Teaching STEM In Ways that Respect and Build Upon Indigenous Peoples’ Rights

What Is The Issue?

Indigenous ways of knowing are sometimes thought to be in opposition to and detrimental to the learning of Western Science or STEM. Consequently, indigenous ways of knowing are rarely engaged to support learning. If STEM learning is to be meaningful and transformative for Indigenous youth, respecting Indigenous peoples rights and related critical issues, including Indigenous STEM, settler-colonialism, and decolonization, must be understood and explicitly addressed in Indigenous youths’ informal and formal STEM learning experiences.

Find out more!

American Indian Science & Engineering Society Opportunity for STEM students

Apply for the 4th “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” cohort! 

In 2014, AISES was awarded a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create the “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” program. The program’s goal is to increase the representation of American Indians, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty positions at universities and tribal colleges across the country. The program aims to create an intergenerational community of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and junior and senior faculty members.

This full circle of support will help guide students to successful degree completion and advancement to the next stage on the academic career path. In addition to full circle mentorship, the program strives to provide students with valuable academic and professional support, travel funding, and educational, research, fellowship, and internship opportunities.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Full time undergraduate student, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar in a field within Biological Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Geosciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, STEM Education, or Engineering at an accredited four-year college/university or two-year college. Must be enrolled in a program leading to an academic degree.
  • Interest in becoming a faculty member at a college, university, or tribal college.
  • Have a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or higher cumulative grade point average (GPA), with consideration being given to applicants reflecting somewhat lower GPAs but with high potential to raise the GPA above 3.0.
  • Current member of AISES.

Selection of students will seek balance with respect to a diversity of tribes, geographic areas in the United States, STEM majors, and gender. While the focus is primarily on American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and Native Hawaiians, all AISES members are eligible. The selection process will attempt to ensure that a diversity of STEM disciplines is reflected.

Scholars in the program will receive an annual participation stipend of $2,250 for two years, and two years of travel funding to attend the AISES National Conference and AISES Leadership Summit or discipline-specific professional conference. Scholars will be matched with an AISES selected faculty mentor to interact with at least monthly.  Scholars are required to participate in skill-building, professional-development in-person programming and webinars. Finally, scholars will have the opportunity to engage in an active community of Native STEM researchers.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

  • You must be either an undergraduate student, graduate student, or post-doctoral fellow to apply.
  • Complete the “Lighting the Pathway” application online:http://www.aises.org/content/lighting-pathway
  • Submit the following supporting documents to bhall@aises.org:
    • Unofficial transcript(s)
    • CV/Resume
    • One Letter of Recommendation
  • All applications and supporting documents must be received by July 24, 2017.

If you have any questions, please contact Kathy DeerInWater at kdeerinwater@aises.orgor 720-552-6123 ext. 107.

BEGIN APPLICATION

Fourth International CREA Conference

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). Early registration rate deadline AUGUST 25, 2017

*More info to come!

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

CRCAIH 2017 Pilot Grant Seminar Series

Final Presentation of the 2017 Pilot Grant Seminar Series 
If you can’t join us in person, register to listen live online.

East-Metro American Indian Diabetes Initiative: An Evaluation of Innovative Community-based Programs to Improve the Health of Native Men and Youth

Tai Mendenhall, PhD, University of Minnesota, Family Social Sciences

Date: August 7, 2017

Time: 9:00AM – 10:00AM 

Register

NIHB Funding Opportunity for Public Health Accreditation

Applications Due September 1, 2017
 
The National Indian Health Board (NIHB) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are pleased to announce a new funding cycle for the Tribal Accreditation Support Initiative (Tribal ASI).
WHAT IS TRIBAL ASI? Tribal ASI is a funding and technical assistance program offered by NIHB to eligible Tribal entities to accomplish objectives toward meeting the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) Standards and Measures in order to achieve public health accreditation.
WHY DO TRIBES CHOOSE TO SEEK PUBLIC HEALTH ACCREDITATION?

Tribes have identified the following benefits to public health accreditation efforts:
  • Credibility
  • Improved Quality of Services
  • Improved Health of the Community
  • Staff Pride
  • Improved State and Local Relations
  • Population Health Protection Assurances
  • Sovereignty
WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR TRIBAL ASI? Official health entities of federally recognized Tribal governments, Tribal organization, or inter-Tribal consortiums, as defined in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, as amended.
HOW MUCH FUNDING IS AVAILABLE? Up to $10,500 is available to each awardee.
BEGINNER COHORT NEW THIS YEAR! There will be a separate funding category for Tribal entities new to public health accreditation who wish to explore, in-depth, the potential of achieving public health accreditation with the option of taking the first steps on a path toward achieving such accreditation.  The Beginner Cohort will receive training, form a team, conduct a self-assessment and devise a plan for moving forward.
WHAT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (TA) FOR PUBLIC HEALTH ACCREDITATION IS PROVIDED?NIHB conducts monthly one-on-one TA for awardees, national webinars, training opportunities at NIHB national conferences, a monthly Tribal Accreditation Learning Community (TALC), and networking with other Tribal, national and regional resources.
HOW CAN FUNDS BE SPENT? Acceptable uses: Staff wages, Supplies, Equipment, Training, Travel, Printing, Media, Meeting Expenses, Incentives, Consultants
WHAT TYPE OF PROJECTS WILL THE ASI AWARD FUND? Some of the projects that have been funded in the past by ASI funds include developing and implementing:
Community Health Assessments ● Community Health Improvement Plans ● Workforce Development Plans ● Performance Management Systems ● Quality Improvement Plans ● Departmental Strategic Plans ● Documentation Review/Mock Site Visits ● Self-Assessments ●  Stakeholder and Community Engagement Activities
Work toward any of the PHAB domains will be considered as well as other activities related to public health accreditation readiness. See the PHAB Standards and Measures v1.5 for domain descriptions.www.phaboard.org
The request for applications (RFA) can be downloaded, completed as a Word document, then turned into a PDF for submission. Completed applications are due to NIHB via email by Friday, September 1, 2017, by11:59pm Eastern Time.   

2017 AIRA Meeting Call for Papers and Posters

The 2017 AIRA Meeting will take place FridaySaturday, and Sunday, October 20 – 21, 2017, with

Pre-Conference Workshops on Thursday, October 19, 2017.

 

The call for papers and posters is now open! Please see http://www.americanindigenousresearchassociation.org/annual-meeting/ for details. Abstracts are due to Lori Lambert (22leaningtree@gmail.com) no later than August 30.

Native Americans in Philanthropy now hiring!

Native Americans in Philanthropy (NAP) is excited to announce the opening of an office in Los Angeles, California! Working with the Minneapolis office, this addition will bring many new and exciting opportunities to engage more closely to the work happening on the ground and to strengthen our national outreach. Together, these offices will continue building connections between grantmakers and Native organizations and communities by engaging and educating philanthropic leaders about the issues facing Native communities across the country. Two offices will also increase NAP’s visibility, activity, and accessibility to different movements and our network of members, partners, and allies.

To better serve the network, we are also expanding our team! We are looking for great people to join our work in promoting reciprocity and investment in, with and for Native peoples to build healthy and sustainable communities. NAP is a powerful network of Native and non-Native nonprofits, tribal communities, foundations and community leaders committed to engaging, learning and sharing resources and best practices grounded the Native tradition of reciprocity.

We encourage highly motivated, talented, and dynamic individuals to apply for the following positions at our new L.A. office:

Help us find the right candidates by spreading the word! Share with your networks and encourage anyone you think may be interested to apply.

*Info from http://nativephilanthropy.org/

2018 Mother Tongue Film Festival – Now accepting Film Submissions!

2018 Mother Tongue Film Festival – Now accepting Film Submissions!

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC/USA

http://recoveringvoices.si.edu/MTFF.html

Films will be accepted until September 1, 2017.

 

About the Mother Tongue Film Festival

The Mother Tongue Film Festival, a collaborative Smithsonian annual event, initiated by the Recovering Voices Program of the National Museum of Natural History, celebrates the United Nations International Mother Languages Day by showcasing recently produced feature and short-length films about the cultural richness of Indigenous and endangered languages.

Partners

The Mother Tongue Film Festival is a collaboration between Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian and the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Programming support has also been provided by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

Funding support for the Mother Tongue Film Festival has been provided by the three Smithsonian Recovering Voices partners across the Institution: National Museum of the American Indian, National Museum of Natural History and the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, with additional support from the Mexican Cultural Institute and the New Zealand Embassy. This program has also received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Submitting a film for the 2018 MTFF? Complete the 2018 MTFF Film Submission Link

Please complete the online submission form – and email RecoveringVoices@si.edu with any questions.

Call for Authors: American Literature in Context

Dr. Linda De Roche of Wesley College in Delaware is looking for contributors to an encyclopedia project on American literature that she is producing and there are a large number of Native writers and texts that are still unassigned. As she notes in her message appended below, Native writers are very often omitted from these types of projects, so if you or someone you know has the expertise and time to write one or more of these entries, it would be a valuable service.

*Note: They are looking for north east and Delaware or Lenape contributors.

Contact info:

Linda De Roche, Ph.D.
Professor of English and American Studies
Wesley College
120 North State Street
Dover, DE 19901

Linda.DeRoche@wesley.edu
Direct: 302.736.2454
Website: http://www.wesley.edu

Native Voices Rising

Native Voices Rising (NVR) provides general operating support grants to strengthen Native-led organizations in the United States. This grantmaking collaborative between Native Americans in Philanthropy and the Common Counsel Foundation is designed to support organizing, advocacy and civic engagement in American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities. To-date a total of nearly $410,000 has been awarded to 43 grassroots Native community organizations that are involved in a organizing and advocacy.

Previous grantees are collectively engaging thousands of community members across ten states. They focus on a wide range of critical issues, from human and civil rights, to reproductive justice, environmental health and sacred sites protection. Past NVR grantees had a significant presence at Standing Rock, advocating against the Dakota Access pipeline for the protection of land, water, and the recognition of Native sovereignty.

NVR is open until AUGUST 2, 2017 for applications by Native-led groups with a membership base in the community that have a leadership development program and seek to take collective action to win progressive social change.

Please share with your network! Donors that would like to add funds to this years pool can contribute online or contact Common Counsel Foundation at info@commoncounsel.org. Grantees can find more information and apply at www.NativeVoicesRising.org. NVR will make grants of up to $10,000 to support grassroots organizing led by Native communities.