the NSF INCLUDES National Network.

Submission Deadlines and Special Instructions

There are two submission deadlines for funding requests in response to this Dear Colleague Letter. Before submitting EAGER or Conference proposals, eligible Principal Investigator(s) should email nsfincludes@nsf.gov with a one-page description of their project to determine suitability for this NSF INCLUDES Dear Colleague Letter and the appropriate deadline for the proposals. Any of the types of requests encouraged in this Dear Colleague Letter can be submitted to either deadline.

  • November 13, 2017
  • April 16, 2018

Funding requests for EAGERs and Conferences should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG): https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg. EAGERs may request up to $300,000 for two years. Conference proposals may be up to $250,000 for up to two years. EAGERs and Conference proposals should be submitted to NSF INCLUDES in the Human Resource Development (HRD) division.

Supplements from PIs of existing grants, other than current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, in any directorate are welcome. Eligible supplements must have the potential to enhance both the Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts of the existing project. Projects must have an end date beyond September 30, 2018. Eligible Principal Investigator(s) contact their cognizant Program Director(s) and an NSF INCLUDES team member to discuss their request for supplemental support prior to submitting to NSF. The amount requested for supplemental support must be less than 20% of the original award amount, with direct costs not to exceed $200,000. Funding is dependent on the availability of funds. Supplemental funding requests should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF PAPPG, Part II: Award and Administration Guide, Chapter I.E.4: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg.

More information available here: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17111/nsf17111.jsp

2018 Ford Foundation Fellowship Programs

Competition Deadlines:

2018 Predoctoral application deadline is: December 14, 2017 (5:00 PM EST)

2018 Dissertation and Postdoctoral application deadlines are: December 7, 2017 (5:00 PM EST)

Supplementary Materials receipt deadline for submitted applications is: January 9, 2018 (5:00 PM EST)

Through its Fellowship Programs, the Ford Foundation seeks to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

Predoctoral, Dissertation, and Postdoctoral fellowships will be awarded in a national competition administered by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on behalf of the Ford Foundation.

Eligibility to apply for a Ford fellowship is limited to:

  • All U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, and U.S. permanent residents (holders of a Permanent Resident Card), as well as individuals granted deferred action status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, regardless of race, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, or sexual orientation,
  • Individuals with evidence of superior academic achievement (such as grade point average, class rank, honors or other designations), and
  • Individuals committed to a career in teaching and research at the college or university level.