Search Results for: implementation

New Education for Sustainability Benchmarks Developed to Guide Adoption, Implementation

The Journal of Sustainability Education is seeking exemplars of education for sustainability (EfS) as defined by the Individual and Social Learning benchmarks released on Earth Day 2017. They are inviting curriculum plans, assessment instruments, performance indicators, quality criteria, and exemplary student work in order to create an open source database for the field.

Source: http://greenschoolsnationalnetwork.org/new-education-sustainability-benchmarks-developed-guide-adoption-implementation/

For the benchmarks: http://www.susted.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/EfS-Benchmarks-1.1a.pdf

Choice Neighborhoods Implementation Grants due Feb. 9, 2015

Subject to appropriations, HUD Individual grant awards up to a maximum of $30MM. NOFA & application package at www.grants.gov CFDA # 14.889

Additional information: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/public_indian_housing/ih/codetalk/fundingprogram and at www.hud.gov/cn

NOFA includes 2 bonus points for applicants working with entities designated as having Preferred Sustainability Status.

The ANA 2015 Grant Application for Museums, Libraries, & Cultural Organizations: Planning & Implementation Grants Due January 15, 2015

The National Endowment for the Humanities grants provide support for museums, libraries, historic places, and other organizations that produce public programs in the humanities. Planning Grants support the early stages of project development; and Implementation Grants support final scholarly research and consultation, design development, production, and installation of a project for presentation to the public. ELIGIBILITY: U.S. nonprofit organizations, state and local governmental agencies, and federally recognized Indian tribal governments. Planning Grants: $40,000 to $75,000 over a period of 1 year; Implementation Grants: Maximum of $1,000,000 over a period of up to 3 years. Link to RFP: http://www.neh.gov/grants/mlco

 

Need Help with your ANA Grant Application? Sign up to attend ANA Pre-application Training or find resources online.  

Find a training near you at:http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana/events

Resources online: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ana/assistance/applicant-training-technical-assistance

 

 

Vice President of Research and Evaluation role at IFF

Responsibilities:

The Vice President for Research and Evaluation will be responsible for the following:

Grow research consulting business

  • Innovate in response to marketplace: develop research consulting products that inform and guide social impact investments into social service sectors and comprehensive community development.
  • Prepare and manage annual budget for research department. Manage projects and staff time to meet established utilization rate and financial sustainability goals.
  • Develop client outreach strategy to maintain pipeline of contracted and grant supported research projects. Grow research network through meetings, presentations and marketing. Coordinate with regional staff, EDs and SVPs/VPs in selling research products.
  • Coordinate with Resource Development Department to identify funders and raise philanthropic dollars for research projects.
  • Evaluate internal tools for potential commercialization and work to bring those tools to market.

Oversee research team and portfolio

  • Maintain IFF research brand: ensure all studies and research products maintain IFF’s high standard of rigor, integrity and intellectual independence, while being pragmatic and actionable with practical recommendations based in best practice.
  • Develop project proposals and budgets. Negotiate contracts. Manage grants and funder relationships. Collaborate in funder report preparation, as necessary.
  • Support, inspire and guide staff in the implementation of research projects.

Nurture data culture at IFF

  • Supervise cross-departmental data management and data analysis team. Ensure high levels of data integrity, accessibility and integration.
  • Collaborate with IFF staff on the development of internal dashboards to track financial and non-financial data to drive and continuously reassess IFF transformative strategies.
  • Connect IFF data and external data to provide strategic insight into markets, sectors and impact.

Design and oversee program evaluation and impact measurement strategy

  • Design metrics to measure IFF social impact in consultation with the Executive Management Team.
  • Design methodologies, policies and procedures to capture lessons learned, build institutional knowledge and inform broader initiative. Work with other lines of business to implement.
  • Collaborate with other departments to design and implement program evaluation of major IFF initiatives.

Strengthen IFF’s position as a thought leader in key markets and sectors

  • Prepare and deliver public presentations to disseminate research findings for research projects.
  • Produce white papers to communicate insights gleaned from IFF initiatives for internal audience.
  • Identify opportunities to showcase insights relevant to external audience, and facilitate dissemination or publication of publish findings.
  • Collaborate with Corporate Communications and Public Affairs (CCPA) to develop public communication plans for research studies, public-facing tools and relevant lessons learned.

*View the complete listing here.

STEM Innovation Summit 2017

The Einstein Project invites administrators, educators and other STEM education stakeholders to participate in this opportunity to promote excellence in K-12 STEM initiatives.  We are hosting this free STEM Innovation Summit on Thursday, November 16, 8 AM to 3 PM at the UW-Green Bay Weidner Center.  Join us to hear featured guest speakers from The Smithsonian Science Center, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, as well as panel discussions with experts in the field of Makerspaces and curriculum implementation of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Learn how updates to Wisconsin’s science standards will impact your STEM curriculum and professional development needs. Hear about the successes and challenges from district leaders already making changes to meet the rigor envisioned in the Next Generation Science Standards. District team participation is encouraged to help you to develop a shared vision for the future and chart a course to remain on the cutting edge in STEM education.

Schedule

8 AM – Registration
9 AM –  STEM Talks
10 AM – Makers Mindset
11 AM – Lunch
12:15 PM  –  WI Standards Panel
1:30 PM – Smithsonian Interview
3 PM – Talk Tank Reception

 

Registration can be found at http://einsteinportal.2bsolutions.net/public-events/

Associate Dean and Director Native American Cultural Center position at Stanford

*Please do not contact BPC about this position. See contact info and details below or visit the listing online.
Associate Dean and Director, Native American Cultural Center  76223
Description

 

If you are ready to work for an organization that nurtures diversity, respect within the American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Pacific Islander students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, we invite you to explore this opportunity and apply online for the position of Associate Dean and Director of the Native American Cultural Center, a unit of the Division of Student Affairs.
The Native American Cultural Center is proud to be part of Student Affairs, which advances student development and learning; fosters community engagement; promotes diversity, inclusion and respect; and empowers students to thrive.
JOB PURPOSE:
 
The Associate Dean and Director of the Native American Cultural Center (NACC) is the chief administrator for NACC at Stanford.  The Director provides strategy, vision and direction regarding issues and objectives impacting NACC as part of the student services/affairs organization.  Primary responsibilities include strategic planning and assessment and conceptualizing and implementing policies, professional services, resources and programs that address identified concerns and needs of the community.  The Associate Dean and Director must also be attuned to the dynamics between the individual, the institution, and the home environment of students.
 
Liaise with senior management and cross functional areas and schools to implement this vision and strategy. The Associate Dean and Director of the NACC is the primary conduit between and among university offices and departments with particular attention to the American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Pacific Islander community, both undergraduate and graduate. Manage the work of other employees, including managers.
 
CORE DUTIES:
  • Manage the work of managers and other employees, processes, and projects, to implement the strategic goals of the unit, department, or school. Make hiring decisions, provide coaching and mentoring, and manage performance and staffing levels.
    • Supervise the Center’s two professional and, in conjunction with the Associate Directors, the student staff
    • Responsible for hiring, training, goal setting, performance management/reviews, compensation planning, and terminations.
  • Crisis prevention and intervention: conduct counseling, intervention and referral when necessary to assist students in resolving personal/academic problems and crises; collaborate with other university offices, such as Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and Residence Deans when necessary; develop appropriate outreach, education and programming to proactively address unique mental health and wellness issues affecting Native students.
  • Identify, clarify, and resolve complex issues with university­wide scope and impact and substantial significance which may span multiple areas, using advanced technical and professional knowledge requiring broad discretion and judgment.
    • Participate in the development and implementation of university policies to ensure student success, e.g. mental health, well-being, academic success, retention and graduation.
    • Serve on University committees such as the mental health task force subcommittee and other division committees.
  • Provide strategic direction for and manage the Center, including forecasting, planning, and managing program budgets. 
    • Develop, implement and manage long-range budget and strategic plans;
  • Develop, analyze, measure effectiveness and oversee programs and tools for delivery of student services or programs.
    • Provide individual advising to students on issues that include academics, career paths, internships, conflict resolution and personal matters.
    • Conceptualize, develop and implement quality student programs designed to promote student’s educational, social, cultural and leadership goals.
    • Advise and train students and student organizations in event planning, organizational development and conflict resolution.
  • Review exceptions to university, program or unit policies and procedures, settle grievances. 
  • Manage the direction of internal administrative policy development for programs and operations. May serve as senior advisor to dean on programmatic and policy development.
  • Interpret, implement and ensure compliance with university, academic and administrative policies within Student Affairs and NACC. Recommend new internal policies, guidelines and procedures. Direct process improvement.
  • Lead university­ or school­wide initiatives and campaigns; develop long range planning and policy development.
  • Represent department programs and initiatives at senior level meetings, conferences, and to both internal and external constituents. 
    • Participate in Vice Provost for Student Affairs divisional meetings and development activities and complete special projects as assigned.
  • Evaluate and recommend the technological needs and effectiveness for delivery of student programs and services
  • Identify, manage relationships, and negotiate with external and internal partners.
    • Collaborate with other community centers, programs and departments to develop and implement multicultural student leadership training.
    • Collaborate with other offices to impact the quality of undergraduate and graduate student life, including CAPS, Graduate Life Office, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Vice Provost for Graduate Education, Diversity & First Generation, Admissions, Stanford Alumni Association, schools & academic departments.
    • Maintain communication and collaborations with faculty, staff, alumni and other programs.  Involve them in center programming; assist in making connections with students.
Note: Not all unique aspects of the job are covered by this job description
Qualifications

 

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: 
 
Education & Experience:
Bachelor’s degree and eight years of relevant experience, or combination of education and relevant experience. Experience in higher education setting preferred.
 
Education & Experience:
  • User knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Advanced communication skills to clearly and effectively communicate information to internal and external audiences, client groups, and all levels of management.
  • Strong analytical skills to review and analyze complex financial information. Strong leadership and strategic management skills.
  • Demonstrated experience managing people.
  • Understanding of underlying technological needs and requirements. Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively.
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS*:
  • Frequently sit, perform desk­based computer tasks.
  • Occasionally stand, walk, twist, use fine manipulation, grasp, use a telephone, write by hand, sort and file paperwork, lift, carry, push, and pull objects that weigh up to 10 pounds.
* ­ Consistent with its obligations under the law, the University will provide reasonable accommodation to any employee with a disability who requires accommodation to perform the essential functions of his or her job
 
WORK STANDARDS:
  • Interpersonal Skills: Demonstrates the ability to work well with Stanford colleagues and clients and with external organizations.
  • Promote Culture of Safety: Demonstrates commitment to personal responsibility and value for safety; communicates safety concerns; uses and promotes safe behaviors based on training and lessons learned. Subject to and expected to comply with all applicable University policies and procedures, including but not limited to the personnel policies and other policies found in the University’s Administrative Guide, http://adminguide.stanford.edu/.
 
About NACC:
 
The mission of the Native American Cultural Center (NACC) is to create an environment of support for the American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Island undergraduate and graduate student population at Stanford, guided by the principle that students succeed where there is support for that success.  
 
NACC’s educational mission complements and enhances students’ learning and thriving at Stanford, based on active collaboration with academic and Student Affairs partners, alumni, and the tribal community beyond.  NACC strives to foster adaptive learning and community based learning models and experiences. 
 
Leadership development, counseling, advising, mentoring, academic support, intellectual and cultural programming, professional guidance, and service to campus and community are all venues to promote a sense of belonging or community, student wellness, retention, graduation, and preparation for global citizenship.  
 
NACC is a resource center and clearinghouse for Native issues, opportunities and programs to the campus community, potential students, families, scholars, tribal leaders, and other visitors. NACC staff are institutional border crossers who facilitate dialogues and strategic partnerships among multiple stakeholders.
 
NACC is committed to meeting student needs and challenges through innovative programs, resource development and campus partnerships.  It offers a range of services for both undergraduate and graduate students and has a solid reputation for nurturing student, faculty and staff initiatives.  
 
Programs and services of Native American Cultural Center are aligned with the Aims of a Stanford Education and provide students with various opportunities to own knowledge, hone skills and competencies, cultivate personal and social responsibility and participate in adaptive learning.
 
Experience a culture of excellence
 
Stanford University, located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, is one of the world’s leading teaching and research universities. Since its opening in 1891, Stanford has been dedicated to finding solutions to big challenges and to preparing students for leadership in a complex world. 
 
Supporting that mission is a staff of more than 10,000, which is rooted in a culture of excellence and values innovation, collaboration, and life-long learning. To foster the talents and aspirations of our staff, Stanford offers career development programs, competitive pay that reflects market trends and benefits that increase financial stability and promote healthy, fulfilling lives. An award-winning employer, Stanford offers an exceptional setting for professionals looking to advance their careers. 
Stanford is an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.
Finalist candidate must successfully pass a pre-employment background check.

Job

: Student Services

Location

: Vice Provost for Student Affairs

Schedule

: Full-time

Grade: K
Job Code: 7507

Apply Online!

Back-to-School Webinars and “Office Hours”

*Info from School House Connection.

t’s “back to school” time, and we’re pleased to kick off the season with a new webinar series that features guest state and local practitioners, as well as SHC staff and national partner policy experts. We’re also offering informal, open Q&A time through our weekly “office hours.” Schedules for August and September are listed below. Don’t forget our archives for the webinars on early childhood and higher education that we offered over the summer. We also encourage readers to check out webinar offerings by our partner, the National Center for Homeless Education.
SHC Webinars: August and September

 

Tuesday, August 22, 2017, 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM EDT
McKinney-Vento and ESSA: Back-to-School Review
TO REGISTER:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4465619581429179907Thursday, August 31, 2017, 12:00-1:15pm Eastern
Getting to Graduation: Strategies to Award Partial Credits, Recover Credits, and Award High School Diplomas for Students Experiencing Homelessness
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2154812276461166849

Title I and Homelessness: New Requirements and Best Practices for Funds and Data
Tuesday, September 12, 2017, 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM EDT
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7644737606399046401

Identifying Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness
Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM EDT
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7616433978077054977

Thursday, September 21, 2017, 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM EDT
Federal Policy Update on Child, Youth, and Family Homelessness
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7694839052808989187

Tuesday, September 26, 2017, 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM EDT
Federal Policy Update on Child, Youth, and Family Homelessness
(PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A REPEAT OF THE SEPTEMBER 21 WEBINAR)
TO REGISTER: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/4352816285993079553

To learn more about the topics and the presenters, and to register, see ourUpcoming Webinars page.

SHC “Office Hours:” Informal Q&A and Discussion
Our office hours are open forums for anyone to call in with questions about the law or implementation. SHC staff, along with guest state and school district practitioners, will host and facilitate these online sessions.

Wednesday, Aug 23, 2017, 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT
This week’s topic: The McKinney-Vento Act and Every Student Succeeds Act amendments.
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/232517406677716483

Wednesday, August 30, 2017, 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT
This week’s topic: The McKinney-Vento Act and Every Student Succeeds Act amendments.
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6163759215436296707

Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT
This week’s topic: The McKinney-Vento Act and Every Student Succeeds Act amendments, with a special focus on increasing high school graduation.
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6729811990671206659

Wednesday, September 13, 2017, 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT
This week’s topic: Title I and homelessness.
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4413943634435460867

Wednesday, September 20, 2017 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT
This week’s topic: Identifying Students Experiencing Homelessness.
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4339453920676909827

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT
This week’s topic: Early Childhood Education Services for Young Children Experiencing Homelessness, including child care, Early Head Start, Head Start, and preschool.
TO REGISTER: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2600747805163115523

Please see our Office Hours page for a full schedule of topics, hosts, and registration links.

Discovery Research PreK-12 Program Solicitation

National Science Foundation

Directorate for Education & Human Resources
Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings

Full Proposal Deadline(s) (due by 5 p.m. submitter’s local time):

November 14, 2017

November 14, 2018

Synopsis of Program:

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal’s main objectives and research questions. The program supports five types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, and (5) Conferences and Syntheses. All five types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands.

Proposal Preparation Instructions

  • Letters of Intent: Not required
  • Preliminary Proposal Submission: Not required
  • Full Proposals:

Submit your Proposal for Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL)

Full Proposal Deadline Date

November 6, 2017

SYNOPSIS

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) program seeks to advance new approaches to and evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments; and engage the public of all ages in learning STEM in informal environments.

The AISL program supports six types of projects: (1) Pilots and Feasibility Studies, (2) Research in Service to Practice, (3) Innovations in Development, (4) Broad Implementation, (5) Literature Reviews, Syntheses, or Meta-Analyses, and (6) Conferences.

CONTACTS

Name Email Phone Room
Address Questions to the  Program DRLAISL@nsf.gov (703)292-8616
For administrative questions contact the Program by e-mail at DRLAISL@nsf.gov or phone at (703)292-8616

Announcement of an Effort to Expand the NSF INCLUDES National Network

National Science Founation welcomes three types of proposals:

EAGER Proposals should produce findings and results that will generate new insights for the NSF INCLUDES National Network, suggest potential strategies for engaging NSF’s existing broadening participation activities in the Network and/or highlight lessons learned that could inform the NSF INCLUDES Launch Pilots and Alliances as they develop. EAGERs are encouraged that:

  1. Conduct research on the implementation and impact of strategies to improve specific problems of diversity and inclusion in STEM, especially strategies focused on expanding networks and scaling effective innovations. Studies should be grounded in the relevant social science, behavioral science, economic, or education research theories or frameworks, apply appropriate methods, and further the evidence-based research (e.g., the science of broadening participation) that illustrates the efficacy of the various approaches, especially collective impact-style approaches; or
  2. Examine strategies being used in projects in the existing NSF broadening participation portfolio. For example, research could examine the implementation, impact, network expansion, and scaling of change strategies used in NSF-funded projects within the NSF INCLUDES portfolio of Design and Development Launch Pilots, or projects funded through such programs as ADVANCE, the Broadening Participation in Computing Alliances, the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation(LSAMP), Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), and Math and Science Partnership, or the outreach activities of NSF research centers and large facilities aimed at broadening participation. Research could explore how strategies such as collective impact or networked improvement communities are being used to address the challenge of broadening participation in STEM.

Conference proposals to:

  1. Link to the NSF INCLUDES National Network the knowledge and results from the NSF broadening participation portfolio of programs and projects, and from NSF center-scale activities (e.g., Science and Technology Centers and Engineering Research Centers, among others), or other major Foundation investments, and encourage new opportunities for collaboration across the network;
  2. Generate novel ideas for how new and existing collaborations and organizations can help shape opportunities for connecting to the NSF INCLUDES National Network;
  3. Communicate research findings from the science of broadening participation research community to the NSF INCLUDES National Network, especially as these pertain to new efforts to translate basic research into practice; or
  4. Provide a platform for new collaborations within the NSF INCLUDES National Network to discuss the development of shared goals, common metrics, and mutually reinforcing activities.

Supplemental funding requests to:

  1. Create opportunities among currently-funded NSF projects, including NSF broadening participation projects, with the goal to build a collaborative infrastructure for broadening participation in NSF-funded research activities;
  2. Provide seed money for experiments in using effective strategies to further broadening participation goals through collaborative change;
  3. Develop linkages between current activities and NSF INCLUDES-funded Design and Development Launch Pilots, including adoption of common goals, shared measures, and mutually reinforcing activities; or
  4. Generate new ideas for bringing a community of NSF-funded projects into the NSF INCLUDES National Network.

Submission Deadlines and Special Instructions

There are two submission deadlines for funding requests in response to this Dear Colleague Letter. Before submitting EAGER or Conference proposals, eligible Principal Investigator(s) should email nsfincludes@nsf.gov with a one-page description of their project to determine suitability for this NSF INCLUDES Dear Colleague Letter and the appropriate deadline for the proposals. Any of the types of requests encouraged in this Dear Colleague Letter can be submitted to either deadline.

  • November 13, 2017
  • April 16, 2018

Funding requests for EAGERs and Conferences should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG): https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg. EAGERs may request up to $300,000 for two years. Conference proposals may be up to $250,000 for up to two years. EAGERs and Conference proposals should be submitted to NSF INCLUDES in the Human Resource Development (HRD) division.

Supplements from PIs of existing grants, other than current NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, in any directorate are welcome. Eligible supplements must have the potential to enhance both the Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts of the existing project. Projects must have an end date beyond September 30, 2018. Eligible Principal Investigator(s) contact their cognizant Program Director(s) and an NSF INCLUDES team member to discuss their request for supplemental support prior to submitting to NSF. The amount requested for supplemental support must be less than 20% of the original award amount, with direct costs not to exceed $200,000. Funding is dependent on the availability of funds. Supplemental funding requests should be prepared and submitted in accordance with the guidance in the NSF PAPPG, Part II: Award and Administration Guide, Chapter I.E.4: https://www.nsf.gov/publications/pub_summ.jsp?ods_key=pappg.

More information available here: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17111/nsf17111.jsp