Help support diverse media voices!

The bidding has begun for Tribal College Journal’s annual online charity auction! Bidding ends on Monday, December 4 at 9 p.m..
Items up for auction include a tipi, jewelry, books, a star quilt, a Pendleton blanket, artwork, photography, vacation stays, and more!
All proceeds benefit Tribal College Journal’s work to share news and information about tribal higher education and opportunity in Indian Country.
Questions?

Graphic Facilitation Training for Evaluators!

 

A one-day, hands-on introduction to visual thinking
and graphic facilitation.

The power to clarify thinking, create shared understanding and to make positive change is at your fingertips. All you need is paper and pen.

In this interactive and engaging full-day workshop, Brandy Agerbeck shares her solid gold lessons from over 20 years’ experience as a graphic facilitator creating live, large-scale drawings for her clients. She’ll give you concrete, accessible tips on HOW to reclaim drawing as your best thinking tool and important reasons WHY visuals are vital to helping groups understanding and improve their work.

Learning Objectives:
  • Learn the basic principles of graphic facilitation, practice it, and understand some of the business basics (e.g., hiring a graphic facilitator, consulting as a graphic facilitator)
  • Bring together a diverse group of evaluators, artists, and communication design students for peer mentorship
Why Graphic Facilitation?

In 2016, ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Inc. identified one of the leaders in graphic facilitation, Brandy Agerbeck, was right next door in Chicago! We’ve been working ever since to bring her to Wisconsin. In partnership with the Milwaukee Art Institute and Design (MIAD), we are excited to bring you this training. 3 out of 4 learners are visual thinkers. Millennials are taking the reigns – leading in all sectors from government to nonprofit. They use visual tools and social media more than their predecessors. To facilitate evaluation use, we need to do things differently – like getting data out there that speaks to visual decision-makers. We also see the void of this skill in the Milwaukee area (and likely the state). This event is the first step in getting more graphic facilitators working in our community providing this service – and it’s starting with the ¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Inc. community.

We also want to make connections to the graphic illustrators and artists so we invited MIAD to join us. At the training there will be lots of opportunity to work with artists, artist communities of practice from around the state, and artists of color. Thank you Dale Schilder, Chair of Graphic Illustration for joining us on this journey!

You can Draw
Can evaluators draw a square box? YES!!!! We asked Brandy if evaluators could really do her training. She said yes, we know the content which makes us the best type of training participant. The drawing part is easy, distilling the content to obtain an accurate record of the meeting is A LOT harder!
Don’t live in Milwaukee? Come anyway!
We are sharing the dates early so that we can have as many non-Milwaukee evaluators and artists participate as possible. Space is limited and we are inviting artists from many communities to join us so book today!
Get Your Name Out There
This training is worth hundreds of dollars. Brandy usually charges over $1K for a single participant. To cover the cost of our training ($60 for members), we would like to offer $25 advertisements (logos only) to be included in the training manual insert. The advertisement guidelines can be found here.

 

¡Milwaukee Evaluation! Members: $60
Non-members: $60 until Dec. 15th, then $100 (hurry and register soon!)

MIAD Students: To register, contact Dale Schilder

Light refreshments, lunch and art supplies included

Friday, January 26, 2018
9:00 am to 4:00 pmMilwaukee Institute for Art and Design
273 E. Erie St., Milwaukee, WI 53202

Parking
Italian Community Center – $5

Pre-Order Books – special discounts for our training participants! Pre-order Brandy’s books by December 31st at a 20% discount at: www.loosetooth.com/events/mke

 

Gil Scott-Heron – The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

*The following was posted on Community Science.

The Revolution Will Not Be Evaluated

An ode to Gil Scot-Heron, Michael Scriven, and the future of evaluation1

By: Rodney Hopson

Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Education and Human Development
George Mason University1

“You will not be able to avoid the usefulness and ubiquity of evaluation,
You will not be able to mislabel, misappropriate, misconceive, misapply, or misuse
evaluation, limiting it to the settings of programs, policies, and personnel
You will not be able to refer to the usual distinctions between research and
evaluation, draw simple conclusions at the end of a program evaluation, or avoid
instances of bias and conflicts of interests, as if our only concern in the discipline
rests on value judgments or our only claim to fame is to inform decision-making
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the Beltway Bandits co-opted and
aligned through financial loyalties and veiled allegiances of quid pro quo,
The revolution will not continue to pay honor and homage to the roots of the field in
recognition of the Ralph Tylers and other forefathers without attention to the
foremothers or even specifically to those African American evaluators who either
studied with them but nobody cared or knew their name.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

The revolution will not be brought to you by the American Evaluation Association or
Sage and will not star Marcia Guttentag, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva and Gunner Myrdal, or
Robert Ingle award winners.
The revolution will not give you continuing education credits at professional
development workshops,
The revolution will not decide the qualitative-quantitative debate,
The revolution will not get you published, promoted, tenure, or funded;
The revolution will not use evidence-based, performance-measured, scientifically-                                        legitimate arguments assumptions, and logics,
Because the revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no pretty little pictures of logic models, theories of action, theories of
change, or whatever you want to call or confuse these graphic conceptual models –
used and abused without careful and critical thinking about their use at various
stages and development in serious, systematic evaluations;
Funders and clients will not require that we focus only on goals and objectives – in
fact, we will do our damnest to stay away from them and those who run these
programs since their story is not likely the one that has most merit.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no references to the Arab Spring, looters in the UK, nor in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina;
There will be no democracy or equality without evaluation and no evaluation
without attention to democracy or equality;
There will be no high stakes evaluations who continue to show how traditionally
poor, underserved, and minoritized communities and students do in schools or on
tests that are not meant for them or do not have their best interests without
metaevaluations (done by evaluees!) or using judicial/adversarial models without a
real attention to the consequences of evaluation bias.
There will be no “racialist or paternalistic traditions of social scientific work
reproducing dominance and subordination in the academy and in the worlds we
study and evaluate2” as if we are clueless and unfettered by the Murdochs, debt
ceilings, and wasteful military industrial and prison complex spending and
shenanigans in religion of national security and war on terrorism.
NRC, STEM, and MRDC will no longer be relevant and standards, principles, criteria,
and checklists will no longer be restrictive and fundamentalist unless they lead to
creative, meaningful evaluation practice which generates new knowledges,
epistemologies, and methodologies.
The revolution will not be evaluated.

There will be no academic programs in the social or natural sciences, law,
humanities without evaluation – interdisciplinarily or intradisciplinarily;
There will be no static or finite presentations, textbooks, or articles about evaluation
models, and approaches written by the usual suspects at this symposium
The revolution will not be evaluated.
The revolution will not be defined only by mandates 40 years ago from Great Society
legislation;
You will not have to worry about whether what we do is scientific, whether it
informs accountability or whether it is useful, feasible, proper, or accurate;
The revolution will not go better with desired outputs or outcomes;
The revolution will be on Facebook, Twitter, and accessible on your IPhones and IPads;
The revolution will be live.”

1Presented at the Claremont Graduate University Stauffer Symposium in honor of Michael Scriven,
20 August, 2011

NEA Webinar on Evaluating Arts Grant Portfolios

Live, Public Webinar on October 17, 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EDT

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) will host a webinar on Evaluating Arts Grant Portfolios on Oct. 17, 2017, the third in a series of webinars showcasing evaluation and performance measurement strategies in the arts. Guest speakers Renae Youngs, Director of Research and Evaluation for the Minnesota State Arts Board, and Sara Nash, Program Director (Dance) for the New England Foundation for the Arts, present two distinct approaches to grant portfolio evaluation and also discuss the unique challenges to conducting this work in the arts. A Q&A session will follow the guest-speaker presentations. This webinar is appropriate for state arts agency and regional arts organization leaders and for researchers and evaluators working with state arts agencies and regional arts organizations.

The webinar takes place on Oct. 17, 2017 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EDT. It is free and open to the public. Advance registration is not possible; please join the webinar at the time of the event by visiting https://www.arts.gov/event/2017/evaluating-arts-grant-portfolios.

Please note that the web meeting will be limited to the first 125 attendees; up to 300 can listen on the phone. An archive will be made available shortly after the meeting. Attendees will be muted but able to type in questions and comments through a text Q&A box. An archive of the webinar will be available at https://arts.gov/videos/webinars. Any media interested in participating should contact Victoria Hutter at hutterv@arts.gov<mailto:hutterv@arts.gov>.

Funding Opportunities – Native Arts and Cultures Foundation

Be the first to hear about the next call for submissions by signing up for our e-news, following us on social media, or checking back nearer to the season.

At times of open calls, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation accepts electronic grant applications. More information is provided on how to apply when calls for submissions are announced.

Learn More!

Free! AIGC Journey to College Turtle Map

The turtle is seen as strength and solidarity, is old, wise, well respected and teaches us patience and never to give up.

Order free maps online here: http://www.aigcs.org/aigc-publications/aigc-journey-to-college-turtle-map/

An Artful August

August is full of opportunities to support our local solo artists and artist communities. Find the nearest art show or festival and bring the whole family for art exhibits, demonstrations, fun runs and even live art performances!

August 25th-27th

2018 Mother Tongue Film Festival – Now accepting Film Submissions!

2018 Mother Tongue Film Festival – Now accepting Film Submissions!

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC/USA

http://recoveringvoices.si.edu/MTFF.html

Films will be accepted until September 1, 2017.

 

About the Mother Tongue Film Festival

The Mother Tongue Film Festival, a collaborative Smithsonian annual event, initiated by the Recovering Voices Program of the National Museum of Natural History, celebrates the United Nations International Mother Languages Day by showcasing recently produced feature and short-length films about the cultural richness of Indigenous and endangered languages.

Partners

The Mother Tongue Film Festival is a collaboration between Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Programming support has also been provided by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Funding support for the Mother Tongue Film Festival has been provided by the three Smithsonian Recovering Voices partners across the Institution: National Museum of the American Indian, National Museum of Natural History and the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, with additional support from the Mexican Cultural Institute and the New Zealand Embassy. This program has also received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Submitting a film for the 2018 MTFF? Complete the 2018 MTFF Film Submission Link

Please complete the online submission form – and email RecoveringVoices@si.edu with any questions.

IRP Conference Art Competition Now Accepting Submissions

Indigenous International Repatriation Conference Art Competition
NOW ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS

Judges for this art call welcome artists and photographers whose works fit into our conference theme, Journey Home: Empowering Indigenous Communities in International Repatriation. Work should reflect the artist’s vision surrounding this very important human rights issue.

This competition is open to all artists/photographers 18 years of age or older. Entries must be created in any still medium: painting, drawing, photography, sculpture, digital art, prints, fiber art, collage, installations. Artists will be asked to submit a photograph of their artwork and complete the requirements of the art submission online.

For more information visit:
www.indian-affairs.org/art-competition.html

Kids Art Contest!

We see it when we believe it.  Each one of us has a choice: to focus our energy on obstacles or opportunities. To fixate on our problems, or focus on solutions.  We can harp on what’s wrong with the world  (see most news media), or we can cultivate what’s right with the world. What we focus on grows.   

That’s why the Life is Good community shares one simple, unifying mission: to spread the power of optimism. 

*Learn more!