Search Results for: evaluation

UN Women Guide Published and Launch Event: Inclusive Systemic Evaluation for Gender equality, Environments and Marginalized voices (ISE4GEMs)

Kia ora everyone

I’m forwarding this particular note because of its significance.  It is the culmination of some excellent work over the past three years by members of UN Woman and their colleagues, especially Anne Stephens, Ellen Lewis and Shravanti Reddy.  

Briefly this is the most recent evaluation methodology based on systems.  It is a unique combination of two important systems traditions; feminist systems and critical systems.  What makes it almost unique is that it is essentially a soup to nuts evaluation manual rather than a general description of a particular evaluation approach.  

Declaration of interest : I was a member of the advisory group.

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We are very pleased to share with you the link to the final guide introducing Inclusive Systemic Evaluation for Gender Equality, Environments and Marginalized voices (ISE4GEMs): A new approach for the SDG era <http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2018/9/ise4gems-a-new-approach-for-the-sdg-era>. The development of this guide is the culmination of the efforts, energies and commitments of the three co-authors together with the advice and support of  our Advisory Group members. 

We were able to deliver a 1-day pre-conference training on the approach at the European Evaluation Society conference last week that was well attended. We are also hosting a launch event (in-person and online) on 18th October from 10:00AM – 11:30AM (NY time) and would like to invite you to attend. The official announcement will be shared shortly with the link to connect.  

Best regards, 
Anne, Ellen and Shravanti

#FridayFreebie Dr. Bowman’s NEW American Journal of Evaluation (AJE) Article

Looking Backward but Moving Forward: Honoring the Sacred and Asserting the Sovereign in Indigenous Evaluation

Waapalaneexkweew (Nicole R. Bowman-Farrell, Mohican/Lunaape) has published a new article in the American Journal of Evaluation.  Read the full article here.

Abstract from the article: 

Culturally responsive evaluation and culturally responsive Indigenous evaluation (CRIE) within the broader field of evaluation are not often included in Western literature nor are they known or used by the majority of mainstream evaluators. In order to address this literature and practice gap, this article offers an overview and a broader origin story of CRIE prior to colonial or European contact in the United States and gives an overview of the historical, theoretical, and practical foundations for conducting CRIE in a contemporary evaluation context. Examples of evidence-based models, theories, and resources are provided to connect CRIE to Western evaluation designs and provide concrete strategies for the field of evaluation going forward. The article concludes with systemic and policy evaluation considerations as agencies from federal (i.e., United States), tribal, and international governments and partners from private or nonprofit sectors collaborate to carry out Indigenous evaluations in the future. Collectively this multijurisdictional, culturally responsive, and community-centered
CRIE approach gives evaluators a new way to move forward.

Leveraging Program Evaluation and Data to Improve Your Services: Part 2

Leveraging Program Evaluation and Data to Improve Your Services: Part 2
Part 2 of this two-part webinar hosted by the Midwest Regional Children’s Advocacy Center and sponsored by OJJDP is scheduled for Sept. 27 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. EDT. This webinar will provide an overview of program evaluation, discuss the types of evaluation, and cover how to select the best type of evaluation based on specific organizational needs. Register now

Leveraging Program Evaluation and Data to Improve Your Services: Part 1

Leveraging Program Evaluation and Data to Improve Your Services: Part 1
Part 1 of this two-part webinar hosted by the Midwest Regional Children’s Advocacy Center and sponsored by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is scheduled for Sept. 13 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. EDT. This webinar will provide an overview of program evaluation, discuss the types of evaluation, and cover how to select the best type of evaluation based on specific organizational needs. Register now

Leveraging Program Evaluation and Data to Improve Your Services: Part 2

https://events-na8.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1110525827/en/events/event/shared/1152760591/event_landing.html?sco-id=2201059835

 

Leveraging Program Evaluation and Data to Improve Your Services: Part 1

https://events-na8.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1110525827/en/events/event/shared/1152760591/event_landing.html?sco-id=2201111016#

 

UW-Extention is Hiring: Evaluation and Program Development Specialist

For more info, please follow the link:

https://www.careers.wisconsin.edu/psc/careers/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_APP_SCHJOB.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST&Action=U&FOCUS=Applicant&SiteId=33&JobOpeningId=14516&PostingSeq=1

 

American Evaluation Association

Call for applications

AEA Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI)

Deadline Thursday May 24, 2018

The American Evaluation Association welcomes applications for its Graduate Education Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program that provides paid internship and training opportunities during the academic year. The GEDI program works to engage and support students from groups traditionally under-represented in the field of evaluation. The goals of the GEDI Program are to:

  • Expand the pool of graduate students of color and from other under-represented groups who have extended their research capacities to evaluation
  • Stimulate evaluation thinking concerning under-represented communities and culturally responsive evaluation
  • Deepen the evaluation profession’s capacity to work in racially, ethnically and culturally diverse settings

Interns may come from a variety of disciplines, including public health, education, political science, anthropology, psychology, sociology, social work, and the natural sciences. Their commonality is a strong background in research skills, an interest in extending their capacities to the field of evaluation, and a commitment to thinking deeply about culturally responsive evaluation practice.

Before applying for this program, please review the eligibility requirements and expectations:

The Internship: Building on the training content described below, the interns work the equivalent of approximately two days per week at an internship site near their home institutions from approximately September 1 to July 1. The interns may work on a single evaluation project or multiple projects at the site, but all internship work is focused on building skills and confidence in real-world evaluation practices. Interns receive a stipend of $10,000 in recognition of their internship work based on completion of the internship and satisfactory finalization of program requirements, including any deliverables due to the host agency, progress reports, and reflections on the internship experience.

Training and Networking Components : It is assumed that students come to the program with basic qualitative and quantitative research skills. The GEDI Program then works to extend those skills to evaluation through multiple activities:

  • Fall Seminar A five-day intensive seminar provides an orientation that expands the student’s knowledge and understanding of critical issues in evaluation, including thinking about building evaluation capacities to work across cultures and diverse groups. The interns complete a self-assessment in the Fall, clarifying their own goals during program participation.
  • AEA Annual Conference Interns will spend a week at the American Evaluation Association annual conference. While there, they attend  (a) pre-conference workshops selected to fill gaps in their knowledge and skills, (b) conference sessions exploring the breadth and depth of the field, and (c) multiple networking events to connect them with senior colleagues. The interns also conduct a small-service learning project in the form of an evaluation of one component of the conference.
  • Winter Seminar A three-day seminar, held in January or February, provides the students with additional training, coaching on their evaluation projects, and panel discussions with evaluation practitioners working in a range of contexts.
  • Evaluation Project Interns will have the opportunity to provide support to an agency’s evaluation activities in close proximity to their graduate institution. Interns will provide three updates on their evaluation project activities as part of the internship program, describing and reflecting on the application of their evaluation knowledge to the actual project activities.
  • Monthly Webinars The students gather each month for a two-hour webinar to check in on evaluation projects and site placements, add to existing skill-sets, and learn from invited guest speakers.
  • AEA/CDC Summer Evaluation Institute The program ends with attendance at the Summer Evaluation Institute held in Atlanta each June. There, students once again connect and finalize project reporting, attend training workshops, and participate in a graduation ceremony.

Student Benefits: Interns receive support from advisors and mentors, quality training focused on evaluation, real-world work experience, registration waivers and guidance at two professional evaluation conferences, and multiple opportunities for professional networking. In recognition of the time involved in the program (approximately 2 days per week), each intern also receives a stipend and is reimbursed for major travel expenses related to the program (airfare and shared hotel specifically).

Eligibility: We seek students who are not already enrolled in an evaluation program/specialization or pursuing an evaluation degree who:

  • Are enrolled in a masters or doctoral-level program in the United States and have completed the equivalent of one full year of graduate level coursework;
  • Are residing in the United States;
  • Have already been exposed to research methods and substantive issues in their field of expertise;
  • Demonstrate via written essays the relevance of evaluation training to their career plans and their commitment to culturally responsive practice;
  • Are eligible to work for pay in the United States outside of an academic environment (non-U.S. citizens will be asked to provide documentation of current eligibility); and
  • Have support from his/her academic advisor.

Criteria for Selection: The interns will be selected based on their completed applications, materials provided, and subsequent finalist interviews focusing on:

  • Their thinking around and commitment to culturally responsive evaluation practice;
  • The alignment between their skills, aspirations, locale, and internship site placement needs;
  • The quality of their academic, extracurricular, and personal experiences as preparation for GEDI; and
  • Their capacity to carry out and complete the program, including support from an academic advisor

To applyDownload the GEDI Application and return all requested materials via email as described on that document on or before Thursday, May 24, 2018. Please note that it may take a few weeks to compile the requested information and thus we recommend that you begin as soon as possible before the deadline.

Questions: We recommend beginning by reviewing our  Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page. Should you have further questions about the program, email  gedi@eval.orgGo to the GEDI homepage to learn more about the program.

Enhancing Evaluation Through Effective Communication and Interactions

Keynote speaker Rita S. Fierro, PhD from Fierro Consulting

MAE’s 23rd Annual Conference

May 10, 2018

Go to our website at maeeval.org for more information

Call for Proposals: A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

A Working Conference to Chart the Future of Evaluation Education and Training

March 19-20, 2018

Sponsored by

The Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute (MESI), University of Minnesota

The University of Melbourne (Australia) Centre for Program Evaluation

Claremont Graduate University

The Teaching of Evaluation Topical Interest Group of the American Evaluation Association

The purpose of this working conference is to engage evaluation trainers, instructors, and faculty to begin a formal discussion of the current status of the education and training of program evaluators. The conference will address a range of essential questions, including:

– What are foundational questions in the area of evaluation education, and how can researchers and practitioners collaborate to describe and
explore them together?
– What are the risks of not addressing evaluation education with data-driven questions and solutions?
– What research exists on evaluator education/training, and what is needed?
– How can research on evaluation education be strengthened?

We seek proposals from people who are actively engaged in evaluation education practice so we can establish a collaborative, professional community of individuals charged with teaching the current and future generations of evaluators.

A number of presentation opportunities are available for participants to share their theoretical and empirical work on evaluation education. We are requesting proposals for presentations of 3-5 minutes on a variety of topics related to the education and training of evaluators, including, but not limited to, the following:

– Conceptual framings of evaluator and evaluation education/training
– Research on evaluator and evaluation education/training
– The status and future of evaluation educators in different settings (e.g., university, paid professional development, conferences, in-house
trainings, on-line)
– The role of competencies in curriculum development
– Pedagogy for the practice of evaluation
– Assessing learning and impact from evaluator education/training programs
– The appropriateness and potential of program accreditation and/or evaluator credentialing
– Good questions to shape our vision and future work

All proposals will undergo peer-review for content and fit with conference goals.  For your work to be considered, please complete the application at https://goo.gl/forms/DjzyHmozZtj9lITQ2 and submit your form by January 15, 2018.

Anticipated benefits of this conference and the pre-work leading to it include the following:

Benefits for participants

·         Adding a conference presentation to your resume or CV
·         Establishing connections with others working in evaluation education
·         Participating in a conversation that will shape the research agenda and future of evaluator education

Potential benefits for participants over time

·         Collaborative research and eventual; publications on key topics identified
·         Participation in AEA conference panel presentations in coming years
·         Access to an ongoing community working on cutting edge research to improve teaching practice

The working conference will occur concurrently with the annual Spring Training of the Minnesota Evaluation Studies Institute. It will begin at
5:00 PM on Monday, March 19, 2018 with an introductory working session and dinner, then continue throughout the day on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, with presentations in the morning and early afternoon and ending with agenda setting and final debriefing. There will be no cost to attend the working conference, although participants can attend the MESI conference for an additional fee.  See www.evaluation.umn.edu for details and more information.