Search Results for: evaluation

Evaluation 2017

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Dr. Bowman Contributes to AEA Feminist Issues in Evaluation Newsletter

As we focus on intersectionality, we reached out to members of other TIGs to solicit their perspectives on and experiences with intersectionality. Three colleagues from different sectors and life experiences discuss how they address issues of diversity, equity, and justice in their evaluation work.
Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape), PhD is President of Bowman Performance Consulting and an evaluator/ researcher with the University of WI-Madison. She currently chairs the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG and is a member of the Independent Consulting TIG and Multi-ethnic Evaluation TIG.

In your own words, how would you describe intersectionality?
Intersectionality feels like linear lines but when I practice it, it is round and relational. I enjoy seeing where things “connect” and “are related” (like our Indigenous traditional teachings). So I conceptualize and practice intersectionality as paths crossing on our journey and hopefully paths that continue to circle around and back as I learn and grow from and with others.

Describe your feelings about intersectionality (particularly with gender/feminism) and its impact in/on your work?
Connecting and relations (AKA intersectionality) are central to my life (academic, professional, and personal). And these are not just thoughts but concrete activities and community-based or Indigenous concepts/frameworks that make my work with intersectionality multi-dimensional. They span the realms of physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional as I carry my work out with and in service to others/community. Gender and feminism are only things I have to think about when the western world impacts my life/work. Traditionally speaking there is balance and male/female (and all things) to keep life running smoothly (and work). Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do and gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that feminism also can be inclusive like evaluation should be with different notions of two spirit people.

How can work on intersectionality impact or propel learning to action (this year’s AEA theme)?
Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do within evaluation. Making feminism, gender, or sexuality primarily defined, represented by, and framed via a heterosexual lens is not sufficient and also is excluding a large percent of the population. Feminism, gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that evaluators and the field of evaluation is equipped with the skills, knowledge, and abilities to effectively work with, for, and value our two spirit brothers and sisters.

*Read more here: http://mailchi.mp/7628c56bc902/aea-feminist-issues-in-evaluation-newsletter-july-2017?e=e25a028289

Using a Trauma-Informed Approach for Evaluation

Children’s Mental Health Initiative (CMHI) National Evaluation Web Event Training Series will host Using a Trauma-Informed Approach for Evaluation on Thursday, August 3, at 1 p.m. ET. Presenters will discuss trauma issues in evaluation from the perspective of youth and families from whom data is collected. This webinar will also identify techniques for data collection that use a trauma-informed approach.

Evaluation and the Framing of Race

Evaluation and the Framing of Race by

First Published March 15, 2017; pp. 167–189

Racial framing can have strong effects on programs, policies, and even evaluations. Racial framing developed as a justification for the exploitation of minorities and has been a primary causal factor in the persistence of racism. By being aware of its pattern, structure, origins, and how racial framing generates effects, we can significantly reduce its influence, thus enhancing the rigor of our studies by controlling for a potential bias that’s often covert. Stories play a critical role in framing and reframing processes. They constitute a key part of the vocabulary of action.

*Read here

Workshop: Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation by Fiona Cram

Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation (CRIE) is a transformative evaluation model for diverse Indigenous contexts. CRIE provides theoretical, methodological and practical evaluation strategies for carrying out culturally responsive evaluation of Indigenous services and programmes.

ANZEA is pleased to offer you the below workshop:

• Event: Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation (CRIE)Workshop facilitated by FIONA CRAM, PhD.

• Date: Tuesday, 25 July 2017, 9:00am – 4:30pm

• Place: ICIB Insurance Brokers, Level 7, 26 Hobson Street, Auckland 1010

• Cost: Workshop Fees (excluding GST) as below

– Early bird – closes 10 July, ANZEA Member $349.00, Non-Member $399.00, Student (Full time only) $249.00

– Standard – closes 21 July,  ANZEA Member $379.00, Non-Member $429.00, Student (Full time only) $249.00

• Register: Please register by completing our online registration form here or for any further information please contact ANZEA’s Manager, Immanuela Pfeiffenberger on info@anzea.org.nz.Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Please note the Auckland workshop is limited to a maximum of 30 participants.

Register Online for this Workshop

Read more.

NEW Open Access Resource on Evaluation Questions

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a Library Guide on Evaluation Questions earlier this month.  This Library Guide includes open access materials on evaluation questions from a variety of authors, organizations, and settings. Each item included in the Library Guide meets predetermined criteria of merit, relevance, and accessibility.

The resource includes materials in four categories as follows: Introduction to Evaluation Questions; How to Develop or Use Evaluation Questions; Evaluation Questions Linked to Evaluation Approaches, Designs, or Criteria; and Discussion of Evaluation Questions in Specific Contexts.

http://libguides.library.cdc.gov/evaluationquestions

Evaluation/Research position at LEAD Center

Looking for an evaluation/researcher position with the Community of Practice?
The LEAD Center is recruiting (in partnership with Gear Learning) to fill this position.

http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/495223/games-and-learning-researcher
GAMES AND LEARNING RESEARCHER at UW–Madison<http://jobs.hr.wisc.edu/cw/en-us/job/495223/games-and-learning-researcher>
jobs.hr.wisc.edu

Video: President of the American Evaluation Association, Dr. Kathryn Newcomer’s Testimony at EvalPartners Global Forum

This video presents testimonies from the Third Global Evaluation forum, organized by EvalPartners.

EvalPartners, the Global Partnership for evaluation capacity development together with International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE) and United Nations Evaluation Group (UNEG) are planning for the third Global Evaluation Forum to be held from 24-27 April 2017.

The GEF III addressed priorities for evaluation during the first five years of the 15-year period addressed by the SDGs. EvalAgenda 2020 was approved during the second Global Evaluation Forum and voluntary collaborative road-map for its implementation was established by the various stakeholders attended the forum.

The GEF III brang together, as previous events, government representatives, parliamentarians, evaluation community, development partners, civil society, and the media to review progress of the EvalAgenda2020, particularly in the context of the Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that were launched in September 2015, are now under implementation and where evaluation is seen as an important contributor to the follow-up and review processes.

Dr. Bowman’s video testimony from EvalPartners & United Nations Evaluation Global Forum in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

This video presents testimonies from the Third Global Evaluation forum, organized by EvalPartners.

EvalPartners, the Global Partnership for evaluation capacity development together with International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE) and United Nations Evaluation Group (UNEG) are planning for the third Global Evaluation Forum to be held from 24-27 April 2017.

The GEF III addressed priorities for evaluation during the first five years of the 15-year period addressed by the SDGs. EvalAgenda 2020 was approved during the second Global Evaluation Forum and voluntary collaborative road-map for its implementation was established by the various stakeholders attended the forum.

The GEF III brang together, as previous events, government representatives, parliamentarians, evaluation community, development partners, civil society, and the media to review progress of the EvalAgenda2020, particularly in the context of the Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that were launched in September 2015, are now under implementation and where evaluation is seen as an important contributor to the follow-up and review processes.

Book: Culture and Evaluation

Nicole Bowman coauthored a chapter in the NEW BOOK Continuing the Journey to Reposition Culture and Cultural Context in Evaluation Theory and Practice.  Visit BPC’s YouTube channel for previews of the publication and interviews with the authors.

Visit InfoAge Publishing to buy your copy now!