Must See Video – Discrimination in America: Native American Experiences

 

After watching the video “DISCRIMINATION IN AMERICA: Native American Experiences” presented in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR I knew I had to share. Watch it for yourself by clicking on the link below. This will be an eye-opener to those who are unaware of the discrimination Native Americans face on a daily basis and in the workplace. As 2017 comes to a close, let’s all promise to begin 2018 with an open mind and heart.

Link to Video: https://theforum.sph.harvard.edu/events/discrimination-in-america-2/ 

 

1st Annual Seminole Tribe of Florida Renewable Energy & Sustainability Conference

1st Annual Seminole Tribe of Florida Renewable Energy &

Sustainability Conference

Join Us February 7 – 9, 2018

·    Hear about innovative new projects

·    Network with tribal professionals

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

Tribal Officials, Tribal Housing Departments, Utility Staff, Tribal Code Officials, and Construction Staff

Limited to 80 seats.

Registration will open January 1st, 2018

Hosted at:

Native Learning Center

6363 Taft Street

Hollywood, FL 33024

 

Click to download the flyer

Q & A Session with Honoring Nations

Are you thinking of applying to the 2018 Honoring Nations award in good governance?  Do you have questions about eligibility, the application process, or the criteria?  If so, please join us for a Q & A session and let us answer your questions! Participation is not mandatory; however applicants are encouraged to participate.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 at 4pm EST
The toll-free call in number: 1-866-889-3913
The Conference Passcode: HN18

The Harvard Project’s Honoring Nations program invites applications from American Indian governments across a broad range of subject areas including:

  • Cultural Affairs
  • Economic and Community Development
  • Education
  • Environment and Natural Resources
  • Government Performance
  • Health and Social Services
  • Intergovernmental Relations
  • Justice

The 2018 Honoring Nations awardees will receive a monetary grant to share their stories of success: $2000 for honors and $5000 for high honors.  Awardees will also be featured in case profiles, nation-building curriculum, Google platforms, and through world-class exhibits showcased at the Smithsonian Institution.

At the heart of Honoring Nations is the principle that tribes themselves hold the key to positive social, political, cultural, and economic prosperity—and that self-governance plays a crucial role in building and sustaining strong, healthy Indian nations.  Honored programs give decision-makers fresh ideas about how to create sustainable economies, improve service delivery, protect and manage vital resources, administer justice, and educate tribal citizens.

Applications are due January 24, 2018 For additional information about this program, please contact:

SIGN UP

Free Webinar: USDA National Organic Program

FREE WEBINAR!

USDA National Organic Program: Is Organic an Option for Me?
Thursday, December 7, 2017
11 a.m. Pacific / Noon Mountain / 1 p.m. Central / 2 p.m Eastern

Join the USDA National Organic Program staff as they share information about the USDA organic regulations, what the organic label means, and how to become USDA Certified Organic. Learn about the wide variety of USDA resources available to farmers, ranchers and other businesses looking to join the organic sector.

Topics include:

  • Origin of the U.S. Organic Sector
  • What is Organic?
  • National Organic Program
  • The Organic Community
  • Organic Agriculture — The Basics
  • Understanding the Organic Label
  • Role of Certifiers
  • Getting Certified
  • Market Overview
  • USDA Resources

Presenter:

Vanessa Garcia Polanco, USDA National Organic Program

WPT Premieres 3 New Tribal Histories Episodes in December 2017!

On Wisconsin Public Television (WPT)

Tribal Histories
7:30 P.M. Dec. 14, 21, and 28
Three new episodes of Tribal Histories will premiere on WPT this December 2017:

December 14 — Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe History
December 21 — Mole Lake Ojibwe History
December 28 — St. Croix Ojibwe History

Recorded in natural settings, Tribal Histories feature tribal members sharing the challenges, triumphs, and time-honored traditions that have shaped their vibrant nations and communities across generations.

Currently, the following documentaries were released in the Tribal Histories project in previous years:

 

For more information go to Tribal Histories website at the WPT.

 

Help support diverse media voices!

The bidding has begun for Tribal College Journal’s annual online charity auction! Bidding ends on Monday, December 4 at 9 p.m..
Items up for auction include a tipi, jewelry, books, a star quilt, a Pendleton blanket, artwork, photography, vacation stays, and more!
All proceeds benefit Tribal College Journal’s work to share news and information about tribal higher education and opportunity in Indian Country.
Questions?

Today on Native America Calling!

Thursday November 23, 2017 – Indigenous Comic Con re-broadcast 

We’re going to revisit one of our favorite recent shows from the Indigenous Comic Con.  The event at Isleta Resort and Casino was a successful gathering of Native comic book creators, filmmakers, authors, artists and enthusiasts. Our live broadcast from the con touched in with comic book creators about why telling Native stories through action-packed sagas is important.

Native America Calling is a national call-in program that invites guests and listeners to join a dialogue about current events, music, arts, entertainment and culture.

The program is hosted by Tara Gatewood (Isleta Pueblo) and airs live each weekday from 1-2 pm Eastern.

Join the conversation by calling 1-800-996-2848.

New Grant Available to Improve Nutritional Health and Food Sovereignty for American Indian Communities

The new Fertile Ground Grant Program funds tribes, Native advocates, Native youth, and Native-led organizations to create sustainable community health improvements through nutrition and food sovereignty
efforts. The grants of up to $35,000 will provide support for:
1. Native-led convening to identify community health priorities
2. Advocacy and policy strategies that address improving health outcomes
3. Access to healthy food
4. Food sovereignty work rooted in tradition, culture, and Indigenous knowledge
The program is funded by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community through its Seeds of Native Health philanthropic campaign and the American Heart Association through its Voices for Healthy Kids campaign. The American Indian Cancer Foundation will administer the program.
Applications for grants are due December 19, 2017.  Apply at:
https://www.americanindiancancer.org/fertile-ground-grant

Poster: American Indian Perspectives on Thanksgiving

*Click to view the PDF by the National Museum of the American Indian.

Each November educators across the country teach their
students about the First Thanksgiving, a quintessentially
American holiday. They try to give students an accurate
picture of what happened in Plymouth in 1621 and explain how
that event fits into American history. Unfortunately, many teaching
materials give an incomplete, if not inaccurate, portrayal of the first
Thanksgiving, particularly of the event’s Native American
participants.

IPE TIG Week: Introduction to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG by Erica Roberts and Nicole Bowman

Erica Roberts

Hello and welcome to the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG Week (November 19-24)! I am Erica Blue Roberts, a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, IPE TIG Program Chair, and AEA GEDI alumnus. And I’m Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape) the IPE TIG Chair. As we approach the Colonial celebration and Federal holiday of Thanksgiving, let us reflect on, redefine our understandings, and redirect our behaviors regarding the Original inhabitants of Turtle Island (North America) and Kukuna Auhy (Mother Earth). Together we can move from cultural appropriation and romanticized notions of the first Thanksgiving, to a cultural appreciation for the ongoing contributions by Indigenous people that isn’t limited by a holiday or season.

The IPE TIG was established in 2006 to give voice and recognition to the Indigenous members of the American Evaluation Association (AEA) and begin to infuse Indigenous evaluation practices into more mainstream evaluation. Indigenous evaluation approaches were developed as culturally-responsive ways of evaluating programs in Indigenous communities. Indigenous evaluation often values and incorporates Indigenous knowledge, recognizes the negative history of evaluation imposed on many Indigenous communities, and respects tribal and data sovereignty. For more information about Indigenous evaluation, look to the work of IPE TIG Founder – Joan France, IPE TIG Founder – Fiona Cram, IPE TIG Chair – Nicky Bowman, and IPE TIG Program Chair – Erica Roberts.

The IPE TIG strives to achieve the following goals to improve evaluation practices and methods:

  • Developing and disseminating knowledge that helps assure that evaluations in which Indigenous people are among the major stakeholders are culturally responsive and respectful of their interests and rights.
  • Creating a venue for Indigenous evaluators and others working in Indigenous contexts to participate in discourse about evaluation models and methods that support Indigenous values, practices, and ways of knowing.
  • Mentoring and emerging evaluators interested in evaluation in various Indigenous contexts.

This week you will get a chance to read about a variety of Indigenous evaluation topics from the TIG Leadership and its members. We chose to blog this week as it is the week of the Thanksgiving holiday, a time when many misconceptions about American Indians and Alaska Natives are shared. We hope that by providing you with an overview of Indigenous evaluation, you may be inspired to look into other ways that Indigenous knowledge can be integrated into mainstream practices and understandings.

Rad Resources:

To learn more about the IPE TIG, please visit our website., become a member, and check us out on Facebook and Twitter.

No More Pranks-Giving:  How the Evaluation Community Can Start Rebuilding Relations with Indigenous Communities

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee) Native Appropriations website and blog is an interactive forum for discussing representations and contributions of Native peoples.

Rethinking Schools Blog Archives on “Rethinking Thanksgiving:  Myths and Misgivings

The American Evaluation Association is celebrating Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation (IPE) TIG week. All posts this week are contributed by members of the IPE Topical Interest Group. Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org. aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

 

*Info originally posted: http://aea365.org/blog/ipe-tig-week-introduction-to-the-indigenous-peoples-in-evaluation-tig-by-erica-roberts-and-nicole-bowman/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+aea365+%28AEA365%29