Search Results for: evaluation

Vice President of Research and Evaluation role at IFF

Responsibilities:

The Vice President for Research and Evaluation will be responsible for the following:

Grow research consulting business

  • Innovate in response to marketplace: develop research consulting products that inform and guide social impact investments into social service sectors and comprehensive community development.
  • Prepare and manage annual budget for research department. Manage projects and staff time to meet established utilization rate and financial sustainability goals.
  • Develop client outreach strategy to maintain pipeline of contracted and grant supported research projects. Grow research network through meetings, presentations and marketing. Coordinate with regional staff, EDs and SVPs/VPs in selling research products.
  • Coordinate with Resource Development Department to identify funders and raise philanthropic dollars for research projects.
  • Evaluate internal tools for potential commercialization and work to bring those tools to market.

Oversee research team and portfolio

  • Maintain IFF research brand: ensure all studies and research products maintain IFF’s high standard of rigor, integrity and intellectual independence, while being pragmatic and actionable with practical recommendations based in best practice.
  • Develop project proposals and budgets. Negotiate contracts. Manage grants and funder relationships. Collaborate in funder report preparation, as necessary.
  • Support, inspire and guide staff in the implementation of research projects.

Nurture data culture at IFF

  • Supervise cross-departmental data management and data analysis team. Ensure high levels of data integrity, accessibility and integration.
  • Collaborate with IFF staff on the development of internal dashboards to track financial and non-financial data to drive and continuously reassess IFF transformative strategies.
  • Connect IFF data and external data to provide strategic insight into markets, sectors and impact.

Design and oversee program evaluation and impact measurement strategy

  • Design metrics to measure IFF social impact in consultation with the Executive Management Team.
  • Design methodologies, policies and procedures to capture lessons learned, build institutional knowledge and inform broader initiative. Work with other lines of business to implement.
  • Collaborate with other departments to design and implement program evaluation of major IFF initiatives.

Strengthen IFF’s position as a thought leader in key markets and sectors

  • Prepare and deliver public presentations to disseminate research findings for research projects.
  • Produce white papers to communicate insights gleaned from IFF initiatives for internal audience.
  • Identify opportunities to showcase insights relevant to external audience, and facilitate dissemination or publication of publish findings.
  • Collaborate with Corporate Communications and Public Affairs (CCPA) to develop public communication plans for research studies, public-facing tools and relevant lessons learned.

*View the complete listing here.

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017

Using Social Media to Prepare for Evaluation 2017 by Jayne Corso

Posted: 30 Sep 2017 05:06 AM PDT

Hi my name is Jayne Corso and I am the Community Manager for AEA. Evaluation 2017 is just a month away! I have compiled a few ways you can prepare for joining us in Washington D.C. using some social media tools.

Hot Tip: Follow AEA on Social Media

Follow AEA on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest news surrounding the conference. We will be sharing key deadlines, education updates, and announcements about what to except during Evaluation 2017.

Hot Tip: Follow #Eval17 on Twitter

If you are active on Twitter, start following our conference hashtag, #Eval17. Many members of the evaluation community are using this hashtag to discuss their presentations and start conversations before Evaluation 2017 even starts. Don’t be shy, join the conversation!

Hot Tip: Search for Speakers

Connect with Evaluation 2017 speakers on Twitter. Many of our speakers are active on twitter and share relevant evaluation resources. Start following these speakers and make a connection before you step foot in D.C.

I hope these tips help you prepare for your trip to Evaluation 2017. Stay tuned for more tips on how to use social media and connect with AEA online during the conference. I look forward to seeing everyone in D.C.

Do you have questions, concerns, kudos, or content to extend this aea365 contribution? Please add them in the comments section for this post on the aea365 webpage so that we may enrich our community of practice. Would you like to submit an aea365 Tip? Please send a note of interest to aea365@eval.org . aea365 is sponsored by the American Evaluation Association and provides a Tip-a-Day by and for evaluators.

Explore Ways to Learn from Evaluation

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Dr. Bowman’s NIEA Keynote: Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation

*View on SlideShare Dr. Bowman’s keynote, Indigenous Innovations: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Education through Evaluation.

About Dr. Bowman

Dr. Nicole Bowman is the president and founder of the nationally award-winning Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) in Shawano, Wisconsin. Dr. Bowman earned her PhD in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Her dissertation is recognized as the nation’s first multi-jurisdictional educational policy study in the country to systemically examine how Tribal and non-Tribal educational policy is developed and implemented as public and Tribal governments intersect to educate Indigenous students attending K-12 public schools. Through her work at BPC and UW-Madison, she provides culturally responsive evaluation, research, and policy subject matter expertise where Tribal and non-Tribal governments and organizations collaborate. These projects and initiatives work towards improving the health, economy, education, justice, social, cultural, and human service outcomes for Indigenous populations in reservation, rural, urban, and international community contexts. Dr. Bowman has contributed over two decades of culturally responsive and multi-jurisdictional evaluation, research, training and technical assistance. Dr. Bowman has an academic appointment at UW-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research as a subject matter expert in culturally responsive research, policy, and evaluation through the Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation and Dissemination (LEAD) Center and the Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative (WEC) Center. She is also an affiliate researcher for the Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment (CREA) Center at the University of Illinois-Urbana. Dr. Bowman’s practical, passionate, and effective leadership attributes resonate and empower others at every level.

About NIEA

The National Indian Education Association advances comprehensive, culture-based educational opportunities for American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.

NIEA Vision Statement
Our traditional Native cultures and values are the foundations of our learning therefore, NIEA will:

  • Promote educational sovereignty;
  • Support continuing use of traditional knowledge and language;
  • Improve educational opportunities and results;

in our communities.

The National Indian Education Association (NIEA) was formed in 1970, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, by Native educators who were anxious to find solutions to improve the education system for Native children. The NIEA Convention was established to mark the beginning of a national forum for sharing and developing ideas, and influencing federal policy.

NIEA adheres to the organization’s founding principles: 1) to bring Native educators together to explore ways to improve schools and the schooling of Native children; 2) to promote the maintenance and continued development of Native languages and cultures; and 3) to develop and implement strategies for influencing local, state, and federal policy and policymakers.

Based in Washington, D.C., NIEA is governed by a 12-member Board of Directors elected annually by membership. Executive Director Ahniwake Rose, who reports to the board, leads NIEA’s dedicated staff of advocates.

Sign up Now! Evaluation Conference

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times

4th International Conference (September 27-29), Evidence Matters: Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment Translating to Action and Impact in Challenging Times (http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017 ). E

September 26, 2017

Pre-conference workshops

http://crea.education.illinois.edu/home/crea-conference-2017/pre-conference-workshops

September 27, 2017

Indigenous /Native American Welcome Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

http://www.trickstergallery.com/

Opening Keynote Address

Teresa LaFromboise, Ph.D.  Professor of Education and Chair of Native American Studies (Stanford University)

Welcome Reception

September 28, 2017

Morning Plenary Session: Evaluation in the Context of Race, Class, and Social Justice

Featured Speakers

Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D.  Professor, Curriculum and Instruction (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Ernie House, Ph.D.  (Professor Emeritus University of Colorado-Boulder)

Chair: Melvin Hall, Ph.D. Professor of Educational Psychology (Northern Arizona University)

Discussant: Rodney Hopson, Ph.D. Professor Educational Psychology, Research Methods, Education Policy George Mason University

Edmund W. Gordon Senior Distinguished Lecture and Luncheon

Senior Distinguished Lecturer

Guillermo Solano-Flores. Ph.D. Professor of Education (Stanford University)

Forms of Evidence that Also Matter: The Correspondence of Rigorous Methodology and Fair Assessment Practices in a Diverse Society

Chair: Peggy Carr, Ph.D. Acting Commissioner, National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education

Discussant: Karen Kirkhart, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work (Syracuse University)

American Evaluation Association Race and Class Dialogue (http://eval.org/RaceDialogues)

In person and Webcast

September 29, 2017

Luncheon Keynote Address

Robin L. Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (Michigan State University)

“Hiding in plain sight: On culturally responsive evaluation and LGBTQ communities of color”.

Indigenous/ Native American Closing Ceremony

Organized by Joseph Podlasek (Ojibwe) CEO of Trickster Art Gallery

Job Announcement: Assoc. or Full Professor of Evaluation- Department of Educational Psychology

The Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, announces a position for a leading scholar in evaluation.  This position affirms Illinois’ decades of national and international leadership in contemporary evaluation theory and practice that consequentially strengthens educational and social programs and policies.

This evaluation scholar will join a diverse community of educational researchers with shared commitments to equity and social justice.  Our diversity lies not only in the demographics of our faculty and graduate students, but also in evaluative and research methodologies and epistemologies. The Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois is widely recognized as one of the top five Educational Psychology Departments in the country; our College of Education is in the top 25. There are many opportunities to collaborate on evaluation projects with top-ranked programs across campus (e.g., College of Engineering, School of Social Work, National Center for Super Computing Applications, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Human Development and Family Studies, and the new College of Medicine). We seek a colleague in evaluation who will contribute to our notable scholarship and further enhance our national leadership in educational evaluation.

 

Further details can be found at https://jobs.illinois.edu/faculty-positions/job-details?jobID=85109&job=college-of-education-associate-or-full-professor-of-evaluation-educational-psychology-f1700089

Evaluation 2017

About Evaluation 2017

2017 marks the American Evaluation Association’s (AEA) 31st Annual Conference. Taking place on November 6-11 in Washington, D.C., Evaluation 2017 brings together evaluators, evaluation scholars, students, and evaluation users from around the world are invited to assemble, share, and learn from the successes of the international discipline and practice of evaluation.

No matter your skill level, Evaluation 2017 will provide the opportunity to be involved in the shared experience through a variety of presentations and learning formats. Click here for a more detailed description of our session formats.

From Learning to Action

During Evaluation 2017, we will explore four ways that our community can learn from evaluation to create better practices and outcomes. Evaluation is dependent on learning from each other and putting theory into action. Each learning opportunity presents unique challenges and together, as a community, I would like to answer the questions that will allow us to move beyond these challenges to find solutions to improve our programs and create greater good for society as a whole.

Learn more: http://www.evaluationconference.org/

Register here: http://www.evaluationconference.org/p/cm/ld/fid=503

Dr. Bowman Contributes to AEA Feminist Issues in Evaluation Newsletter

As we focus on intersectionality, we reached out to members of other TIGs to solicit their perspectives on and experiences with intersectionality. Three colleagues from different sectors and life experiences discuss how they address issues of diversity, equity, and justice in their evaluation work.
Nicole Bowman (Mohican/Lunaape), PhD is President of Bowman Performance Consulting and an evaluator/ researcher with the University of WI-Madison. She currently chairs the Indigenous Peoples in Evaluation TIG and is a member of the Independent Consulting TIG and Multi-ethnic Evaluation TIG.

In your own words, how would you describe intersectionality?
Intersectionality feels like linear lines but when I practice it, it is round and relational. I enjoy seeing where things “connect” and “are related” (like our Indigenous traditional teachings). So I conceptualize and practice intersectionality as paths crossing on our journey and hopefully paths that continue to circle around and back as I learn and grow from and with others.

Describe your feelings about intersectionality (particularly with gender/feminism) and its impact in/on your work?
Connecting and relations (AKA intersectionality) are central to my life (academic, professional, and personal). And these are not just thoughts but concrete activities and community-based or Indigenous concepts/frameworks that make my work with intersectionality multi-dimensional. They span the realms of physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional as I carry my work out with and in service to others/community. Gender and feminism are only things I have to think about when the western world impacts my life/work. Traditionally speaking there is balance and male/female (and all things) to keep life running smoothly (and work). Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do and gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that feminism also can be inclusive like evaluation should be with different notions of two spirit people.

How can work on intersectionality impact or propel learning to action (this year’s AEA theme)?
Gender and feminism have become more important in my work as we seek to include diversity within all we do within evaluation. Making feminism, gender, or sexuality primarily defined, represented by, and framed via a heterosexual lens is not sufficient and also is excluding a large percent of the population. Feminism, gender, sexuality, (i.e. LGBTQF, etc.) really need to be considered more so that evaluators and the field of evaluation is equipped with the skills, knowledge, and abilities to effectively work with, for, and value our two spirit brothers and sisters.

*Read more here: http://mailchi.mp/7628c56bc902/aea-feminist-issues-in-evaluation-newsletter-july-2017?e=e25a028289

Using a Trauma-Informed Approach for Evaluation

Children’s Mental Health Initiative (CMHI) National Evaluation Web Event Training Series will host Using a Trauma-Informed Approach for Evaluation on Thursday, August 3, at 1 p.m. ET. Presenters will discuss trauma issues in evaluation from the perspective of youth and families from whom data is collected. This webinar will also identify techniques for data collection that use a trauma-informed approach.