The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated and More Insights from Community Science

*View the Community Science Newsletter online.

September 2017

The Tragedy of Professionalizing Social Change: We Are the System We Seek to Change
By: David Chavis, PhD, President/CEO
There is little doubt that this country and this world are seeing monumental challenges that we have not seen in decades, if ever. Racism and other forms of hate have become legitimized in many more places than we have seen in a while. There is a rise of authoritarian rule, “bullyism,” and violence against women and minorities. In this country, the basic social contract of a caring state and a common community (e pluribus unum – or “out of many, one”) is being threatened on nearly an hourly basis. The good news is that there has been a large-scale outcry from all corners of our society over many of the abuses and abusiveness. People are organizing across race and class to try to turn these trends around, and to promote equality and inclusion in this great country…
Early this year, our friend and colleague Rodney Hopson came to speak to our staff on culturally competent evaluation, as part of our internal professional development series. Rodney ended his workshop by reading a poem based on the lyrics to a song by the great jazz artist Gil Scot-Heron entitled The Revolution Will Not Be Televised as part of a 2011 tribute to evaluation thought leader Michael Scriven. We have dedicated this issue of The Change Agent to Rodney’s message. That message is a wake-up call to all of us “professionals” that if we want to see change, it is not going to come in a contract, grant, or billable hour. It’s going to come only by rejoining the social justice movement, not as an expert, but as a participant.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated
An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation
By: Rodney Hopson
Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development

George Mason University

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.”

Staff Profile: Maria Fernanda Mata

Maria Fernanda Mata, MA Analyst, has experi-ence in social science research, program development, public policy, and advocacy, particularly in the areas of community engagement, access to healthcare and social support, immigration, and social mobility. She is particularly interested in the application of quantitative and qualitative research to improve programs and services that empower racially and ethnically diverse communities. At Community Science, Maria is working to develop a tool kit that community- and faith-based organizations can use to reach and increase healthcare access for the most vulnerable populations. As part of this project, she is helping to identify strategies to educate communities of color and individuals with limited English proficiency, low literacy, or low health insurance literacy about the importance of obtaining health insurance coverage and the benefits of accessing preventive healthcare. Prior to joining Community Science, Maria Fernanda served as programs research associate for the National Hispanic Council on Aging, where she led program and policy research on key issues impacting Hispanic communities, including health, retirement security, and access to social programs.

Read more

Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.

 

View entire report online (PDF)

Call for Articles/Indigenous Knowledge: Other Ways of Knowing Open Access Journal

Call for Articles – Indigenous Knowledge

IK: Other Ways of Knowing<https://journals.psu.edu/ik/index>, a publication of Penn State Libraries Open Publishing, is currently seeking original research articles, book and new resource reviews, and field reports relating to indigenous knowledge for inclusion in upcoming issues. The journal particularly welcomes works with audio and visual components.

About the Journal

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, open access journal concentrating on indigenous knowledge and its application to solve complex problems in areas such as health, agriculture, education, law, and the environment. The journal also fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the different indigenous perspectives regarding the human identity and its place in societies across the world.

Indigenous knowledge focuses on ways of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down informally from generation to generation. The journal has a global scope and is interested in the research and application of indigenous knowledge in both “developing” and “developed” regions of the world. New issues of the journal are published twice per year, in June and December.

To Submit a Manuscript

Review the journal’s author guidelines<https://journals.psu.edu/ik/about/submissions#authorGuidelines> to register with the journal and begin a submission. Please contact Mark Mattson, Managing Editor (mam1196@psu.edu)<mailto:mam1196@psu.edu%29> with any additional questions.

Article: Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion

Congrats to Martin Reinhardt on publishing “Curriculum development, lesson planning, and delivery: A guide to Native language immersion!”

Abstract: In 2016, Dr. Martin Reinhardt and Dr. Jioanna Carjuzaa produced a series of three webinars concerning Indigenous language immersion programs. The first webinar focused on broad curriculum development ideas including core relationships, guidelines and principles for effective pedagogy, and models. The second webinar focused on the elements of lesson planning. The third and last webinar focused on assessments and the use of rubrics aligned with Indigenous language standards. The content of the webinars has been transposed into the following chapter with certain modifications.

Subjects: Education; Education Studies; Multicultural Education; Curriculum Studies

Read the full article online!

Call for Articles – Indigenous Knowledge

IK: Other Ways of Knowing, a publication of Penn State Libraries Open Publishing, is currently seeking original research articles, book and new resource reviews, and field reports relating to indigenous knowledge for inclusion in upcoming issues. The journal particularly welcomes works with audio and visual components.

About the Journal

IK: Other Ways of Knowing is an online, multidisciplinary, peer-reviewed, open access journal concentrating on indigenous knowledge and its application to solve complex problems in areas such as health, agriculture, education, law, and the environment. The journal also fosters a better understanding and appreciation of the different indigenous perspectives regarding the human identity and its place in societies across the world.

Indigenous knowledge focuses on ways of knowing, seeing, and thinking that are passed down informally from generation to generation. The journal has a global scope and is interested in the research and application of indigenous knowledge in both “developing” and “developed” regions of the world. New issues of the journal are published twice per year, in June and December.

To Submit a Manuscript

Review the journal’s author guidelines to register with the journal and begin a submission. Please contact Mark Mattson, Managing Editor (mam1196@psu.edu)with any additional questions.

NCAI President Brian Cladoosby: Meeting Hate with a Call to Action

Bowman Performance Consulting supports a peaceful, inclusive, empowered, and diverse existence on Mother Earth. Enjoy this call to action by NCAI President Brian Cladoosby: Meeting Hate with a Call to Action.

 

August 24, 2017

 

We are now 12 days removed from the appalling and tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia, and I am still struggling to process what transpired there and what it means for me as a Native person, an American, and a national leader representing a community of color in one of the most diverse countries on earth. I, too, am still coming to grips with the distressing response of our nation’s highest public official and others in government and the media, who morally equate the hatred and aggression of those bent on dividing our country with those who choose to stand against them in order to protect the core values of love, tolerance, community, and mutual respect by which most Americans live their lives.

Recent events in Charlottesville and elsewhere remind us of just how fragile the fabric that holds this country together has become. The political rhetoric that has come to infest our public discourse in recent years has emboldened the forces of racism and division to crawl from beneath the rocks under which they have long hid to proudly reassert their bigoted view of the world, their fellow man, what it means to be an American, and what makes this country great.

This groundswell of bigotry that all Americans observe daily on their TVs and smart phones – and that people of color personally experience – takes many forms. Intolerant attitudes. Hurtful words. And, increasingly, devastating violence. I think about the crime of hate perpetrated against Heather Heyer, who lost her life when she was crushed by a vehicle driven by a white supremacist in the hometown of Thomas Jefferson. I also think about the crime of hate perpetrated against Quinault Indian Nation member Jimmy Smith-Kramer, an innocent young father of two who recently lost his life in Washington state in the same fashion at the hands of a driver who reportedly screamed racial slurs and war whoops during the attack.

Jimmy Smith-Kramer’s story reminds us all that crimes of hate against people of color simply because they are people of color is not, nor ever has been, simply a “whites versus blacks” issue. Every one of the tribal nations across this country can lay painful claim to tribal histories strewn with various incidents of hate crimes against their ancestors for no other reason than they were Indigenous to the land, different than, or just in the way. And virtually every citizen of those nations today can lay claim to a family member or friend who has personally been the victim of race-based violence.

That, ultimately, is what the battle over the monuments of hate like the one in Charlottesville is all about – making this deplorable treatment of all peoples of color a thing of the past, once and for all. It’s about what we value as a nation, today, and what values will guide us in creating an America rooted first and foremost in equality. An America where your lot in life and how you are viewed and treated by your fellow Americans are not determined by the color of your skin, your faith, your dress, or your sexual orientation.

Having served as Chairman of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community for three decades and President of the National Congress of American Indians for the past four years has taught me that creating this America depends on one thing and one thing only: respect. Respect for one another, our differences, and the invaluable contributions we all make as Americans – including the First Americans, the tribal nations to which we belong, and the tribal governments that daily serve and strengthen tribal and surrounding communities.

But respect is not happenstance. It cannot be left to fate or wishful thinking. It is borne only of a genuine commitment and sustained action to learn from one another, to learn about and understand one another – especially those who may look, worship, and love different than you.

The long, unending process of building that respect must take place in our schools, where the complex history of America – and the histories of all of those peoples who compose it – must be taught in an inclusive, culturally appropriate, and factually accurate fashion. The teaching of that complex history, for one, must convey the fact that America, despite its long-held fables, was not “discovered” by white men. It was built around hundreds upon hundreds of long thriving tribal societies that continue to exercise their inherent rights as sovereign governments today, persevering in the face of centuries of mistreatment, marginalization, and genocide.

Building that respect also takes place at our family dinner tables, at our workplaces, on our streets, in our grocery store check-out lines, and on social media. Every such interaction is an opportunity to teach and to learn, to choose unity and tolerance over division and intolerance. And we must seize on every such opportunity.

Building that respect also takes place in the halls of Congress, the offices of the White House, the chambers of state legislatures, and the meeting rooms of county and municipal governments. We call on all elected officials at the federal, state, and local levels: back up your encouraging rhetoric with bold, forward-thinking laws and policies designed to hold the forces of racism and division fully accountable for their crimes against humanity and community. Send an unequivocal message that their values are not this country’s values. And fervently and consistently enforce those laws and policies without exception.

In sum, building that respect demands the active involvement of each and every one of us. We all have an obligation to act in every facet of our personal and professional lives to build our understanding of and respect for all of our fellow Americans, and to call out and condemn those – even friends, family members, and close colleagues – who out of ignorance, fear, or self-interest have chosen that other, darker path. If the last two weeks have taught us anything, it is that indifference and inaction serve as a breeding ground for the divisions we see ripping at the fabric of this great country. We should never forget the past, for it informs who we are and should be today. But we must own the future that we seek to create for our children, our grandchildren, our American brothers and sisters, and our generations yet to come by starting today. We each must do our part to heal our nation so that we can move forward as a nation. We have no more time to waste. There are no excuses for further indecision. The time to act is now.

Outreach Grant for Native American and Indigenous Presenters

The Association for the Study of Women and Mythology posted the following.

We are pleased to announce that ASWM has received a special outreach grant for our 2018 conference. This will fund participation by Native American and indigenous scholars and researchers. Proposals will be read by an outside panel of scholars, and applicants may be asked to provide certification of their tribal membership. ASWM will consider successful grant projects and articles for inclusion in our forthcoming Proceedings series.

Our external grants committee invites Native American and indigenous scholars, researchers, artists, and activists to submit critical, creative, and practitioner proposals on topics that address the identity and empowerment of Native American and indigenous women, girls, families, and the environment through women-centered mythologies, earth centered mythologies, story-telling, healing practices, inter-generational exchanges, and traditional knowledge and practices.  We encourage work whose objective is to empower both women and the earth to alleviate violence and suffering in both women and the environment. We invite proposals that demonstrate the application of traditional knowledge and wisdom practices in rectifying social justice issues pertaining to women and the environment.

ASWM 2018 External Grant Call for Proposals

ASWM External Grants Proposal Submission form

Understanding American Indian and Alaska Native Early Childhood Needs

Understanding American Indian and Alaska Native Early Childhood Needs: The Potential of Existing Data

This report describes preliminary work in support of an early childhood needs assessment for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children prenatal to age five. The report uses existing data to describe the population of AI/AN children and families and their participation in early childhood services.

*Listen to and Download PDF of report here

Dr. Bowman Contributes to AEA Feminist Issues in Evaluation Newsletter

As we focus on intersectionality, we reached out to members of other TIGs to solicit their perspectives on and experiences with intersectionality. Three colleagues from different sectors and life experiences discuss how they address issues of diversity, equity, and justice in their evaluation work.
Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape), PhD is President of Bowman Performance Consulting and an evaluator/ researcher with the University of WI-Madison. She currently chairs the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG and is a member of the Independent Consulting TIG and Multi-ethnic Evaluation TIG.

In your own words, how would you describe intersectionality?
Intersectionality feels like linear lines but when I practice it, it is round and relational. I enjoy seeing where things “connect” and “are related” (like our Indigenous traditional teachings). So I conceptualize and practice intersectionality as paths crossing on our journey and hopefully paths that continue to circle around and back as I learn and grow from and with others.

Describe your feelings about intersectionality (particularly with gender/feminism) and its impact in/on your work?
Connecting and relations (AKA intersectionality) are central to my life (academic, professional, and personal). And these are not just thoughts but concrete activities and community-based or Indigenous concepts/frameworks that make my work with intersectionality multi-dimensional. They span the realms of physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional as I carry my work out with and in service to others/community. Gender and feminism are only things I have to think about when the western world impacts my life/work. Traditionally speaking there is balance and male/female (and all things) to keep life running smoothly (and work). Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do and gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that feminism also can be inclusive like evaluation should be with different notions of two spirit people.

How can work on intersectionality impact or propel learning to action (this year’s AEA theme)?
Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do within evaluation. Making feminism, gender, or sexuality primarily defined, represented by, and framed via a heterosexual lens is not sufficient and also is excluding a large percent of the population. Feminism, gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that evaluators and the field of evaluation is equipped with the skills, knowledge, and abilities to effectively work with, for, and value our two spirit brothers and sisters.

*Read more here: http://mailchi.mp/7628c56bc902/aea-feminist-issues-in-evaluation-newsletter-july-2017?e=e25a028289

Evaluation and the Framing of Race

Evaluation and the Framing of Race by

First Published March 15, 2017; pp. 167–189

Racial framing can have strong effects on programs, policies, and even evaluations. Racial framing developed as a justification for the exploitation of minorities and has been a primary causal factor in the persistence of racism. By being aware of its pattern, structure, origins, and how racial framing generates effects, we can significantly reduce its influence, thus enhancing the rigor of our studies by controlling for a potential bias that’s often covert. Stories play a critical role in framing and reframing processes. They constitute a key part of the vocabulary of action.

*Read here