Hiring! Assistant Professor of Environment, Health, and/or Governance

University of Washington-Seattle Campus: College of Arts and Sciences: American Indian Studies

Assistant Professor of Environment, Health, and/or Governance

Location: Seattle, WA

Closes: Dec 1, 2017at 11:59 PM Eastern Time

(GMT-4 hours)

The Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Washington seeks a full-time (100% FTE, 9-month term), tenure-track Assistant Professor whose research and teaching engages American Indian and Indigenous Studies through the study of environment, health, and/or governance. The successful candidate will be trained in the social and/or natural sciences (or related fields) and have experience with tribal communities. Scholars whose work intersects with Indigenous health and wellness, climate change, economic development, politics, transnationalism, and environmental concerns as they relate to tribal resource management are of particular interest. Ideal candidates should have scholarship addressing the entangled relations among Indigenous nations; Indigenous communities; federal, state, and local governments; Western science; capitalism; Indigenous cultural revitalization movements; and/or Indigenous knowledges.  All University of Washington faculty engage in teaching, research and service.

American Indian Studies (AIS) at UW is a multidisciplinary academic department that offers an undergraduate major and minor. It is also home to the Native Voices graduate program in Indigenous film, video, and digital media. The department’s faculty members represent a range of disciplines and approach their teaching and research from a decolonizing, community-based, and global perspective. The department works with national and regional Indigenous communities through the UW Tribal Leadership Summit, Native American Advisory Board, the UW wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ Intellectual House, as well as campus symposia and conferences. AIS is a campus leader in facilitating the recruitment and retention of American Indians, First Nations, and Indigenous faculty and students.

QUALIFICATIONS

The successful candidate will demonstrate the potential for excellence in research, teaching, service, mentorship, and community engagement. A Ph.D. (or foreign equivalent) or comparable terminal degree must be in hand by the start date. The appointment will begin in September 2018.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Please submit a letter of application, your curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, two relevant course syllabi, and a writing sample (either a published journal article, book chapter, or chapter from your dissertation) to:

http://apply.interfolio.com/45756

Preference will be given to applications received by November 15. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

Call for Submissions: Decolonize This

Call for submissions due October 30!

In nearly a year of a Trump presidency, the visibility of White supremacists has risen. Corporate and government partnership has brought back the Dakota Access and Keystone oil pipelines even amid the visceral impacts of climate change in this year’s devastating hurricanes and wildfires. Yet, the destructive course we’re on isn’t surprising given North America’s colonial history, where wealth was built on cultural oppression, land dispossession, and the exploitation of both people and land. What disruptive forces are destructive enough andcreative enough to transcend this legacy?

Decolonization is needed. We heard it loudly at Standing Rock. We hear it every day from oppressed people. But what does that look like? Is it all or nothing? Does the idea of it differ by generation? How much is really possible? And who benefits—how might breaking free from systems of White supremacy be liberating for everyone?

To answer these questions, YES! will turn to Indian Country. We’re looking for powerful ideas and evidence of solutions and profound change headed our way—and we’re looking for Native writers to tell these stories.

Subject areas might include:

  • The future of the White male-centered dominant culture. The aging of the general population, the unique disruptive force that millennials present. The increasingly multi-ethnic population.
  • The human relationship to the ecosystem.
  • The changing nature of dissent as Indigenous movements become global and social media allows people to find their community despite where they live.
  • Land reform and reconnection to land and water. Rights versus responsibilities to the natural world.
  • Language and cultural revitalization. How are Indigenous cultures experiencing renewal in the modern world? How do we combat cultural and political amnesia? How do we differentiate among appropriation, appreciation, and sharing?
  • What of truth, reconciliation, and governmental apologies? What might be an Indigenous approach to healing centered on responsibilities, resurgence, and relationships?
  • What kind of economic development can connect Indigenous homelands, cultures, and communities?
  • Solidarity and allies. What have we learned in the year after Standing Rock, when Native communities here joined the global Indigenous movement in challenging corporate-government systems that destroy sacred land and water for profit? How was Standing Rock a movement for decolonization?
  • What might a just nation-to-nation relationship among Indigenous nations and settlers look like?

Are you an Indigenous writer or photographer who has an idea for a reported feature, deeply researched think piece, or personal essay that belongs in this issue of YES! Magazine? Send pitches and leads to decolonize@yesmagazine.org.

Dr. Jolene Bowman Named President of NIEA

Dr. Jolene Bowman, Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Vice President and WIEA Board Member to be sworn-in as NIEA President
Swearing in to take place on Saturday, October 7th at 48th Annual National Indian Education Association Convention & Trade Show in Orlando, FL

ORLANDO, FL – After waiting nearly a year to take her seat as the board president of the National Indian Education Association, Dr. Jolene Bowman will officially take the reigns this afternoon when she is sworn-in at the organization’s 48th Annual Convention & Trade Show at the Caribe Royal Orlando Hotel and Convention Center.

Dr. Bowman brings with her a strong presence and solid understanding of the issues facing American Indian students and communities. Hailing from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians of Wisconsin, where she serves as the tribe’s governing board Vice President, Bowman has long been a proponent of widening the educational opportunities of American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

“I plan to use my new position to advocate for Indian education and Native students by getting in the know about the particular subject or issue students may be experiencing,” said Bowman. “I not only want to work through those challenges but also celebrate the accomplishments of our people.”

Bowman was elected president at last year’s NIEA convention held in Reno, NV. and has spent the last year building momentum for her new post through her work as both secretary for the organization and board member of the Wisconsin Indian Education Association.

WIEA president Brian Jackson says he’s excited to see the impact Bowman will have on Indian education in Wisconsin and across the nation.

“I’m confident Dr. Bowman will continue NIEA’s efforts to increase educational opportunities for Native students everywhere,” said Jackson. “Women are the backbone of our Native communities. She has a strong sense of identity and has demonstrated her ability to lead through her previous successes working in tribal communities,” added Jackson, who traveled to Orlando in support of Bowman and Wisconsin Indian education.

One of Bowman’s first orders of business as NIEA president will be to address the growing funding needs of Indian education at the federal level.

“NIEA is the only organization that is exclusively working on behalf of native students to ensure that our trust responsibility is being upheld,” said Bowman, referring to the federal government’s treaty and trust responsibility to American Indian tribes.

“In the current context, Indian education was under attack in the last (federal) budget and NIEA will continue to work diligently to ensure our Native schools and Native student populations are funded,” Bowman added.

Bowman will serve a one (1) year term as board president, which will run concurrent to her other obligations in Wisconsin.

The 48th annual NIEA Convention & Tradeshow runs October 4 – 7, 2017, in Orlando, FL.

New Teacher Recruitment Resource Now Live!

NIEA Announces Launch of Teacher Recruitment Website
The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) is excited to announce the launch of a new resource to support Native serving schools recruit great teachers. In partnership with The New Teacher Project (TNTP), a national education non-profit organization, we have launched teach.niea.org– a teacher recruitment website specifically designed to support Native schools recruit and hire great teachers.
Education connects our past and our future-protecting the uniqueness of our cultural identity. Numerous states across the country are experiencing shortages- Native serving schools in rural areas are often the most negatively impacted. Native teachers only make up only 0.5%of teachers nationwide and our students suffer as a result. This new resource will help Native schools equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to thrive in the classroom and beyond.
Native schools are looking for Native teachers with:
  • Commitment: Culturally-responsive teachers who embed culture into curriculum and instruction–preparing students to graduate ready for college, career, and community success.
  • Adaptability: Teachers with a nuanced understanding of the challenges Native students face, sensitive to the unique cultures of individual tribes and students, comfortable with productive struggle, and responsive to cultural differences while upholding the belief that all children can learn.
  • Instructional Expertise: Teachers who know their subjects inside and out; who understand the importance of instructional planning, using a challenging curriculum to empower students to learn; and who never stop learning and improving themselves.
  • Respect for Sovereignty, Identity, and Self-Determination: Teachers focused on shaping future leaders, honoring tribal languages and traditions, and protecting cultural identity.
  • Qualifications in High-Demand Areas: Teachers with middle and high school, SPED, STEM, and language and culture certification.
Please take a few minutes today and share this opportunity with educators you know. Thank you for helping us protect our most precious resource-our youth, those who will carry on our culture, language, and traditions.
About The National Indian Education Association (NIEA)
NIEA is the Nation’s most inclusive advocacy organization advancing comprehensive culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Formed by Native educators in 1969 to encourage a national discourse on education, NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles- to convene educators to explore ways to improve schools and the educational systems serving Native children; to promote the maintenance and continued development of language and cultural programs; and to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and decision makers. For more information visit www.niea.org.
Donate to NIEA

Whether you’re an educator, a student, or invested in increasing educational opportunities for Native students, NIEA members help advocate for better policies. Your  contribution will help us continue to be effective advocates, train educators that work with Native students, and close the achievement gap.  To donate, please click HERE.

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017 by Jayne Corso

Posted: 30 Sep 2017 05:06 AM PDT

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017 is just a month away! I have compiled a few ways you can prepare for joining us in Washington D.C. using some social media tools.

Hot Tip: Follow AEA on Social Media

Follow AEA on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the conference. We will be sharing key deadlines, education updates, and announcements about what to except during Evaluation 2017.

Hot Tip: Follow #Eval17 on Twitter

If you are active on Twitter, start following our conference hashtag, #Eval17. Many members of the evaluation community are using this hashtag to discuss their presentations and start conversations before Evaluation 2017 even starts. Don’t be shy, join the conversation!

Hot Tip: Search for Speakers

Connect with Evaluation 2017 speakers on Twitter. Many of our speakers are active on twitter and share relevant evaluation resources. Start following these speakers and make a connection before you step foot in D.C.

I hope these tips help you prepare for your trip to Evaluation 2017. Stay tuned for more tips on how to use social media and connect with AEA online during the conference. I look forward to seeing everyone in D.C.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Free Webinar: “Native Infusion: Honoring Ancestral Beverages”

FREE WEBINAR!

Native Infusion: A Guide to Honoring Ancestral Beverages to Uphold our Health
Wednesday, November 8, 2017
11 a.m. Pacific / Noon Mountain / 1 p.m. Central / 2 p.m. Eastern

Coming up in the free First Nations Knowledge webinar series is Native Infusion: A Guide to Honoring Ancestral Beverages to Uphold our Health. Join us as we unpack a toolkit that aims to encourage tribal communities to put down the sugary drinks and consume more of our heritage by increasing consumption of water, teas, broths and smoothies. We will share examples of culturally-relevant beverages, strategic community-level interventions, and how to design your own ancestral beverage campaign.


Our Presenter

Valerie Segrest is a Native nutrition educator who specializes in local and traditional foods. As an enrolled member of the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, she serves her community as the coordinator of the Muckleshoot Food Sovereignty Project and also works as the Traditional Foods and Medicines Program Manager.

In 2010, she co-authored the book Feeding the People, Feeding the Spirit: Revitalizing Northwest Coastal Indian Food Culture. She is a Kellogg Fellow at the Institute of Agriculture and Trade Policy. Valerie inspires and enlightens others about the importance of a nutrient-dense diet through a simple, common-sense approach to eating. Learn more about Valerie here: http://www.tedxrainier.com/speakers/valerie-segrest/.

NOTE: Related to this webinar, First Nations has also launched a new, online FDPIR Toolkit that provides resources related to healthy cooking with food items provided in Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) packages, plus materials from Valerie’s “Native Infusion” project. The toolkit contains cookbooks, videos, posters, the “Native Infusion” book by Valerie and Elise Krohn, and other materials.

*Information from http://www.firstnations.org/

NAP’s 2018 Philanthropy Institute

Save the Date!

12th Biennial Philanthropy Institute to take place June 13-15, 2018 at the Hyatt Regency Tamaya Resort & Spa in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico.

Policy Analysis: Native Students and Their White Peers

Many see education as the key to future opportunity and success for children of all backgrounds. However, deeply entrenched inequities can obstruct future opportunities and successes for many American Indian and Alaska Native students (hereafter referred to as Native students). These inequities are apparent in the substantial achievement gap that exists between Native students and their white peers. On national reading and mathematics exams, Native students perform two to three grade levels below their white peers. Additionally, Native students face myriad difficulties outside of the classroom, including high levels of poverty and challenges with both physical and mental wellness.

Despite these problems, opportunities exist for action that could positively impact educational outcomes for Native students. This report provides an overview of the major education issues the Native student population faces and the current policies that exist to address those issues at the federal and state levels.

View State and Federal Policy: Native American youth by ECS online as PDF

Resource: Equity and ESSA Leveraging Educational Opportunity Through the Every Student Succeeds Act

Despite the American promise of equal educational opportunity for all students, persistent achievement gaps among more and less advantaged groups of students remain, along with the opportunity gaps that create disparate outcomes. However, the recent passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) represents an opportunity for the federal government, states, districts, and schools to equitably design education systems to
ensure that the students who have historically been underserved by these same education systems receive an education that prepares them for the demands of the 21st century.

ESSA contains a number of new provisions that can be used to advance equity and excellence throughout our nation’s schools for students of color, low-income students, English learners, students with disabilities, and those who are homeless or in foster care. We review these provisions in four major areas: (1) access to learning opportunities focused on higher-order thinking skills; (2) multiple measures of equity; (3) resource equity; and (4) evidence-based interventions. Each of the provisions can be leveraged by educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates to advance equity in education for all students.

 

View entire report online (PDF)

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.